Page:Southern Historical Society Papers volume 29.djvu/47

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Memoir of Jane, C. Johnson. 33

celebration of a birth that gave to the South this giant among its statesmen, its patriots and its leaders, and to the world another name " that was not born to die."

There was great applause at the conclusion of the ceremonies.

Mrs. Smith arose and thanked the Army of Tennessee veterans for a beautiful bouquet which she had received, and Mrs. McLellan recognized the gift of a like compliment from Colonel Chalaron.

Then Dr. Palmer dismissed the gathering with the benediction.

MEMOIR OF JANE CLAUDIA JOHNSON.

Few women had the good fortune in the war between the States to have such opportunities for good as the subject of this memoir, and no one ever improved them as she did.

She was of distinguished ancestry. Her father, Romulus M. Saun- ders, of North Carolina, was a member of Congress from 1819 to 1844; from 1845-49, Minister Plenipotentiary to Madrid, authorized to offer $100,000,000 for the Island of Cuba. He had really nomi- nated James K. Polk for the Presidency by devising and securing the adoption of the two-third rule at the Democratic National Con- vention in Baltimore in 1844.

A majority of the delegates had come instructed to vote for Van Buren. But, in the meantime, Van Buren had taken position in opposition to the annexation of Texas, and the Southern Van Buren man wanted him defeated, hence the two-third rule, which required two-thirds of all the members to make the nomination.

The mission to Spain, then the most important diplomatic position in the Government, was a recognition of his service to the party, to the cause of Texas, and to the President elect.

The mother of Mrs. Johnson was Anna Hayes Johnson, daughter of the Hon. William Johnson, of South Carolina, Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, appointed by Mr. Jefferson in 1804, and who married the brilliant young member of Congress from North Carolina when she was quite a young woman.

She was a splendidly handsome, brilliant, and intellectual woman,