Page:Life and Adventures of William Buckley.djvu/145

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LIFE OF BUCKLEY.

CHAPTER IX.

CHANGE OF SETTLEMENT.—VISIT FROM THE PUTNAROOS AND WAINWORRAS.—MR. GELLIBRAND.—ENGAGE AS INTERPRETER.—ANOTHER ARRIVAL.—FIRST HOUSE BUILT.—COLONISING EXCITEMENT.—DISPUTES BETWEEN THE SETTLERS AND NATIVES.—TWO SETTLERS KILLED.

"For 'tis a goodly sight to see
  What Heaven has done for this delicious land;
  What fruits of fragrance blush on every tree,
  What goodly prospects o'er the hills expand."


By the same vessel which brought my pardon, there arrived also instructions from the Directors of the Company forming the settlement, for us to break up our present encampment, and take up our station on the right bank of the Yarra from its source, at a spot they had fixed upon as the site of a town; little thinking, however, it was, in so brief a space of time, to become the capital of a mighty colony, replete in itself with all that is required to found a nation of pre-eminent importance.