Page:Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell (Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë, 1846).djvu/35

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25
THE PHILOSOPHER.


The spirit sent his dazzling gaze
 Down through that ocean's gloomy night
Then, kindling all, with sudden blaze,
 The glad deep sparkled wide and bright—
White as the sun, far, far more fair
 Than its divided sources were!"


"And even for that spirit, seer,
 I've watched and sought my life-time long;
Sought him in heaven, hell, earth, and air—
 An endless search, and always wrong!
Had I but seen his glorious eye
 Once light the clouds that wilder me,
I ne'er had raised this coward cry
 To cease to think, and cease to be;
I ne'er had called oblivion blest,
 Nor, stretching eager hands to death,
Implored to change for senseless rest
 This sentient soul, this living breath—
Oh, let me die—that power and will
 Their cruel strife may close;
And conquered good, and conquering ill
 Be lost in one repose!"

Ellis.