Sinhala Only Act

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Official Language Act No. 33 of 1956  (1956) 
Parliament of Ceylon
The Sinhala Only Act, officially known as the Official Language Act No. 33 of 1956, the Act made Sinhala the sole official language of Ceylon (Sri Lanka).

Section 1 Short title[edit]

1. This Act may be cited as the Official Language Act, No. 33 of 1956.

Section 2 Sinhala language to be the one official language[edit]

2. The Sinhala language shall be the one official language of Ceylon: Provided that where the Minister considers it impracticable to commence the use of only the Sinhala language for any official purpose immediately on the coming into force of this Act, the language or languages hitherto used for that purpose may be continued to be so used unit 1 the necessary change is effected as early as possible before the expiry of the 31st day of December, 1960, and, if such change cannot be effected by administrative order, regulations may be made under this Act to effect such change.

Section 3 Regulations[edit]

3.

(1) The Minister may make regulations in respect of all matters for which regulations are authorized by this Act to be made and generally for the purpose of giving effect to the principles and provisions of this Act.
(2) No regulation made under subsection (1) shall have effect until it is approved by the Senate and the House of Representatives and notification of such approval is published in the Gazette.

External links[edit]

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