Page:United States Statutes at Large Volume 7.djvu/417

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TREATY WITH THE MENOMONIES. 1832.. 407 assigned for this determination, by them, being reported in the journal of the said commissioner, which will be transmitted with this agreement.) And whereas after failing in the object last stated, the said George B. Porter endeavored to procure the assent of the said chiefs and headmen of the Menominee nation to the best practicable terms short of those proposed by the Senate of the United States; and alter much labor and pains, entreaty and persuasion, the said Menominees consented to the following, as the modifications which they would make; and which are reduced to writing, in the form of an agreement, as the best practicable terms which could be obtained from them, short of those proposed by the Senate of the United States, which they had previously positively refused to accede to. And as the modifications so made and desired, have been acceded to by the New York Indians, with a request that the treaty thus modified might be ratified and approved by the President and the Senate of the United States, it is the anxious desire of the Mencminees also, that the treaty, with these alterations may be ratified Objects. and approved without delay, that they may receive the benefits and advantage secured to them by the several stipulations of the said treaty, of which they have so long been deprived. The following is the article of agreement made between the said George B. Porter, commissioner on the part of the United States, specially appointed as aforesaid, and the said Menominee nation, through their chiefs and headmen on the part of their nation. Fms·1·. The said chiefs and headmen of the Menominee nation of Grant of land Indians do not object to any of the matters contained in the proviso *0,*}*** $*0**- annexed to the resolution of the Senate of the United States, so far as g;€€;O%g;S°° the same relate to the granting of three townships of land on the east town Indians. side of Winnebago Lake, to the Stockbridge Munsee and Brothertown tribes; to the valuation and payment for their improvements, &»c. (ending with the words " and which lands are to be relinquished by said Indians?) They therefore assent to the same. Sncoun. The said chiefs and headmen of the Menominee nation of Indians, objecting to all the matters contained in the said proviso annexed to the resolution of the Senate of the United States, so far as the same relate to the running of a new line parallel to the south-western boundary line or course of the tract of five hundred thousand acres, de·· scribed in the first article of the treaty, and set apart for the New York Indians, to commence at a point on the southwestern side of Fox river, and one mile above the Grand Shute, on Fox river, and at a sufficient distance from the said boundary line, as established by the said first article, as shall comprehend the additional quantity of two hundred thousand acres of land, on and along the west side of the Fox river, without including any of the confirmed private land claims, on the Fox river, to compose a part of the five hundred thousand acres intended to be set apart for the Six Nations of the New York Indians and St. Regis tribe, agree in lieu of this proposition, to set off a like quantity of two hundred thousand acres as follows: The said Menominee nation hereby Cessicn of land agree to cede for the benefit of the New York Indians along the south- §°’dj`i°W Y°¥k western boundary line of the present five hundred thousand acres de- n °°°' scribed in the first article of the treaty as set apart for the New York Indians, a tract of land; bounded as follows. Beginning on the said Boundaries, treaty line, at the old mill dam on Fox river, and thence extending up along Fox river to the little Rapid Orcche; from thence running a northwest course three miles; thence on a line running parallel with the several courses of Fox river, and three miles distant from the river, until it will intersect a line, running on a northwest course, commencing at a point one mile above the Grand Shute; thence on a line running northwest, so far as will be necessary to include, between the said last line and the line described as the southwestern boundary line of the