Page:Federalist, Dawson edition, 1863.djvu/621

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477
The Fœderalist.

any State from his seat as Senator, to place him in that of President of the Senate, would be to exchange, in regard to the State from which he came, a constant for a contingent vote. The other consideration is, that as the Vice-President may occasionally become a substitute for the President, in the supreme Executive magistracy, all the reasons which recommend the mode of election prescribed for the one, apply with great if not with equal force, to the manner of appointing the other. It is remarkable, that in this, as in most other instances, the objection which is made would lie against the Constitution of this State. We have a Lieutenant-Governor, chosen by the People at large, who presides in the Senate, and is the constitutional substitute for the Governor, in casualties similar to those which would authorize the Vice-President to exercise the authorities, and discharge the duties of the President.

PUBLIUS.




[From the New York Packet, Friday, March 14, 1788.]

THE FŒDERALIST. No. LXVIII.



To the People of the State of New York:

I PROCEED now to trace the real characters of the proposed Executive, as they are marked out in the plan of the Convention. This will serve to place in a strong light the unfairness of the representations which have been made in regard to it.

The first thing which strikes our attention is, that the Executive authority, with few exceptions, is to be vested in a single magistrate. This will scarcely, however, be considered as a point upon which any comparison can