Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 70.djvu/98

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94
THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
 

PSM V70 D098 Columbia university earl hall headquarters of the aaas.jpg

Earl Hall, Columbia University. This building is the headquarters of the American Association and the affiliated societies.

 

advancement and diffusion of science.

It is not possible in this note to give a statement even of the main features of the programs. The American Association meets in ten sections, each with its own presiding officers and its program of papers and discussions lasting several days. There are further about twenty national societies which meet in affiliation, sometimes holding joint sessions with the sections of the association or with one another and sometimes meeting separately. These societies, which include those devoted to astronomy, physics, mathematics, chemistry, geology, geography, zoology, entomology, bacteriology, physiology, anatomy, botany, psychology, philosophy and anthropology, each has its independent organization and officers, so it is obvious that the programs are extensive. There will be at least five hundred papers read, which when published in detail will fill more than ten thousand pages.

The high character and broad interest of the proceedings may be briefly but adequately shown by a list of some of the retiring or presiding officers, most of whom will make addresses. Every one familiar with science in America will understand that they represent the best work now being accomplished. These officers include: Professor W. H. Welch of the Johns Hopkins University, Professor C. M. Woodward of Washington University, Professor William James of Harvard University, Professor Charles B. Davenport of the Cold Spring Biological Laboratory, Professor E. C. Pickering of the Harvard College Observatory, Professor Carl Barus of Brown University, Professor W. F. Osgood of Harvard University, Dr. W. F. Hillebrand of the U. S. Geological Survey, Mr. C. C. Adams of New York City, Professor W. E. Castle of Harvard University, Mr. A. H. Kirtland of Maiden, Mass., Professor Erwin F. Smith of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Professor W. H. Howell of the Johns Hopkins University, Professor Franklin P. Mall of the Johns Hopkins University, Dr. F. S. Earle of Herradura, Cuba, Professor J. R. Angell of the University of Chicago, Professor F. W. Putnam of Harvard University, Professor John F. Woodhull of Teachers' College, Columbia University, Professor Edward Kasner of Columbia University, Professor W. C. Sabine of Harvard University, Mr. Clifford Richardson of New York City, Mr. W. R. Warner of Cleveland, Ohio, Dr. A. C. Lane of the Michigan Geological Survey, Professor