Proclamation of October 5, 1881 (Supplemental)

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Proclamation of October 5, 1881 (Supplemental)
by Chester A. Arthur

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas a supplemental treaty between the United States of America and China, for supplying certain points of incompleteness in the existing treaties between the two governments in the matter of commercial intercourse and judicial procedure, was concluded and signed at Peking, in English and Chinese languages, on the seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty, the original of the English text of which treaty is word for word as follows:

The President of the United States of America and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, because of certain points of incompleteness in the existing treaties between the two governments, have named as their commissioners plenipotentiary, that is to say:

The President of the United States, James B. Angell of Michigan, John F. Swift of California, and William Henry Trescot of South Carolina;

His Imperial Majesty, the Emperor of China, Pao Chun, a member of His Imperial Majesty's privy council and superintendent of the board of civil office, and Li Hungtsao, a member of His Imperial Majesty's privy council, who have agreed upon and concluded the following additional articles:

ARTICLE I.

The Government of the United States and China, recognizing the benefits of their past commercial relations, and in order still further to promote such relations between the citizens and subjects of the two powers, mutually agree to give the most careful and favorable attention to the representative of either as to such special extension of commercial intercourse as either may desire.

ARTICLE II.

The Governments of China and the United States mutually agree and undertake that Chinese subjects shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the ports of the United States; and citizens of the United States shall not be permitted to import into any of the open ports of China; to transport it from one open port to any other open port; or to buy and sell opium in any of the open ports of China. This absolute prohibition, which extends to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either power, to foreign vessels employed by them, or to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either power and employed by other persons for the transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriate legislation on the part of China and the United States; and the benefits of the favored nation clause in existing treaties shall not be claimed by the citizens or subjects of either power as against the provisions of this article.

ARTICLE III.

His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China hereby promises and agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues, or duties for imports or exports, or coastwise trade shall be imposed or levied in the open ports of China upon vessels wholly belonging to citizens of the United States; or upon the produce, manufactures or merchandise imported in the same from the United States; or from any foreign country; or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise exported in the same to the United States or to any foreign country; or transported in the same from one open port of China to another, than are imposed or levied on vessels or cargoes of any other nation or on those of Chinese subjects.

The United States hereby promise and agree that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues or duties for imports shall be imposed or levied in the ports of the United States upon vessels wholly belonging to the subjects of His Imperial Majesty and coming either directly or by way of any foreign trade, to the ports of the United States; or returning therefrom either directly or by way of any foreign port, to any of the open ports of China; or upon the produce, manufactures or merchandise imported in the same from China or from any foreign country, than are imposed or levied on vessels of other nations which make no discrimination against the United States in tonnage dues or duties on imports, exports, or coastwise trade; or than are imposed or levied on vessels and cargoes of citizens of the United States.

ARTICLE IV.

When controversies arise in the Chinese Empire between citizens of the United States and subjects of His Imperial Majesty, which need to be examined and decided by the public officers of the two nations, it is agreed between the Governments of the United States and China that such cases shall be tried by the proper official of the nationality of the defendant. The properly authorized official of the plaintiff's nationality shall be freely permitted to attend the trials and shall be treated with the courtesy due to his position. He shall be granted all proper facilities for watching the proceedings in the interests of justice. If he so desires, he shall have the right to present, to examine, and he shall be permitted to protest against them in detail. The law administered will be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case.

In faith whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed the foregoing at Peking in English and Chinese, being three originals of each text, of even tenor and date, the ratification of which shall be exchanged at Peking within one year form the date of its execution.

Done at Peking this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord, 1880, Kuanghsii, sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day.

JAMES B. ANGELL. [SEAL.]
JOHN F. SWIFT. [SEAL.]
WM. HENRY TRESCOT.[SEAL.]
PAO CHUN. [SEAL.]
LI HUNGTSAO. [SEAL.]

And whereas the said Treaty has been duly ratified on both parts and the respective ratification were exchanged at Peking on the 19th day of July 1881:

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Chester A. Arthur, President of the United States of America, have caused the said Treaty to be made public to the end that the same and every article and clause thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done in Washington this fifth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-one, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and sixth.

[SEAL.] CHESTER A. ARTHUR, By the President:
JAMES G. BLAINE, Secretary of State.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).