Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 1.djvu/422

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with this act, continued in force for the space of one year, from the passing of this act, and from thence until the end of the session of Congress then, or next thereafter holden, and no longer.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted,Accounts thereof how and when furnished and settled. That in all cases, where any sum or sums of money have issued, or shall hereafter issue, from the treasury, for the purposes of intercourse or treaty, with foreign nations, in pursuance of any law, the President shall be, and he hereby is authorized to cause the same to be duly settled annually with the accounting officers of the treasury, in manner following, that is to say; by causing the same to be accounted for, specifically, in all instances, wherein the expenditure thereof may, in his judgment, be made public; and by making a certificate or certificates, or causing the Secretary of State to make a certificate or certificates of the amount of such expenditures, as he may think it advisable not to specify; and every such certificate shall be deemed a sufficient voucher for the sum or sums therein expressed to have been expended.

Approved, February 9, 1793.


Statute Ⅱ.



Feb. 9, 1793

Chap. Ⅴ.—An Act regulating foreign Coins, and for other purposes.[1]


Rates of foreign coins established.Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the first day of July next, foreign gold and silver coins shall pass current as money within the United States, and be a legal tender for the payment of all debts and demands, at the several and respective rates following, and not otherwise, viz: The gold coins of Great Britain and Portugal, of their present standard, at the rate of one hundred cents for every twenty-seven grains of the actual weight thereof; the gold coins of France, Spain and the dominions of Spain, of their present standard. at the rate of one hundred cents for every twenty-seven grains and two fifths of a grain, of the actual weight thereof. Spanish milled dollars, at the rate of one hundred cents for each dollar, the actual weight whereof shall not be less than seventeen pennyweights and seven grains; and in proportion for the parts of a dollar. Crowns of France, at the rate of one hundred and ten cents for each crown, the actual weight whereof, shall not be less than eighteen pennyweights and seventeen grains, and in proportion for the parts of a crown. But no foreign coin that may have been, or shall be issued subsequent to the first day of January, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two, shall be a tender, as aforesaid, until samples thereof shall have been found, by assay, at


  1. Acts relating to foreign coins: An act to provide more effectually for the collection or the duties imposed by law on goods, wares, and merchandise, imported into the United States, and on the tonnage of vessels, August 4, 1790, chap. 35, sec. 40; an act relative to the rix dollar of Denmark, March 3, 1791, chap. 19; an act regulating foreign coins, and for other purposes, February 9, 1793, chap. 5; an act supplementary to an act regulating foreign coins, and for other purposes, February 1, 1798, chap. 11; an act to regulate the collection of duties on imports and tonnage, March 2, 1799, chap. 22, sec. 61; an act to suspend in part the act entitled, “An act regulating foreign coins, and for other purposes,” April 30, 1802, chap. 38; an act regulating the currency of foreign coins in the United States, April 10, 1806, chap. 22; an act regulating the currency within the United States, of the gold coins of Great Britain, France, Portugal, and Spain, and crowns of France, and five franc pieces, April 29, 1816, chap. 139; an act to continue in force an act regulating the currency within the United States, of the gold coins of Great Britain, France, Portugal, and Spain, and crowns of France, and five franc pieces, March 3, 1819, chap. 96; an act to continue in force an act entitled, “An act regulating the currency within the United States, of the gold coins of Great Britain, France, Portugal, and Spain, and crowns of France, and five franc pieces,” March 3, 1821, chap. 52; an act to continue in force an act entitled, “An act regulating the currency within the United States, of the gold coins of Great Britain, France, Portugal, and Spain, and crowns of France, and five franc pieces,” March 3, 1823, chap. 49; an act regulating the value of certain foreign silver coins within the United States, June 25, 1834, chap. 71; an act regulating the value of certain foreign gold coins within the United States, June 28, 1834, chap. 96; an act supplementary to an act entitled, “An act establishing a mint, and regulating the coins of the United States,” January 18, 1837, chap. 3, sec. 8; an act regulating the currency of foreign gold and silver coins in the United States, March 3, 1843, chap. 69; an act to fix the value of certain foreign moneys of account in computations at the custom-house, March 3, 1843, chap. 92.