Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 41.djvu/74

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64
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.

Danish people, who are very loyal in sending to it specimens they may find. The Government itself is very wide awake to the importance of such, work as is here done, and has acted vigorously in the matter of preserving tumuli and other monuments of the past.

Anthropology is by no means neglected in Switzerland. With men like Vogt and Kollman in physical anthropology, with museums of ethnography at Basel, Bern, and Zurich, it is still true that the department of prehistoric archæology leads the rest there. This is quite natural, for every lake has its old village sites and every town of consequence has its collection of "lake-dwelling" antiquities. There are more than two score such, of some importance, in Switzerland. Certainly those at Bern and Zurich may be taken as good examples. The former, under Dr. van Fellenberg, represents very fully all three of the great "ages" of the archæologist. The oldest lake-dwelling villages of Europe date back to the age of stone (the neolithic period); many were of the bronze age; some were of the early part of the age of iron. Some

PSM V41 D074 Paolo Mantegazza.jpg
Prof. Paolo Mantegazza.

of the sites were occupied continuously from the older to the later time, while others represent only a single period. At Zurich are the collections upon which Dr. Keller's work was based, and very much valuable and interesting material from recent explorations undertaken quite near the city. Dr. Heierli, who teaches prehistoric archæology in the University of Zurich, has still a largely unworked field in Lake Zurich. It is a mistake to think of the lake-dwelling sites as "worked out."

Italy is very active in anthropological work. At Turin Prof. Guido Cora conducts a geographical journal which contains much ethnographic matter; in the same city Prof. Lombroso experiments, writes books, and edits a journal, to which is due much of the present interest in criminal anthropology. In Florence are Mantegazza, Giglioli, and Regalia. At Perugia, Belluchi works away at the stone age of Italy. In Rome is one of the great eth-