Page:Federalist, Dawson edition, 1863.djvu/616

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
472
The Fœderalist.

cies in the Senate, by temporary appointments; which not only invalidates the supposition, that the Clause before considered could have been intended to confer that power upon the President of the United States, but proves that this supposition, destitute as it is even of the merit of plausibility, must have originated in an intention to deceive the People, too palpable to be obscured by sophistry, too atrocious to be palliated by hypocrisy.

I have taken the pains to select this instance of misrepresentation, and to place it in a clear and strong light, as an unequivocal proof of the unwarrantable arts which are practised, to prevent a fair and impartial judgment of the real merits of the Constitution submitted to the consideration of the People. Nor have I scrupled, in so flagrant a case, to allow myself a severity of animadversion, little congenial with the general spirit of these papers. I hesitate not to submit it to the decision of any candid and honest adversary of the proposed Government, whether language can furnish epithets of too much asperity, for so shameless and so prostitute an attempt to impose on the citizens of America.

PUBLIUS.




[From the New York Packet, Friday, March 14, 1788.]

THE FŒDERALIST. No. LXVII.



To the People of the State of New York:

THE mode of appointment of the Chief Magistrate of the United States, is almost the only part of the system, of any consequence, which has escaped without severe censure, or which has received the slightest mark of