Page:Life and Adventures of William Buckley.djvu/161

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138
LIFE OF BUCKLEY.

CHAPTER XI.

CHARGE AGAINST A NATIVE.—HOW SUSTAINED.—THE CLIMATE.—SAIL FOR HOBART TOWN.—HOSPITABLE RECEPTION.—NARROW ESCAPE FROM BECOMING A PUBLIC PERFORMER.—GOVERNMENT HOUSE.—AGAIN ENTER THE PUBLIC SERVICE.—MY MARRIAGE.—DISCHARGE AND PENSION.—NARRATIVE DRAWS TO A CLOSE.

My march of life is nearly ended;
Bugler,—sound the "Halt!"


I have already related some of the circumstances connected with the loss of Messrs. Gellibrand and Hesse. Soon after the search for them had been given up, a vessel arrived at Geelong from Van Diemen's Land with goods and passengers; amongst them was a carpenter, who had with him a tool-chest and other baggage to carry up from the beach. By that time the natives had acquired the industrious habit of working in this way, many of them being very useful and civil, after their fashion; in fact, all those who know