Page:Popular Science Monthly Volume 78.djvu/207

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203
THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

rivaling Harvard and Columbia in its endowments and standards—which will continue to share with the state institution the educational leadership of the state. Minnesota has no competition; and its situation in a large city and adjacent to the capital of the state gives it certain advantages, especially for its professional schools. It has been more fortunate than other state universities in retaining possession of its land grants and in finding them to be the site of vast mineral resources. Most of all it is happy in the possession of a population of high character and intelligence.

Historians are likely to describe the epochs of a country's history under the reigning sovereigns, whether these personages have played a significant or an insignificant part in its affairs. Universities are in like manner known by the administrations of their successive presidents.

Dr. W. W. Folwell was in charge during the infancy of the University of Minnesota, from 1869 to 1884. Dr. Cyrus Northrop has in truly patriarchal fashion guided its vigorous youth. Almost his last official act was to welcome the scientific societies to Minneapolis. Dr. G. E. Vincent, professor of sociology in the University of Chicago, active in its educational management and in the Chautauqua movement inaugurated by his father, now assumes the presidency. It is difficult to exaggerate the possibilities of the development of the university during his administration.

All the buildings now on the campus have been erected within the past twenty-five years. In spite of or on account of their varying and somewhat naive styles of architecture they make a pleasing impression. Folwell Hall, the headquarters for the scientific societies, is a building admirably constructed for class work. Chemistry, physics and the natural sciences have satisfactory buildings, though it is planned to replace or alter them. Extensive groups of buildings are to be erected for the engineering and medical departments. The university has not as yet made use of its position

 

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The Library.