Popular Science Monthly/Volume 38/April 1891/From Freedom to Bondage

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THE

POPULAR SCIENCE

MONTHLY.



APRIL, 1891.




FROM FREEDOM TO BONDAGE.[1]

By HERBERT SPENCER.

OF the many ways in which common-sense inferences about social affairs are flatly contradicted by events (as when measures taken to suppress a book cause increased circulation of it, or as when attempts to prevent usurious rates of interest make the terms harder for the borrower, or as when there is greater difficulty in getting things at the places of production than else-where) one of the most curious is the way in which the more things improve the louder become the exclamations about their badness.

In days when the people were without any political power, their subjection was rarely complained of; but after free institutions had so far advanced in England that our political arrangements were envied by continental peoples, the denunciations of aristocratic rule grew gradually stronger, until there came a great widening of the franchise, soon followed by complaints that things were going wrong for want of still further widening. If we trace up the treatment of women from the days of savagedom, when they bore all the burdens and after the men had eaten received such food as remained, up through the middle ages when they served the men at their meals, to our own day when throughout our social arrangements the claims of women are always put first, we see that along with the worst treatment there went the least apparent consciousness that the treatment was bad; while now that they are better treated than ever before,.the proclaiming of their grievances daily strengthens: the loudest outcries coming It

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from " the paradise of women," America. A century ago, when scarcely a man could be found who was not occasionally intoxi- cated, and when inability to take one or two bottles of wine brought contempt, no agitation arose against the vice of drunken- ness; but now that, in the course of fifty years, the voluntary efforts of temperance societies, joined with more general causes, have produced comparative sobriety, there are vociferous demands for laws to prevent the ruinous effects of the liquor traffic. Simi- larly again with education. A few generations back, ability to read and write was practically limited to the upper and middle classes, and the suggestion that the rudiments of culture should be given to laborers was never made, or, if made, ridiculed ; but when, in the days of our grandfathers, the Sunday-school system, initiated by a few philanthropists, began to spread and was fol- lowed by the establishment of day schools, with the result that among the masses those who could read and write were no longer the exceptions, and the demand for cheap literature rapidly in- creased, there began the cry that the people were perishing for lack of knowledge, and that the State must not simply educate them but must force education upon them.

And so it is, too, with the general state of the population in re- spect of food, clothing, shelter, and the appliances of life. Leaving out of the comparison early barbaric states, there has been a con- spicuous progress from the time when most rustics lived on barley bread, rye bread, and oatmeal, down to our own time when the consumption of white wheaten bread is universal from the days when coarse jackets reaching to the knees left the legs bare, down to the present day when laboring people, like their employers, have the whole body covered, by two or more layers of clothing from the old era of single-roomed huts without chimneys, or from the fifteenth century when even an ordinary gentleman's house was commonly without wainscot or plaster on its walls, down to the present century when every cottage has more rooms than one and the houses of artisans usually have several, while all have fireplaces, chimneys, and glazed windows, accompanied mostly by paper-hangings and painted doors; there has been, I say, a con- spicuous progress in the condition of the people. And this prog- ress has been still more marked within our own time. Any one who can look back sixty years, when the amount of pauperism was far greater than now and beggars abundant, is struck by the comparative size and finish of the new houses occupied by oper- ativesby the better dress of workmen, who wear broadcloth on Sundays, and that of servant girls, who vie with their mistresses by the higher standard of living which leads to a great demand for the best qualities of food by working people : all results of the double change to higher wages and cheaper commodities, and a

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distribution of taxes which, has relieved the lower classes at the expense of the upper classes. He is struck, too, by the contrast between the small space which popular welfare then occupied in public attention, and the large space it now occupies, with the result that outside and inside Parliament, plans to benefit the millions form the leading topics, and every one having means is expected to join in some philanthropic effort. Yet while eleva- tion, mental and physical, of the masses is going on far more rap- idly than ever before while the lowering of the death-rate proves that the average life is less trying, there swells louder and louder the cry that the evils are so great that nothing short of a social revolution can cure them. In presence of obvious improvements, joined with that increase of longevity which even alone yields conclusive proof of general amelioration, it is proclaimed, with increasing vehemence, that things are so bad that society must be pulled to pieces and reorganized on another plan. In this case, then, as in the previous cases instanced, in proportion as the evil decreases the denunciation of it increases ; and as fast as natural causes are shown to be powerful there grows up the belief that they are powerless.

Not that the evils to be remedied are small. Let no one sup- pose that, by emphasizing the above paradox, I wish to make light o^ the sufferings which most men have to bear. The fates of the great majority have ever been, and doubtless still are, so sad that it is painful to think of them. Unquestionably the existing type of social organization is one which none who care for their kind can contemplate with satisfaction ; and unquestionably men's activities accompanying this type are far from being ad- mirable. The strong divisions of rank and the immense inequali- ties of means, are at variance with that ideal of human relations on which the sympathetic imagination likes to dwell ; and the average conduct, under the pressure and excitement of social life as at present carried on, is in sundry respects repulsive. Though the many who revile competition strangely ignore the enormous benefits resulting from it though they forget that most of all the appliances and products distinguishing civilization from sav- agery, and making possible the maintenance of a large popula- tion on a small area, have been developed by the struggle for existence though they disregard the fact that while every man, as producer, suffers from the under-bidding of competitors, yet, as consumer, he is immensely advantaged by the cheapening of all he has to buy though they persist in dwelling on the evils of competition and saying nothing of its benefits ; yet it is not to be denied that the evils are great, and form a large set-off from the benefits. The system under which we at present live fosters dis- honesty and lying. It prompts adulterations of countless kinds ;

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it is answerable for the cheap imitations which eventually in many cases thrust the genuine articles out of the market ; it leads to the use of short weights and false measures ; it introduces bribery, which vitiates most trading relations, from those of the manufacturer and buyer down to those of the shopkeeper and servant ; it encourages deception to such an extent that an assist- ant who can not tell a falsehood with a good face is blamed ; and often it gives the conscientious trader the choice between adopt- ing the malpractices of his competitors, or greatly injuring his creditors by bankruptcy. Moreover, the extensive frauds, com- mon throughout the commercial world and daily exposed in law- courts and newspapers, are largely due to the pressure under which competition places the higher industrial classes; and are otherwise due to that lavish expenditure which, as implying suc- cess in the commercial struggle, brings honor. With these minor evils must be joined the major one, that the distribution achieved by the system, gives to those who regulate and superintend, a share of the total produce which bears too large a ratio to the share it gives to the actual workers. Let it not be thought, then, that in saying what I have said above, I under-estimate those vices of our competitive system which, thirty years ago, I de- scribed and denounced.* But it is not a question of absolute evils ; it is a question of relative evils whether the evils at pres- ent suffered are or are not less than the evils which would be suf- fered under another system whether efforts for mitigation along the lines thus far followed are not more likely to succeed than efforts along utterly different lines.

This is the question here to be considered. I must be excused for first of all setting forth sundry truths which are, to some at any rate, tolerably familiar, before proceeding to draw inferences which are not so familiar.

Speaking broadly, every man works that he may avoid suffer- ing. Here, remembrance of the pangs of hunger prompts him ; and there, he is prompted by the sight of the slave-driver's lash. His immediate dread may be the punishment which physical cir- cumstances will inflict, or may be punishment inflicted by human agency. He must have a master ; but the master may be Nature or may be a fellow-man. When he is under the impersonal coer- cion of Nature, we say that he is free ; and when he is under the personal coercion of some one above him, we call him, according to the degree of his dependence, a slave, a serf, or a vassal. Of course I omit the small minority who inherit means: an inci- dental, and not a necessary, social element. I speak only of the vast majority, both cultured and uncultured, who maintain them-

��* See essay on The Morals of Trade.

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selves by labor, bodily or mental, and must either exert them- selves of their own unconstrained wills, prompted only by thoughts of naturally-resulting evils or benefits, or must exert themselves with constrained wills, prompted by thoughts of evils and benefits artificially resulting.

Men may work together in a society under either of these two forms of control : forms which, though in many cases mingled, are essentially contrasted. Using the word co-operation in its wide sense, and not in that restricted sense now commonly given to it, we may say that social life must be carried on by either vol- untary co-operation or compulsory co-operation; or, to use Sir Henry Maine's words, the system must be that of contract or that of status that in which the individual is left to do the best he can by his spontaneous efforts and get success or failure accord- ing to his efficiency, and that in which he has his appointed place, works under coercive rule, and has his apportioned share of food, clothing, and shelter.

The system of voluntary co-operation is that by which, in civ- ilized societies, industry is now everywhere carried on. Under a simple form we have it on every farm, where the laborers, paid by the farmer himself and taking orders directly from him, are free to stay or go as they please. And of its more complex form an example is yielded by every manufacturing concern, in which, under partners, come clerks and managers, and under these, time- keepers and over-lookers, and under these operatives of different grades. In each of these cases there is an obvious working to- gether, or co-operation, of employer and employed, to obtain in one case a crop and in the other case a manufactured stock. And then, at the same time, there is a far more extensive, though un- conscious, co-operation with other workers of all grades through- out the society. For while these particular employers and em- ployed are severally occupied with their special kinds of work, other employers and employed are making other things needed for the carrying on of their lives as well as the lives of all others. This voluntary co-operation, from its simplest to its most complex forms, has the common trait that those concerned work together by consent. There is no one to force terms or to force acceptance. It is perfectly true that in many cases an employer may give, or an employe' may accept, with reluctance : circumstances he says compel him. But what are the circumstances ? In the one case there are goods ordered, or a contract entered into, which he can not supply or execute without yielding ; and in the other case he submits to a wage less than he likes because otherwise he will have no money wherewith to procure food and warmth. The gen- eral formula is not " Do this, or I will make you " ; but it is " Do this, or leave your place and take the consequences."

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On the other hand compulsory co-operation is exemplified by an army not so much by our own army, the service in which is under agreement for a specified period, but in a continental army, raised by conscription. Here, in time of peace the daily duties cleaning, parade, drill, sentry work, and the rest and in time of war the various actions of the camp and the battle-field, are done under command, without room for any exercise of choice. Up from the private soldier through the non-commissioned officers and the half-dozen or more grades of commissioned officers, the universal law is absolute obedience from the grade below to the grade above. The sphere of individual will is such only as is allowed by the will of the superior. Breaches of subordination are, according to their gravity, dealt with by deprivation of leave, extra drill, imprisonment, flogging, and, in the last resort, shoot- ing. Instead of the understanding that there must be obedience in respect of specified duties under pain of dismissal, the under- standing now is " Obey in everything ordered under penalty of inflicted suffering and perhaps death."

This form of co-operation, still exemplified in an army, has in days gone by been the form of co-operation throughout the civil population. Everywhere, and at all times, chronic war generates a militant type of structure, not in the body of soldiers only, but throughout the community at large. Practically, while the con- flict between societies is actively going on, and fighting is regarded as the only manly occupation, the society is the quiescent army and the army the mobilized society : that part which does not take part in battle, composed of slaves, serfs, women, etc., consti- tuting the commissariat. Naturally, therefore, throughout the mass of inferior individuals constituting the commissariat, there- is maintained a system of discipline identical in nature if less elaborate. The fighting body being, under such conditions, the ruling body, and the rest of the community being incapable of resistance, those who control the fighting body will, of course, impose their control upon the non-fighting body ; and the regime of coercion will be applied to it with such modifications only as the different circumstances involve. Prisoners of war become slaves. Those who were free cultivators before the conquest of their country, become serfs attached to the soil. Petty chiefs become subject to superior chiefs ; these smaller lords become vassals to over-lords ; and so on up to the highest : the social ranks and powers being of like essential nature with the ranks and powers throughout the military organization. And while for the slaves compulsory co-operation is the unqualified system, a co-operation which is in part compulsory is the system that per- vades all grades above. Each man's oath of fealty to his suzerain takes the form " I am your man."

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Throughout Europe, and especially in our own country, this system of compulsory co-operation gradually relaxed in rigor, while the system of voluntary co-operation step by step replaced it. As fast as war ceased to be the business of life, the social structure produced by war and appropriate to it, slowly became qualified by the social structure produced by industrial life and appropriate to it. In proportion as a decreasing part of the com- munity was devoted to offensive and defensive activities, an in- creasing part became devoted to production and distribution. Growing more numerous, more powerful, and taking refuge in towns where it was less under the power of the militant class, this industrial population carried on its life under the system of voluntary co-operation. Though municipal governments and guild-regulations, partially pervaded by ideas and usages derived from the militant type of society, were in some degree coercive ; yet production and distribution were in the main carried on under agreement alike between buyers and sellers, and between mas- ters and workmen. As fast as these social relations and forms of activity became dominant in urban populations, they influenced the whole community : compulsory co-operation lapsed more and more, through money commutation for services, military and civil ; while divisions of rank became less rigid and class-power dimin- ished. Until at length, restraints exercised by incorporated trades have fallen into desuetude, as well as the rule of rank over rank, voluntary co-operation became the universal principle. Purchase and sale became the law for all kinds of services as well as for all kinds of commodities.

The restlessness generated by pressure against the conditions of existence, perpetually prompts the desire to try a new posi- tion. Every one knows how long-continued rest in one attitude becomes wearisome every one has found how even the best easy- chair, at first rejoiced in, becomes after many hours intolerable ; and change to a hard seat, previously occupied and rejected, seems for a time to be a great relief. It is the same with incor- porated humanity. Having by long struggles emancipated itself from the hard discipline of the ancient regime, and having dis- covered that the new regime into which it has grown, though relatively easy, is not without stresses and pains, its impatience with these prompts the wish to try another system ; which other system is, in principle if not in appearance, the same as that which during past generations was escaped from with much re- joicing.

For as fast as the regime of contract is discarded the regime of status is of necessity adopted. As fast as voluntary co-opera- tion is abandoned compulsory co-operation must be substituted. Some kind of organization labor must have ; and if it is not that

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which, arises by agreement under free competition, it must he that which is imposed by authority. Unlike in appearance and names as it may be to the old order of slaves and serfs, working under masters, who were coerced by barons, who were themselves vassals of dukes or kings, the new order wished for, constituted by workers under foremen of small groups, overlooked by super- intendents, who are subject to higher local managers, who are controlled by superiors of districts, themselves under a central government, must be essentially the same in principle. In one case, as in the other, there must be established grades, and enforced subordination of each grade to the grades above. This is a truth which the communist or the socialist does not dwell upon. Angry with the existing system under which each of us takes care of himself, while all of us see that each has fair play, he thinks how much better it would be for all of us to take care of each of us ; and he refrains from thinking of the machinery by which this is to be done. Inevitably, if each is to be cared for by all, then the embodied all must get the means the necessaries of life. What it gives to each must be taken from the accumulated contribu- tions ; and it must therefore require from each his proportion must tell him how much he has to give to the general stock in the shape of production, that he may have so much in the shape of sustentation. Hence, before he can be provided for, he must put himself under orders, and obey those who say what he shall do, and at what hours, and where ; and who give him his share of food, clothing, and shelter. If competition is excluded, and with it buying and selling, there can be no voluntary exchange of so much labor for so much produce ; but there must be apportion- ment of the one to the other by appointed officers. This appor- tionment must be enforced. Without alternative the work must be done, and without alternative the benefit, whatever it may be, must be accepted. For the worker may not leave his place at will and offer himself elsewhere. Under such a system he can not be accepted elsewhere, save by order of the authorities. And it is manifest that a standing order would forbid employment in one place of an insubordinate member from another place: the system could not be worked if the workers were severally allowed to go or come as they pleased. With corporals and sergeants under them, the captains of industry must carry out the orders of their colonels, and these of their generals, up to the council of the commander-in-chief ; and obedience must be required throughout the industrial army as throughout a fighting army. " Do your prescribed duties, and take your apportioned rations," must be the rule of the one as of the other.

"Well, be it so," replies the socialist. "The workers will appoint their own officers, and these will always be subject to

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criticisms of the mass they regulate. Being thus in fear of pub- lic opinion, they will be sure to act judiciously and fairly ; or when they do not, will be deposed by the popular vote, local or general. Where will be the grievance of being under superiors, when the superiors themselves are under democratic control ? " And in this attractive vision the socialist has full belief.

Iron and brass are simpler things than flesh and blood, and dead wood than living nerve ; and a machine constructed of the one works in more definite ways than an organism constructed of the other, especially when the machine is worked by the inor- ganic forces of steam or water, while the organism is worked by the forces of living nerve-centers. Manifestly, then, the ways in which the machine will work are much more readily calculable than the ways in which the organism will work. Yet in how few cases does the inventor foresee rightly the actions of his new apparatus! Read the patent-list, and it will be found that not more than one device in fifty turns out to be of any service. Plausible as his scheme seemed to the inventor, one or other hitch prevents the intended operation, and brings out a widely different result from that which he wished.

What, then, shall we say of these schemes which have to do not with dead matters and forces, but with complex living organ- isms working in ways less readily foreseen, and which involve the co-operation of multitudes of such organisms ? Even the units out of which this re-arranged body politic is to be formed are often incomprehensible. Every one is from time to time sur- prised by others' behavior, and even by the deeds of relatives who are best known to him. Seeing, then, how uncertainly any one can foresee the actions of an individual, how can he with any certainty foresee the operation of a social structure ? He proceeds on the assumption that all concerned will judge rightly and act fairly will think as they ought to think, and act as they ought to act ; and he assumes this regardless of the daily experiences which show him that men do neither the one nor the other, and forgetting that the complaints he makes against the existing sys- tem show his belief to be that men have neither the wisdom nor the rectitude which his plan requires them to have.

Paper constitutions raise smiles on the faces of those who have observed their results ; and paper social systems similarly affect those who have contemplated the available evidence. How little i<he men who wrought the French revolution and were chiefly concerned in setting up the new governmental apparatus, dreamt that one of the early actions of this apparatus would be to behead them all ! How little the men who drew up the Amer- ican Declaration of Independence and framed the Republic, an- ticipated that after some generations the legislature would lapse

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into the hands of wire-pullers ; that its doings would turn upon the contests of office-seekers ; that political action would be every- where vitiated by the intrusiou of a foreign element holding the balance between parties ; that electors, instead of judging for themselves, would habitually be led to the polls in thousands by their " bosses " ; and that respectable men would be driven out of public life by the insults and slanders of professional politicians. Nor were there better previsions in those who gave constitutions to the various other states of the New "World, in which un- numbered revolutions have shown with wonderful persistence the contrasts between the expected results of political systems and the achieved results. It has been no less thus with proposed systems of social re-organization, so far as they have been tried. Save where celibacy has been insisted on, their history has been everywhere one of disaster; ending with the history of Cabet's Icarian colony lately given by one of its members, Madame Fleury Robinson, in The Open Court a history of splittings, re-split- tings, re-re-splittings, accompanied by numerous individual seces- sions and final dissolution. And for the failure of such social schemes, as for the failure of the political schemes, there has been one general cause.

' Metamorphosis is the universal law, exemplified throughout the Heavens and on the Earth : especially throughout the organic world ; and above all in the animal division of it. No creature, save the simplest and most minute, commences its existence in a form like that which it eventually assumes ; and in most cases the unlikeness is great so great that kinship between the first and the last forms would be incredible were it not daily demonstrated in every poultry -yard and every garden. More than this is true. The changes of form are often several: each of them being an apparently complete transformation egg, larva, pupa, imago, for example. And this universal metamorphosis, displayed alike in the development of a planet and of every seed which germinates on its surface, holds also of societies, whether taken as wholes or in their separate institutions. No one of them ends as it begins ; and the difference between its original structure and its ultimate structure is such that, at the outset, change of the one into the other would have seemed incredible. In the rudest tribe the chief, obeyed as leader in war, loses his distinctive position when the fighting is over ; and even where continued warfare has produced permanent chieftainship, the chief, building his own hut, getting his own food, making his own implements, differs from others only by his predominant influence. There is no sign that in course of time, by conquests and unions of tribes, and consolida- tions of clusters so formed with other such clusters, until a nation has been produced, there will originate from the primitive chief,

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one who, as czar or emperor, surrounded with pomp and cere- mony, has despotic power over scores of millions, exercised through hundreds of thousands of soldiers and hundreds of thou- sands of officials. When the early Christian missionaries, having humble externals and passing self-denying lives, spread over pagan Europe, preaching forgiveness of injuries and the re- turning of good for evil, no one dreamt that in course of time their representatives would form a vast hierarchy, possessing everywhere a large part of the land, distinguished by the haughti- ness of its members grade above grade, ruled by military bishops who led their retainers to battle, and headed by a pope exercising supreme power over kings. So, too, has it been with that very industrial system which many are now so eager to replace. In its original form there was no prophecy of the factory system or kindred organizations of workers. Differing from them only as being the head of his house, the master worked along with his apprentices and a journeyman or two, sharing with them his table and accommodation, and himself selling their joint produce. Only with industrial growth did there come employ- ment of a larger number of assistants and a relinquishment, on the part of the master, of all other business than that of super- intendence. And only in the course of recent times did there evolve the organizations under which the labors of hundreds and thousands of men receiving wages, are regulated by various orders of paid officials under a single or multiple head. These originally small, semi-socialistic, groups of producers, like the compound families or house-communities of early ages, slowly dissolved because they could not hold their ground: the larger establishments, with better subdivision of labor, succeeded be- cause .they ministered to the wants of society more effectually. But we need not go back through the centuries to trace transfor- mations sufficiently great and unexpected. On the day when 30,000 a year in aid of education was voted as an experiment, the name of idiot would have been given to an opponent who prophesied that in fifty years the sum spent through imperial taxes and local rates would amount to 10,000,000, or who said that the aid to education would be followed by aids to feeding and clothing, or who said that parents and children, alike de- prived of all option, would, even if starving, be compelled by fine or imprisonment to conform, and receive that which, with papal assumption, the State calls education. No one, I say, would have - dreamt that out of so innocent-looking a germ would have so quickly evolved this tyrannical system, tamely submitted to by people who fancy themselves free.

Thus in social arrangements, as in all other things, change is inevitable. It is foolish to suppose that new institutions set up,

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will long retain the character given them by those who set them up. Rapidly or slowly they will be transformed into institutions unlike those intended so unlike as even to be unrecognizable by their devisers. And what, in the case before us, will be the meta- morphosis ? The answer pointed to by instances above given, and warranted by various analogies, is manifest.

A cardinal trait in all advancing organization is the develop- ment of the regulative apparatus. If the parts of a whole are to act together, there must be appliances by which their actions are directed ; and in proportion as the whole is large and complex, and has many requirements to be met by many agencies, the directive apparatus must be extensive, elaborate, and powerful. That it is thus with individual organisms needs no saying ; and that it must be thus with social organisms is obvious. Beyond the regulative apparatus such as in our own society is required for carrying on national defense and maintaining public order and personal safety, there must, under the regime of socialism, be a regulative apparatus everywhere controlling all kinds of produc- tion and distribution, and everywhere apportioning the shares of products of each kind required for each locality, each working establishment, each individual. Under our existing voluntary co-operation, with its free contracts and its competition, produc- tion and distribution need no official oversight. Demand and supply, and the desire of each man to gain a living by supplying the needs of his fellows, spontaneously evolve that wonderful system whereby a great city has its food daily brought round to all doors or stored at adjacent shops; has clothing for its citi- zens everywhere at hand in multitudinous varieties; has its houses and furniture and fuel ready made or stocked in each locality ; and has mental pabulum from halfpenny papers, hourly hawked round, to weekly shoals of novels, and less abundant books of instruction, furnished without stint for small payments. And throughout the kingdom, production as well as 'distribution is similarly carried on with the smallest amount of superintend- ence which proves efficient ; while the quantities of the numerous commodities required daily in each locality are adjusted without any other agency than the pursuit of profit. Suppose now that this industrial regime of willinghood, acting spontaneously, is replaced by a regime of industrial obedience, enforced by public officials. Imagine the vast administration required for that dis- tribution of all commodities to all people in every city, town, and village, which is now effected by traders ! Imagine, again, the still more vast administration required for doing all that farmers, manufacturers, and merchants do ; having not only its various orders of local superintendents, but its sub-centers and chief centers needed for apportioning the quantities of each thing every-

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where needed, and the adjustment of them to the requisite times. Then add the staffs wanted for working mines, railways, roads, canals ; the staffs required for conducting the importing and ex- porting businesses and the administration of mercantile shipping ; the staffs required for supplying towns not only with water and gas but with locomotion by tramways, omnibuses, and other vehicles, and for the distribution of power, electric and other. Join with these the existing postal, telegraphic, and telephonic administrations; and finally those of the police and army, by which the dictates of this immense consolidated regulative system are to be everywhere enforced. Imagine all this and then ask what will be the position of the actual workers ! Already on the continent, where governmental organizations are more elaborate and coercive than here, there are chronic complaints of the tyranny of bureaucracies the hauteur and brutality of their members. What will these become when not only the more public actions of citizens are controlled, but there is added this far more extensive control of all their respective daily duties ? "What will happen when the various divisions of this vast army of officials, united by interests common to officialism the inter- ests of the regulators versus those of the regulated have at their command whatever force is needful to suppress insubordination and act as " saviors of society " ? "Where will be the actual diggers and miners and smelters and weavers, when those who order and superintend, everywhere arranged class above class, have come, after some generations, to intermarry with those of kindred grades, under feelings such as are operative in existing classes ; and when there have been so produced a series of castes rising in superiority ; and when all these, having everything in their own power, have arranged modes of living for their own advantage : eventually forming a new aristocracy far more elab- orate and better organized than the old ? How will the indi- vidual worker fare if he is dissatisfied with his treatment thinks that he has not an adequate share of the products, or has more to do than can rightly be demanded, or wishes to undertake a function for which he feels himself fitted but which is not thought proper for him by his superiors, or desires to make an independent career for himself ? This dissatisfied unit in the immense machine will be told he must submit or go. The mildest penalty for disobedience will be industrial ex- communication. And if an international organization of labor is formed as proposed, exclusion in one country will mean exclusion in all others industrial excommunication will mean starvation.

That things must take this course is a conclusion reached not by deduction only, nor only by induction from those experiences

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of the past instanced above, nor only from consideration of the analogies furnished by organisms of all orders ; but it is reached also by observation of cases daily under our eyes. The truth that the regulative structure always tends to increase in power, is illustrated by every established body of men. The history of each learned society, or society for other purpose, shows how the staff, permanent or partially permanent, sways the proceedings and determines the actions of the society with but little resist- ance, even when most members of the society disapprove: the repugnance to anything like a revolutionary step being ordinarily an efficient deterrent. So is it with joint-stock companies those owning railways for example. The plans of a board of directors are usually authorized with little or no discussion ; and if there is any considerable opposition, this is forthwith crushed by an overwhelming number of proxies sent by those who always sup- port the existing administration. Only when the misconduct is extreme does the resistance of shareholders suffice to displace the ruling body. Nor is it otherwise with societies formed of work- ingmen and having the interests of labor especially at heart the Trades Unions. In these, too, the regulative agency becomes all- powerful. Their members, even when they dissent from the pol- icy pursued, habitually yield to the authorities they have set up. As they can not secede without making enemies of their fellow- workmen, and often losing all chance of employment, they suc- cumb. We are shown, too, by the late congress, that already in the general organization of Trades Unions so recently formed, there are complaints of " wire-pullers " and " bosses " and " perma- nent officials." If, then, this supremacy of the regulators is seen in bodies of quite modern origin, formed of men who have, in many of the cases instanced, unhindered powers of asserting their independence, what will the supremacy of the regulators be- come in long - established bodies, in bodies which have grown vast and highly organized, and in bodies which, instead of con- trolling only a small part of the unit's life, control the whole of his life ?

Again there will come the rejoinder " We shall guard against all that. Everybody will be educated ; and all, with their eyes constantly open to the abuse of power, will be quick to prevent it." The worth of these expectations would be small even could we not identify the causes which will bring disap- pointment ; for in human affairs the most promising schemes go wrong in ways which no one anticipated. But in this case the going wrong will be necessitated by causes which are conspicu- ous. The working of institutions is determined by men's char- acters ; and the existing defects in their characters will inevitably bring about the results above indicated. There is no adequate

�� � FROM FREEDOM TO BONDAGE. 735

endowment of those sentiments required to prevent the growth of a despotic bureaucracy.

Were it needful to dwell on indirect evidence, much might be made of that furnished by the behavior of the so-called Liberal party a party which, relinquishing the original conception of a leader as a mouthpiece for a known and accepted policy, thinks itself bound to accept a policy which its leader springs upon it without consent or warning a party so utterly without the feel- ing and idea implied by liberalism, as not to resent this tram- pling on the right of private judgment which constitutes the root of liberalism nay, a party which vilifies as renegade liberals, those of its members who refuse to surrender their independence ! But without occupying space with indirect proofs that the mass of men have not the natures required to check the development of tyrannical officialism, it will suffice to contemplate the direct proofs furnished by those classes among whom the socialistic idea most predominates, and who think themselves most interested in propagating it the operative classes. These would constitute the great body of socialistic organization, and their characters would determine its nature. What, then, are their characters as displayed in such organizations as they have already formed ?

Instead of the selfishness of the employing classes and the selfishness of competition, we are to have the unselfishness of a mutual-aiding system. How far is this unselfishness now shown in the behavior of workingmen to one another ? What shall we say to the rules limiting the numbers of new hands admitted into each trade, or to the rules which hinder ascent from inferior classes of workers to superior classes ? One does not see in such regulations any of that altruism by which socialism is to be per- vaded. Contrariwise, one sees a pursuit of private interests no less keen than among traders. Hence, unless we suppose that men's natures will be suddenly exalted, we must conclude that the pursuit of private interests will sway the doings of all the component classes in a socialistic society.

With passive disregard of others' claims goes active encroach- ment on them. " Be one of us or we will cut off your means of living," is the usual threat of each Trades Union to outsiders of the same trade. While their members insist on their own free- dom to combine and fix the rates at which they will work (as they are perfectly justified in doing), the freedom of those who disa- gree with them is not only denied but the assertion of it is treated as a crime. Individuals who maintain their rights to make their own contracts are vilified as "blacklegs" and "traitors," and meet with violence which would be merciless were there no legal penalties and no police. Along with this trampling on the liber- ties of men of their own class, there goes peremptory dictation to

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the employing class : not prescribed terms and working arrange- ments only shall be conformed to, but none save those belonging to their body shall be employed nay, in some cases, there shall be a strike if the employer carries on transactions with trading bodies that give work to non-union men. Here, then, we are variously shown by Trades Unions, or at any rate by the newer Trades Unions, a determination to impose their regulations with- out regard to the rights of those who are to be coerced. So com- plete is the inversion of ideas and sentiments that maintenance of these rights is regarded as vicious and trespass upon them as virtuous.*

Along with this aggressiveness in one direction there goes submissiveness in another direction. The coercion of outsiders by unionists is paralleled only by their subjection to their lead- ers. That they may conquer in the struggle they surrender their individual liberties and individual judgments, and show no re- sentment however dictatorial may be the rule exercised over them. Everywhere we see such subordination that bodies of workmen unanimously leave their work or return to it as their authorities order them. Nor do they resist when taxed all round to support strikers whose acts they may or may not approve, but instead, ill-treat recalcitrant members of their body who do not subscribe.

The traits thus shown must be operative in any new social organization, and the question to be asked is What will result from their operation when they are relieved from all restraints ? At present the separate bodies of men displaying them are in the midst of a society partially passive, partially antagonistic ; are subject to the criticisms and reprobations of an independent press ; and are under the control of law, enforced by police. If in these circumstances these bodies habitually take courses which override individual freedom, what will happen when, instead of being only scattered parts of the community, governed by their

��* Marvelous are the conclusions men reach when once they desert the simple principle, that each man should be allowed to pursue the objects of life, restrained only by the lim- its which the similar pursuits of their objects by other men impose. A generation ago we heard loud assertions of " the right to labor," that is, the right to have labor provided ; and there are still not a few who think the community bound to find work for each person. Compare this with the doctrine current in France at the time when the monarchical power culminated ; namely, that " the right of working is a royal right which the prince can sell and the subjects must buy." This contrast is startling enough ; but a contrast still more startling is being provided for us. We now see a resuscitation of the despotic doctrine, differing only by the substitution of Trades Unions for kings. For now that Trades Unions are becoming universal, and each artisan has to pay prescribed moneys to one or another of them, with the alternative of being a non-unionist to whom work is denied by force, it has come to this, that the right to labor is a Trade-Union right, which the Trade Union can sell and the individual worker must buy !

�� � FROM FREEDOM TO BONDAGE. 737

separate sets of regulators, they constitute the whole community, governed by a consolidated system of such regulators, when func- tionaries of all orders, including those who officer the press, form parts of the regulative organization ; and when the law is both enacted and administered by this regulative organization ? The fanatical adherents of a social theory are capable of taking any measures, no matter how extreme, for carrying out their views : holding, like the merciless priesthoods of past times, that the end justifies the means. And when a general socialistic organization has been established, the vast, ramified, and consolidated body of those who direct its activities, using without check whatever co- ercion seems to them needful in the interests of the system (which will practically become their own interests), will have no hesitation in imposing their rigorous rule over the entire lives of the actual workers ; until, eventually, there is developed an offi- cial oligarchy, with its various grades, exercising a tyranny more gigantic and more terrible than any which the world has seen.

Let me again repudiate an erroneous inference. Any one who supposes that the foregoing argument implies contentment with things as they are, makes a profound mistake. The present social state is transitional, as past social states have been transitional. There will, I hope and believe, come a future social state differing as much from the present as the present differs from the past with its mailed barons and defenseless serfs. In Social Statics, as well as in The Study of Sociology and in Political Institutions, is clearly shown the desire for an organization more conducive to the happiness of men at large than that which exists. My oppo- sition to socialism results from the belief that it would stop the progress to such a higher state and bring back a lower state. Nothing but the slow modification of human nature by the discipline of social life, can produce permanently advantageous changes.

A fundamental error pervading the thinking of nearly all parties, political and social, is that evils admit of immediate and radical remedies. " If you will but do this, the mischief will be prevented." "Adopt my plan and the suffering will disappear." " The corruption will unquestionably be cured by enforcing this measure." Everywhere one meets with beliefs, expressed or implied, of these kinds. They are all ill-founded. It is possible to remove causes which intensify the evils ; it is possible to change the evils from one form into another ; and it is possible, and very common, to exacerbate the evils by the efforts made to prevent them ; but anything like immediate cure is im- possible. In the course of thousands of years mankind have, by multiplication, been forced out of that original savage state in which small numbers supported themselves on wild food, into the

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civilized state in which the food required for supporting great numbers can be got only by continuous labor. The nature re- quired for this last mode of life is widely different from the nature required for the first ; and long-continued pains have to be passed through in remolding the one into the other. Misery has neces- sarily to be borne by a constitution out of harmony with its con- ditions ; and a constitution inherited from primitive men is out of harmony with the conditions imposed on existing men. Hence it is impossible to establish forthwith a satisfactory social state. No such nature as that which has filled Europe with millions of armed men, here eager for conquest and there for revenge no such nature as that which prompts the nations called Christian to vie with one another in filibustering expeditions all over the world, regardless of the claims of aborigines, while their tens of thousands of priests of the religion of love look on approvingly no such nature as that which, in dealing with weaker races, goes beyond the primitive rule of life for life, and for one life takes many lives no such nature, I say, can, by any device, be framed into a harmonious community. The root of all well-ordered social action is a sentiment of justice, which at once insists on personal freedom and is solicitous for the like freedom of others ; and there at present exists but a very inadequate amount of this sentiment.

Hence the need for further long continuance of a social dis- cipline which requires each man to carry on his activities with due regard to the like claims of others to carry on their activities ; and which, while it insists that he shall have all the benefits his conduct naturally brings, insists also that he shall not saddle on others the evils his conduct naturally brings : unless they freely undertake to bear them. And hence the belief that endeavors to elude this discipline will not only fail, but will bring worse evils than those to be escaped.

It is not, then, chiefly in the interests of the employing classes that socialism is to be resisted, but much more in the interests of the employed classes. In one way or other production must be regulated ; and the regulators, in the nature of things, must al- ways be a small class as compared with the actual producers. Un- der voluntary co-operation as at present carried on, the regulators, pursuing their personal interests, take as large a share of the produce as they can get ; but, as we are daily shown by Trades- Union successes, are restrained in the selfish pursuit of their ends. Under that compulsory co-operation which socialism would neces- sitate, the regulators, pursuing their personal interests with no less selfishness, could not be met by the combined resistance of free workers ; and their power, unchecked as now by refusals to work save on prescribed terms, would grow and ramify and con- solidate till it became irresistible. The ultimate result, as I have

�� � before pointed out, must be a society like that of ancient Peru, dreadful to contemplate, in which the mass of the people, elaborately regimented in groups of 10, 50, 100, 500, and 1,000, ruled by officers of corresponding grades, and tied to their districts, were superintended in their private lives as well as in their industries, and toiled hopelessly for the support of the governmental organization.


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  1. Introduction to a Collection of Essays entitled A Plea for Liberty; An Argument against Socialism and Socialistic Legislation. Consisting of essays by various writers. Edited by Dr. Thomas Mackay. New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1891.