Recognizing the Contributions of the Christmas Tree Industry to the United States Economy

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Recognizing the Contributions of the Christmas Tree Industry to the United States Economy  (2007) 
by David Wu
Recognizing the Contributions of the Christmas Tree Industry to the United States Economy. Congressional Record: December 19, 2007 (Extensions of Remarks) Page E2657-E2658. DOCID:cr19de07-186.
RECOGNIZING THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE CHRISTMAS TREE INDUSTRY TO THE UNITED STATES ECONOMY
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SPEECH OF
HON. DAVID WU
OF OREGON
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Monday, December 17, 2007

Mr. WU. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.J. Res. 15—Recognizing the contributions of the Christmas tree industry to the United States economy. I am proud to be a cosponsor of this resolution.

During the holiday season, it is appropriate that we consider this resolution. Many Americans participate in the tradition of Christmas and Christmas trees are an important part of this tradition. Many memories associated with Christmas include a beautiful natural tree decorated with lights and ornaments with gifts underneath, shared with family and friends.

Whether families purchase a pre-cut tree or cut the trees themselves—the tree most likely came from a tree farm. More than 36 million Christmas trees are produced each year, and 98 percent of them come from Christmas trees farms. Christmas tree farms have a positive contribution to our economy.

None know the importance of Christmas trees to our economy better than Oregonians. In 2006, Christmas trees accounted for more than $121 million of the Oregon economy. Our number one agricultural commodity is nursery products, including Christmas trees. While many people know Oregon for our forests, it is fitting that we are also first in the Nation in Christmas tree production. I am proud to represent thousands of Oregonians who are part of the Christmas tree and nursery industry.

Christmas trees are both part of the Christmas and winter holiday season, and important to Oregon and the nation's economy. I commend my colleague, Ms. Foxx, for introducing this resolution.

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This work is in the public domain in the United States because it is a work of the United States federal government (see 17 U.S.C. 105).