Page:Southern Historical Society Papers volume 28.djvu/79

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Charlotte Cavalry. 73

eral R. E. Lee's army in 1863, when it invaded Pennsylvania. Our brigade was in the battle of Martinsburg, Va., where we captured (with the aid of other troops), the town, artillery and prisoners. In June, 1863, this company and the Churchville cavalry charged through Chambersburg, Penn.; about 9 o'clock at night, and drove away the home guard. From Chambersburg Jenkins's Brigade went to Carlisle, and then was ordered again in front of Lee's army on its way to Gettysburg. Some of our company were with General Jubal A. Early in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. We guarded pris- oners "til the evening of the third day, when we were sent to the rear of the Federal lines to join General Jeb. Stuart's command, who was fighting General Grigg's cavalry. We were put in line of battle on the extreme left of our infantry, near Rummel's barn. The cav- alry fight of the evening of the third day at Gettysburg was a des- perate battle. Major Eakle, the only field officer, was soon disabled, and had to retire, leaving the command of the regiment to myself. A very large per cent, of the men and officers engaged were killed or wounded.

I went, together with Generals Hampton, Munford, and others, to that battle-field, long after the war, and aided in locating the very lines which we then occupied.

Returning from Gettysburg, several of our company were killed and wounded at Williamsport, July 14, 1863, myself among the wounded. The hard service the company saw with Lee's army after its return from Pennsylvania, in 1863, until I recovered from the effects of my wound, I have no personal knowledge of. It partici- pated in the great cavalry battle at Brandy station, where more cav- alry were said to have been engaged than in any other battle.

We served under General John Echols, in the battle of Droop Mountain, not far from Lewisburg, West Virginia, and spent the winter of 1863-' 64 in Monroe county, West Virginia.

In the spring of 1864, General Jenkins having been killed, our brigade was placed under General John M. McCausland. This com- pany and the Churchville cavalry constituted McCausland's extreme rear-guard from Covington to Buchanan, while McCausland was in front of Hunter and Crook, delaying their advance on Lynchburg, Va. Every foot of ground was contested, and every possible hind- rance imposed in the enemy's advance. We made charge after charge, and had many skirmishes. At Buchanan, so closely was