Page:The Voice of Truth.djvu/36

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
26
VIEWS OF THE POWERS AND POLICY OF THE GOVERNMENT.

foreign invasion and internal broil, and whenever that body passes an act to maintain right with any power; or to restore right to any portion of her citizens, it is the supreme law of the land, and should a state refuse submission, that state is guilty of insurection or rebellion, and the president has as much power to repel it as Washington had to march against the 'whiskey boys of Pittsburg,' or General Jackson had to send an armed force to suppress the rebellion of South Carolina!

To close, I would admonish you, before you let your 'candor compel' you again to write upon a subject, great as the salvation of man, consequential as the life of the Savior, broad as the principles of eternal truth, and valuable as the jewels of eternity, to read in the eighth section and first article of the constitution of the United States, the first, fourteenth, and seventeenth 'specific' and not very 'limited powers' of the federal government, what can be done to protect the lives, property and rights of a virtuous people, when the administrators of the law, and law makers, are unbought by bribes, uncorrupted by patronage, untempted by gold, unawed by fear, and uncontaminated by tangling alliances—even like Ceasar's wife, not only unspotted but unsuspected! and God, who cooled the heat of a Nebuchadnezzar's furnace, or shut the mouths of lions for the honor of a Daniel, will raise your mind above the narrow notion, that the general government has no power—to the sublime idea that Congress, with the President as executor, is as almighty in its sphere, as Jehovah is in his.
          With great respect, I have the honor to be your ob't s'v't,

JOSEPH SMITH.


Hon. ('Mr.!') J. C. Calhoun, Fort Hill, S. C.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

VIEWS OF THE POWERS
AND POLICY OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE U. S.

~~~~

Born in a land of liberty, and breathing an air uncorrupted with the sirocco of barbarous climes, I ever feel a double anxiety for the happiness of all men, both in time and in eternity. My cogitations, like Daniel’s, have for a long time troubled me, when I viewed the condition of men throughout the world, and more especially in this boasted realm, where the Declaration of Independence "holds these truths to be self-evident; that all