Ramsay, Alexander (d.1402) (DNB00)

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Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 47
Ramsay, Alexander (d.1402)

by Thomas Finlayson Henderson
Contains subarticle Sir Alexander Ramsay (fl. 1450).

RAMSAY, Sir ALEXANDER (d. 1402), of Dalhousie, was the son of Alexander Ramsay of Carnock, eldest son of Sir Patrick Ramsay of Dalhousie. He succeeded his grandfather in 1377, and is described as ‘Dominus de Dalwolsey, miles,’ in a charter of Robert II to Margaret, countess of Mar, on 2 Jan. 1378. In 1400 his house of Dalwolsie was attacked by Henry IV of England, but, according to Wyntoun, Henry ‘tynt fere mare thare than he wan’ (Chronicle, ed. Laing, iii. 77). Ramsay was killed at the battle of Homildon Hill on 14 Sept. 1402. He made a donation to the abbacy of Newbattle, Midlothian, for the welfare of his soul and that of Catherine, his wife (Registrum de Neubotle, Bannatyne Club, p. 234). He was succeeded by Robert de Ramsay, who was probably his son.

Sir Alexander Ramsay (fl. 1450), probably his grandson and son of Robert de Ramsay, obtained a safe-conduct on 3 Feb. 1423–4 until 30 April 1424 as a hostage of James I at Durham (Cal. Documents relating to Scotl. vol. iv. No. 942). At the coronation of James I in 1424 he was made a knight. Along with the Earl of Angus and Hepburn of Hailes he, on 30 Sept. 1435, completely routed the English commander Sir Robert Ogle at Piperden. On 14 Aug. 1451 he was named one of the conservators of a truce with England (ib. No. 1239). He died before 19 March 1464–5 (Reg. Mag. Sig. Scot. 1424–1513, No. 829). He had four sons: Alexander, who predeceased him, leaving a son Alexander, to whom the baronies of Foulden and Dalhousie were confirmed by James III on 22 March 1473, and who was slain at Flodden in September 1513; Robert, ancestor of the Ramsays of Cockpen; George of Hallhouse and Legbernarde, Midlothian; and William. By charter dated 3 April 1456 he executed an entail of his estate in favour of Alexander, his grandson, and heirs male of his body; which failing, to his second son Robert, his third son George, his fourth son William, and heirs male of their body.

[Chronicles of Wyntoun and Fordun; Cal. Documents relating to Scotland, vol. iv.; Reg. Mag. Sig. Scot. 1424–1513; Douglas's Scottish Peerage (Wood), i. 403–4.]

T. F. H.