Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 1.djvu/194

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Sec. 7. And be it further enacted,Continuance of this act. That this act shall continue in force until the fourth day of March, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six, and no longer.

Approved, September 22, 1789.


Statute Ⅰ.



Sept. 23, 1789.
[Obsolete.]
Chap. ⅩⅧ.—An Act for allowing certain Compensation to the Judges of the Supreme and other Courts, and to the Attorney General of the United States[1]


Salaries of Chief Justice, justices of the Supreme Court, and district judges.Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in America in Congress assembled, That there shall be allowed to the judges of the Supreme and other courts of the United States, the yearly compensations herein after mentioned, to wit: to the Chief Justice four thousand dollars; to each of the justices of the Supreme Court three thousand five hundred dollars; to the judge of the district of Maine one thousand dollars; to the judge of the district of New Hampshire, one thousand dollars; to the judge of the district of Massachusetts twelve hundred dollars; to the judge of the district of Connecticut one thousand dollars; to the judge of the district of New York fifteen hundred dollars; to the judge of the district of New Jersey one thousand dollars; to the judge of the district of Pennsylvania sixteen hundred dollars; to the judge of the district of Delaware eight hundred dollars; to the judge of the district of Maryland fifteen hundred dollars; to the judge of the district of Virginia eighteen hundred dollars; to the judge of the district of Kentucky one thousand dollars; to the judge of the district of South Carolina eighteen hundred dollars; to the judge of the district of Georgia fifteen hundred dollars; and to the Attorney General of the United States fifteen hundred dollars; which compensationsCommencement of, and how payable. shall commence from their respective appointments, and be paid at the treasury of the United States in quarterly payments.

Approved, September 23, 1789.


Statute Ⅰ.



Sept. 24, 1789. [Obsolete.]
Chap. ⅩⅨ.—An Act for allowing a Compensation to the President and Vice President of the United States.


President and Vice President of the U. States, compensation to, commencement of, and how payable.Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That there shall be allowed to the President of the United States, at the rate of twenty-five thousand dollars, with the use of the furniture and other effects, now in his possession, belonging, to the United States; and to the Vice President, at the rate of five thousand dollars per annum, in full compensation for their respective services, to commence with the time of their entering on the duties of their offices respectively, and to continue so long as they shall remain in office, and to be paid quarterly out of the treasury of the United States.

Approved, September 24, 1789.


  1. By an act passed February 20, 1819, chap. 15, the annual salary of the Chief Justice of the United States was fixed at five thousand dollars, and the salaries of the Justices of the Court at four thousand five hundred dollars.

    The Acts relative to the compensation of the Attorney General of the United States subsequent to the act of September 23, 1789, have been: Act of March 2, 1797, chap. 3; act of March 2, 1799, chap. 38; act of February 20, 1804, chap. 12. By the act of February 20, 1819, chap. 15, the salary of the Attorney General was fixed at three thousand five hundred dollars per annum. By the 10th section of the act of May 29, 1830, chap. 153, an addition of five hundred dollars per annum was made to the salary of the Attorney General. In the general appropriation act of March 3, 1841, chap. 16, the sum of one thousand five hundred dollars was appropriated as compensation of clerk and messenger in the office of the Attorney General. Authority to appoint a messenger was given to the Attorney General by the act of August 26, 1842, chap. 202.