Page:Southern Historical Society Papers volume 40.djvu/165

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161
Stonewall Jackson.

to us from the grave that solemn injunction expressed by him in those words, which must go ringing down the centuries, and, I trust, be remembered by his countrymen whenever there may be the temptation to sacrifice honor to ease, or liberty to safety:

"What is life without honor?

"Degradation is worse than death.

"We must think of the living and of those who are to come after us, and see that by God's blessing we transmit to them the freedom we have ourselves inherited."

And so, in the coming generations and ages, may the statue of our beloved commander, which shall be erected here, be a perpetual reminder of the precious lessons of his life; and may Virginians be ever so obedient to the heavenly vision that in time of stress and trial, when the well being, the virtue, and the liberties of their country shall be imperilled, some future heroic soldier of righteousness will point his countrymen to the figure of Jackson, as it will forever stand out from the pages of history, and again utter that now immortal rallying cry:


"Look! there stands Jackson like a stone wall!

"Rally behind the Virginians!"