Page:Federalist, Dawson edition, 1863.djvu/130

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cxxviii
Contents.
Essay. Page
ii. his authority in this case compared with that of the Governor of New York, No. LXVIII. 480
f. he is commander-in-chief of the army and navy of the United States, 480
i. his authority therein compared with that of the King of Great Britain, 480
ii. his authority therein compared with that of the Governor of New York, 480
iii. his authority therein compared with that of the Governors of New Hampshire and Massachusetts, 481
g. his power to pardon offenders against the laws, 481
i. his authority therein compared with that of the Governor of New York, 481
h. his power, in one case, to adjourn the Congress, 482
i. his power therein compared with that of the King of Great Britain, 482
ii. his power therein compared with that of the Governor of New York, 482
i. his treaty-making power, 482
i. his power therein compared with that of the King of Great Britain, 482
j. his power to receive ambassadors and public ministers, 483
k. his power, in connection with the Senate, to appoint ambassadors and other ministers, 483
i. his power therein compared with that of the King of Great Britain, 484
ii. his power therein compared with that of the Governor of New York, 484
l. the general authority of the President reviewed, and compared with that of the Governor of New York, 485
m. the general authority of the President reviewed, and compared with that of the King of Great Britain, 485
E. the provisions of the new Constitution, concerning the Executive, further considered, LXIX. 486
a. the idea that a vigorous executive is inconsistent with the genius of republican government examined and refuted, 486
b. "the ingredients which constitute energy in the Executive" considered, 487
i. unity 488
i. it has been approved by the soundest political writers, 488
ii. it is indisputably conducive to energy, 488
iii. in what manner it may be destroyed, 488