Page:Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell (Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë, 1846).djvu/33

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23
THE PHILOSOPHER.


It would not do—the pillow glowed,
 And glowed both roof and floor;
And birds sang loudly in the wood,
 And fresh winds shook the door;


The curtains waved, the wakened flies
 Were murmuring round my room,
Imprisoned there, till I should rise,
 And give them leave to roam.


Oh, stars, and dreams, and gentle night;
 Oh, night and stars return!
And hide me from the hostile light,
 That does not warm, but burn;


That drains the blood of suffering men;
 Drinks tears, instead of dew;
Let me sleep through his blinding reign,
 And only wake with you!

Ellis.



THE PHILOSOPHER.

"Enough of thought, philosopher!
 Too long hast thou been dreaming
Unlightened, in this chamber drear,
 While summer's sun is beaming!
Space-sweeping soul, what sad refrain
Concludes thy musings once again?