Page:Sacred Books of the East - Volume 3.djvu/342

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308
ODE 4.
THE SHIH KING.

first sovereign of Shang 1 Received the appoint- ment without any element of instability in it, And it is (now) held by the descendant of Wû- ting 2 .

The descendant of Wû-ting Is a martial sove- reign, equal to every emergency. Ten princes, (who came) with their dragon-emblazoned banners, Bear the large dishes of millet.

The royal domain of a thousand lî Is where the people rest ; But the boundaries that reach to the four seas commence there.

From the four seas 3 they come (to our sacri- fices) ; They come in multitudes. King has the Ho for its outer border 4 . That Yin[1] should have received the appointment (of Heaven) was entirely right; —(Its sovereign) sustains all its dignities.

Ode 4. The Khang Fâ.

CELEBRATING HSIEH, THE ANCESTOR OF THE HOUSE OF SHANG ; HSIANG-THÛ, HIS GRANDSON; THANG, THE FOUNDER OF THE DYNASTY; AND Î-YIN, THANG'S CHIEF MINISTER AND ADVISER.

It does not appear on occasion of what sacrifice this piece was made. The most probable view is that of Mâo, that it was the

That is, Thang.

If this ode were used, as Kǎng supposes, in the third year after Wû-ting's death, this 'descendant' would be his son 3û- kǎng, B.C. 1265 to 1259.

This expression, which occurs also in the Shû, indicates that the early Chinese believed that their country extended to the sea, east, west, north, and south.

Kû Hsî says he did not understand this line ; but there is ground in the 3o Kwan for our believing that King was the name of a hill in the region where the capital of Shang was.


  1. We saw in the Shû that the name Shang gave place to Yin after the time of Pan-kǎng, B.C. 1401 to 1374. Wû-ting's reign was subsequent to that of Pan-kǎng.