Page:The Works of Lord Byron (ed. Coleridge, Prothero) - Volume 3.djvu/307

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
This page has been proofread, but needs to be validated.
CANTO III.]
275
THE CORSAIR.


Then seek Anselmo's cavern, to report
The tale too tedious—when the triumph short. 1290


IV.

In that wild council words waxed warm and strange,[1]
With thoughts of ransom, rescue, and revenge;
All, save repose or flight: still lingering there
Breathed Conrad's spirit, and forbade despair;
Whate'er his fate—the breasts he formed and led
Will save him living, or appease him dead.
Woe to his foes! there yet survive a few,
Whose deeds are daring, as their hearts are true.


V.

Within the Haram's secret chamber sate[2]
Stem Seyd, still pondering o'er his Captive's fate; 1300
His thoughts on love and hate alternate dwell,
Now with Gulnare, and now in Conrad's cell;
Here at his feet the lovely slave reclined
Surveys his brow—would soothe his gloom of mind;
While many an anxious glance her large dark eye
Sends in its idle search for sympathy,
His only bends in seeming o'er his beads,[3]
But inly views his victim as he bleeds.

  1. Within that cave Debate waxed warm and strange.—[MS.]
    Loud in the cave Debate waxed warm and strange.—[January 6, 1814.]
    In that dark Cotmcil words waxed zoarni and strange.—[January 13, 1814.]

  2. [Lines 1299-1375 were written after the completion of the poem. They were forwarded to the publisher in time for insertion in a revise dated January 6, 1814.]
  3. The comboloio, or Mahometan rosary; the beads are in number ninety-nine. [Vide ante, p. 181, The Bride of Abydos, Canto II. line 554.]