Prior Analytics

From Wikisource
Jump to: navigation, search
Organon by Aristotle, translated by Octavius Freire Owen
Prior Analytics
(1853) Translator's annotations not included.

Book 1
Book 2

Concise Table of Contents[edit]

Book 1

Chap. 1. Of Proposition, Term, Syllogism, and its Elements.
Chap. 2. On the Conversion of Propositions.
Chap. 3. On the Conversion of Modal Propositions.
Chap. 4. Of Syllogism, and of the first Figure.
Chap. 5. Of the second Figure.
Chap. 6. Of Syllogisms in the third Figure.
Chap. 7. Of the three first Figures, and of the Completion of Incomplete Syllogisms.
Chap. 8. Of Syllogisms derived from two necessary Propositions.
Chap. 9. Of Syllogisms, whereof one Proposition is necessary, and the other pure in the first Figure.
Chap. 10. Of the same in the second Figure.
Chap. 11. Of the same in the third Figure.
Chap. 12. A comparison of pure with necessary Syllogisms.
Chap. 13. Of the Contingent, and its concomitant Propositions.
Chap. 14. Of Syllogisms with two contingent Propositions in the first Figure.
Chap. 15. Of Syllogisms with one simple and another contingent Proposition in the first Figure.
Chap. 16. Of Syllogisms with one Premise necessary, and the other contingent in the first Figure.
Chap. 17. Of Syllogisms with two contingent Premises in the second Figure.
Chap. 18. Of Syllogisms with one Proposition simple, and the other contingent, in the second Figure.
Chap. 19. Of Syllogisms with one Premise necessary and the other contingent, in the second Figure.
Chap. 20. Of Syllogisms with both Propositions contingent in the third Figure.
Chap. 21. Of Syllogisms with one Proposition contingent and the other simple in the third Figure.
Chap. 22. Of Syllogisms with one Premise necessary, and the other contingent in the third Figure.
Chap. 23. It is demonstrated that every Syllogism is completed by the first Figure.
Chap. 24. Of the Quality and Quantity of the Premises in Syllogism.—Of the Conclusion.
Chap. 25. Every Syllogism consists of only three Terms, and of two Premises.
Chap. 26. On the comparative Difficulty of certain Problems, and by what Figures they are proved.
Chap. 27. Of the Invention and Construction of Syllogisms.
Chap. 28. Special Rules upon the same Subject.
Chap. 29. The same Method applied to other than categorical Syllogisms.
Chap. 30. The preceding method of Demonstration applicable to all Problems.
Chap. 31. Upon Division; and its Imperfection as to Demonstration.
Chap. 32. Reduction of Syllogisms to the above Figures.
Chap. 33. On Error, arising from the quantity of Propositions.
Chap. 34. Error arising from inaccurate exposition of Terms.
Chap. 35. Middle not always to be assumed as a particular thing, ὡς τόδε τι.
Chap. 36. On the arrangement of Terms, according to nominal appellation; and of Propositions according to case.
Chap. 37. Rules of Reference to the forms of Predication.
Chap. 38. Of Propositional Iteration and the Addition to a Predicate.
Chap. 39. The Simplification of Terms in the Solution of Syllogism.
Chap. 40. The definite Article to be added according to the nature of the Conclusion.
Chap. 41. On the Distinction of certain forms of Universal Predication.
Chap. 42. That not all Conclusions in the same Syllogism are produced through one Figure.
Chap. 43. Of Arguments against Definition, simplified.
Chap. 44. Of the Reduction of Hypotheticals and of Syllogisms ad impossibile.
Chap. 45. The Reduction of Syllogisms from one Figure to another.
Chap. 46. Of the Quality and Signification of the Definite, and Indefinite, and Privative.

Book 2

Chap. 1. Recapitulation.—Of the Conclusions of certain Syllogisms.
Chap. 2. On a true Conclusion deduced from false Premises in the first Figure.
Chap. 3. The same in the middle Figure.
Chap. 4. Similar Observations upon a true Conclusion from false Premises in the third Figure.
Chap. 5. Of Demonstration in a Circle, in the first Figure.
Chap. 6. Of the same in the second Figure.
Chap. 7. Of the same in the third Figure.
Chap. 8. Of Conversion of Syllogisms in the first Figure.
Chap. 9. Of Conversion of Syllogisms in the second Figure.
Chap. 10. Of the same in the third Figure.
Chap. 11. Of Deduction to the Impossible in the first Figure.
Chap. 12. Of the same in the second Figure.
Chap. 13. Of the same in the third Figure.
Chap. 14. Of the difference between the Ostensive, and the Deduction to the Impossible.
Chap. 15. Of the Method of concluding from Opposites in the several Figures.
Chap. 16. Of the "Petitio Principii," or Begging the Question.
Chap. 17. A Consideration of the Syllogism, in which it is argued, that the false does not happen—"on account of this," παρὰ τοῦτο συμβαίνειν, τὸ ψεῦδος
Chap. 18. Of false Reasoning.
Chap. 19. Of the Prevention of a Catasyllogism.
Chap. 20. Of the Elenchus.
Chap. 21. Of Deception, as to Supposition—κατὰ τὴν ὑπόληψιν
Chap. 22. On the Conversion of the Extremes in the first Figure.
Chap. 23. Of Induction.
Chap. 24. Of Example.
Chap. 25. Of Abduction.
Chap. 26. Of Objection.
Chap. 27. Of Likelihood, Sign, and Enthymeme.

This is a translation and has a separate copyright status from the original text. The license for the translation applies to this edition only.
Original:
This work published before January 1, 1923 is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.
 
Translation:
This work published before January 1, 1923 is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.