Page:Federalist, Dawson edition, 1863.djvu/140

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cxxxviii
Contents.
Essay. Page
a. it contains no Bill of Rights, No. LXXXIV. 595
A. the constitution of New York contains none, considered, 595
a. it contains provisions in the body of the instrument, which, in substance, amount to the same thing, 595
b. it adopts, in their full extent, the common and statute laws of Great Britain, 595
B. the proposed Constitution contains, in the body of the instrument, similar equivalent provisions, 595
C. a Bill of Rights will be unnecessary, because the People will surrender nothing in the adoption of the proposed Constitution, and the government will be administered by their immediate representatives and servants, 598
D. a Bill of Rights would be dangerous, as implying the grant of all powers not expressly withheld, 599
E. the liberty of the press considered, 599
F. the proposed Constitution itself a Bill of Rights, 600
b. "the seat of government will be too remote from many of the States to admit of a proper knowledge, on the part of the constituent, of the conduct of the representative," 601
c. there is no provision respecting debts due to the United States, 603
d. the additional expense which will be imposed by the new system, 603
A. the increase of offices under the new government considered, 604
a. in many cases the State officers will be diminished to the same extent, 605
b. the judiciary will furnish the principal additions, 605
B. the diminished sessions of the Congress will counterbalance much of the increased expense, 605
C. the State legislatures, also, will hold shorter sessions, at diminished cost, 606
D. concluding remarks, 606
VI. "ITS ANALOGY TO YOUR [the People of the State of New York] OWN STATE CONSTITUTION," LXXXV. 607
VII. "THE ADDITIONAL SECURITY WHICH ITS ADOPTION WILL AFFORD TO THE PRESERVATION OF THAT SPECIES OF GOVERNMENT, TO LIBERTY, AND TO PROPERTY," 608
VIII. CONCLUDING REMARKS, 609
1. the manner in which Publius had discussed the subject considered, 609
A. an appeal to the reader to weigh the subject under discussion carefully, and to act conscientiously, 609