Robert E. Howard to Weird Tales, Jun 1936

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Letter to Weird Tales Magazine  (1936) 
by Robert Ervin Howard
Letter to "The Eyrie", the letters page of Weird Tales. Dated June 1936.[1]

Enthusiasm impels me to pause from burning spines off cactus for my drouth-bedeviled goats long enough to give three slightly dust-choked cheers for the April cover illustration. The color combination is vivid and attractive, the lady is luscious, and altogether I think it's the best thing Mrs. Brundage[2] has done since she illustrated my Black Colossus. And that's no depreciation of the covers done between these master-pictures. I must also express my appreciation to Mr. Napoli, who has done a splendid job of illustrating my serial.[3] I hope the readers have liked the yarn as well as I liked writing it.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was legally published within the United States (or the United Nations Headquarters in New York subject to Section 7 of the United States Headquarters Agreement) before 1964, and copyright was not renewed.
For Class A renewals records (books only) published between 1923 and 1963, check the Stanford Copyright Renewal Database and the Rutgers copyright renewal records.
For other renewal records of publications between 1922 - 1950 see the Pennsylvania copyright records scans.
For all records since 1978, search the U.S. Copyright Office records.

The author died in 1936, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 75 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.


Works published in 1936 would have had to renew their copyright in either 1963 or 1964, i.e. at least 27 years after it was first published / registered but not later than 31 December(31 December) in the 28th year. As it was not renewed, it entered the public domain on 1 January 1965(1 January 1965).

 


Notes[edit]

  1. Howard committed suicide by gunshot on June 11, 1936
  2. Margaret Brundage (bio/media)
  3. The serial referenced here is "The Hour of the Dragon" which had its fifth and final installment in the April 1936 issue.