Page:The European Concert in the Eastern Question.djvu/315

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299
THE TREATY OF BERLIN.

kovska, and Drainica Plan, then the Descani Kladanec, the watershed of the High Sukowa and of the Morava, goes straight to the Stol, and descends from it so as to cut the road from Sofia to Pirot, 1,000 metres north-west of the village of Segusa. It ascends in a straight line the Vidlic Planina, and thence Mount Radocina in the chain of the Kodza Balkan, leaving to Servia the village of Doikinci, and to Bulgaria that of Senakos.

From the summit of Mount Radocina the frontier follows towards the north-west, the crest of the Balkans by Ciprovec Balkan and Stara Planina up to the former eastern frontier of the Principality of Servia, near to the Kula Smiljova cuka, and thence that former frontier as far as the Danube, which it joins at Rakovitza[1].

Treaties. Art. XXXVII. Until the conclusion of fresh arrangements no change shall be made in Servia in the actual conditions of the commercial intercourse of the Principality with foreign countries[2].

Dues. No transit duties shall be levied on goods passing through Servia.

Foreigners. The immunities and privileges of foreign subjects, as well as the rights of Consular jurisdiction and protection, as at present existing, shall remain in full force so long as they shall not have been modified by mutual consent between the Principality and the Powers concerned[3].

Railways.

Art. XXXVIII. The Principality of Servia takes the place,
  1. The Delimitation Commission for Servia, on which Great Britain was represented by Major Wilson, and afterwards by Capt. Anderson, assisted by Lieut. Ross of Bladensburg, sat from 22nd October, 1878, till it adjourned for the winter, and again from 9th May to 19th August, 1879. Its tracing of the frontier between Servia and Bulgaria was adopted by the Bulgarian Delimitation Commission. Parl. Papers, 1880, Turkey, No. 2; N. R. G. 2me Série, vi, 267−354. Differences which arose in 1884 between Servia and Bulgaria with reference to territory near Bregovo were considered by representatives of Germany, Austria, and Russia, who recommended the cession of the place to Bulgaria in return for other territory or a money compensation.
  2. A Treaty of Commerce with Servia was made by Great Britain on 7th February, 1880. Parl. Papers, 1880, Commercial, No. 27; N. R. G. 2me Série, vi, 459; by Austria on 6th May, 1881.
  3. Italy made a Consular Convention with Servia on 28th October, and an Extradition Treaty on 9th November, 1879. N. R.G. 2me Série, vi, 644−655. Russia relinquished her rights of Consular jurisdiction by a notification of 13th May, 1868.