Southern Life in Southern Literature/St. George Tucker

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Southern Life in Southern Literature
Maurice Garland Fulton (Ed.)
St. George Tucker: Resignation
PART I. THE OLD SOUTH IN LITERATURE - POETS

POETS


ST. GEORGE TUCKER

[St. George Tucker was born in Bermuda in 1752. He came early to Virginia and was educated at William and Mary College, after which he was called to the bar. Tucker served in the Virginia legislature, but won his chief distinction as professor of law in William and Mary College. In addition to composing fugitive poems, of which the one here given is the best known, he wrote several political and legal works of note. He died in 1828.]


RESIGNATION

Days of my youth,
 Ye have glided away;
Hairs of my youth,
 Ye are frosted and gray;
Eyes of my youth,
 Your keen sight is no more;
Cheeks of my youth,
 Ye are furrowed all o'er;
Strength of my youth,
 All your vigor is gone;
Thoughts of my youth,
 Your gay visions are flown.

Days of my youth,
 I wish not your recall;
Hairs of my youth,
 I'm content ye should fall;

Eyes of my youth,
 You much evil have seen;
Cheeks of my youth,
 Bathed in tears have you been;
Thoughts of my youth,
 You have led me astray;
Strength of my youth,
 Why lament your decay?

Days of my age,
 Ye will shortly be past;
Pains of my age,
 Yet awhile ye can last;
Joys of my age,
 In true wisdom delight;
Eyes of my age,
 Be religion your light;
Thoughts of my age,
 Dread ye not the cold sod;
Hopes of my age,
 Be ye fixed on your God.