Page:History of Willamette Railroad.djvu/20

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158
Leslie M. Scott

road April 27, 1890. The receivership of Charles N. Scott was not officially terminated, however, until August 12, 1891. In the summer of 1890 the newly organized company abandoned the line between Woodburn and Ray's Landing, ten miles. Late in 1890 the narrow gauge system was leased to the Oregon and Califomia Railroad, but was not formally absorbed by the latter company until 1893.[1]

  1. The principal places along the route of the narrow gauge, and the mileage, were as follows: Portland to Oswego, 7.3 miles; Tualatin, 13.1; Newberg, 26.4; Dundee Jt., 28.8; Fulquartz, 31.2; Ray's Landing, 33.3; St. Paul, 35.4; Woodburn, 43.4; Mt. Angel, 49.7; Silverton, 53.9; Howell Prairie, 58.2; Macleay, 63.8; Waldo Hills, 63.1; Aumsfille, 69.1; West Stayton, 72.9; North Santiam, 75; West Scio, 78.3; South Santiam, 83.8; Lebanon Jt., 90.8; Brownsville, 103.7; Coburg, 123.0. Dayton, 32.7; Lafayette 34.7; Dayton Jt., 37.8; Whites, 44.8; Sheridan Jt., 50.2; Ballston, 52.9; Sheridan, 57.2. Perrydale, 52.4; Dallas, 63.0; Monmouth, 70.1; Airlie, 79.4.
    From official time tables, 1887. Running time, Portland to Dundee Jt., 3 hours; Dundee to Lafayette, 37 minutes; Sheridan Jt. to Airlie, 2 hours, 30 minutes; Ray's Landing to Coburg, 8 hours.