Page:Pocahontas, and Other Poems.djvu/88

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MIGRATION OF BIRDS.

��NOVEMBER came on, with an eye severe,

And his stormy language was hoarse to hear,

And the glittering garland of brown and red,

Which he wreath 'd for a while round the forest's head,

With a sudden' anger he rent away,

And all was cheerless, and bare, and grey.

Then the houseless grasshopper told his woes,

And the humming-bird sent forth a wail for the rose,

And the spider, that weaver, of cunning so deep,

Roll'd himself up in a ball to sleep ;

And the cricket his merry horn laid by

On the shelf, with the pipe of the dragon-fly.

Soon the birds were heard, at the morning-prime, Consulting of flight to a warmer clime. " Let us go ! let us go ! " said the bright-wing'd jay ; And his gay spouse sang from a rocking spray, " I am tir'd to death of this hum-drum tree, I'll go, if 'tis only the world to see."

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