Page:Statesman's Year-Book 1899 American Edition.djvu/172

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UNITED STATES


There were within the scope of the Service 402 disasters to documented vessels, having on board 3113 persons, of whom only 12 were lost. The estimated value of the vessels was $5,861,320, and that of the cargoes $1,307,070, making the aggregate value of property imperilled $7,168,390. Of this amount, $6,410,630 was saved and $757,860 lost. The number of vessels totally lost was 59.

The number of disasters to undocumented craft, comprising sailboats, rowboats, scows, etc., was 365, involving 874 persons, 10 of whom perished. The value of property involved is estimated at $199,705, of which amount $177,825 was saved and $21,880 lost.

The following statement shows the aggregate number of disasters and their results:

Total number of disasters 767
Total value of property involved $7,368,095
Total value of property saved $6,588,355
Total value of property lost $779,740
Total number of persons involved 3,987
Total number of persons lost 22
Total number of persons succored at stations 663
Total number of days' succor afforded 1,328
Number of vessels totally lost 59

The total number of disasters during the year was much larger than appears in the records of any former year. It is noted, however, that the loss of life was only 22, as against 53 during the year 1897, when the total number of disasters was not nearly so great, and is considerably less in proportion to the number of disasters in any previous year.

The net expenditure for the maintenance of the Service for the fiscal year was $1,497,676.35.

The following is a general summary of the statistics of the Service from the introduction of the present system in 1871 to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1898:

Total number disasters 10,448
Total value of vessels $113,346,275
Total value of cargoes $47,839,149
Total value of property involved $161,185,424
Total value of property saved $125,630,262
Total value of property lost $35,555,162
Total number of persons involved 81,245
Total number of lives lost 845
Total number of persons succored 13,876
Total number of days' succor afforded 35,199

Internal Communications

Railways

The growth of the railway system of the United States dates from 1827, when the first line was opened for traffic at Quincy, Mass. According to Poor's Railroad Manual, the extent of railways in operation in 1830 was 23 miles; it rose to 2818 miles in 1840; to 9021 miles in 1850; to 30,626 miles in 1860; to 52,022 miles in 1870; to 93,296 miles in 1880; to 166,698 miles in 1890; and 182,600 in 1896.