Syria, the Land of Lebanon

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Syria, the Land of Lebanon  (1914) 
by Lewis Gaston Leary

SYRIA
THE LAND
OF
LEBANON

SL 1914 D008 evening in the harbour of beirut.jpg

Evening in the harbor of Beirut

SYRIA

THE LAND OF

LEBANON


BY

LEWIS GASTON LEARY, Ph.D.

FORMERLY INSTRUCTOR IN THE AMERICAN
COLLEGE, BEIRUT, SYRIA

Author of The Real Palestine of To-day,
Andorra, the Hidden Republic, etc.


NEW YORK

McBRIDE, NAST & COMPANY

1913


Copyright, 1913, by
McBride, Nast & Co.



Second Printing
January, 1914




Published, November, 1913

AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED
TO HIM WHO FIRST TURNED MY THOUGHTS
TOWARD SYRIA
MY FORMER PRECEPTOR AND ALWAYS
LOYAL FRIEND
GEORGE L. ROBINSON

PREFACE


Although Syria possesses a rare natural beauty and boasts a wealth of historic and religious interest, its fame has been so overshadowed by that of the neighboring Land of Israel that most travelers are content to take the easy railway journey to Baalbek and Damascus, and know nothing of the wild mountain valleys and snow-capped summits of Lebanon or the many ancient shrines of a country whose history reaches far back of the classic days of Greece.

It is therefore with great pleasure that I accede to the request of the publishers of my "Real Palestine of To-day" and supplement the earlier work by the present companion-volume on Syria; so that, though the books may be read independently, the two together may give a complete view of the lands of the Bible.

The chapter on Palmyra is from the pen of Professor Harvey Porter, Ph.D., of the Syrian Protestant College; and for many of the hitherto unpublished photographs I am indebted to other members of the faculty of that institution. Grateful acknowledgment is also made to The World To-day, The New Era, The Sunday School Times, The Newark (N. J.) News, and especially to Travel and Scribner's Magazine, for permission to include material which originally appeared in these publications.

In the writing of Arabic words, my aim has been smooth reading, rather than a systematic transliteration of the numerous sounds which are not found in English. As an aid to pronunciation, it should be noted that the stress always falls upon a syllable bearing a circumflex accent.

It will be seen that this book is written from a more intimate and personal viewpoint than the volume on Palestine. I could not write otherwise of the country which was for years my own home and where to-day I have many cherished friends among both Syrians and Franks. In fact, I must write very slowly; for every now and then I lay down my pen and, with a homesick lump in my throat, dream over again the happy days in that land of wondrous beauty which I still love with all my heart.

Lewis Gaston Leary

Pelham Manor, N. Y.,

October 15, 1913.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER
PAGE
1
6
26
44
60
72
88
95
110
128
144
163
184
201
INDEX

THE ILLUSTRATIONS

Evening in the harbor of Beirut
Frontispiece
FACING
PAGE
Along the coast north of Beirut
4
Looking up the western slopes of Lebanon
5
Lebanon soldiers
16
Village of Deir el-Kamr
17
Bay of Beirut and Mount Sunnin
26
Pine groves of Beirut
27
Bridge over the Dog River
36
Procession in Beirut
37
Students of the American College
48
Cape of Beirut viewed from Lebanon
49
Old Bridge over the Barada River
70
Cascade in the Yarmuk Valley
71
A caravan
82
Damascus — a distant view
83
Damascus — one of the more modern avenues
100
A Syrian café
101
Damascus — court of a private residence
112
Damascus — Moslem cemetery
113
Damascus — The Street called Straight
120
Damascus — The Omayyade Mosque
121
Palmyra — General view of the ruins
134
Palmyra — the Triple Gate
135
Funeral procession of the patriarch
160
A summer camp in Lebanon
161
The Cedar Mountain
170
Source of the Kadisha River
171
The oldest Cedar of Lebanon
182
Baalbek — the six great columns
183
Baalbek — the stone in the quarry
198
Hama — the Orontes River
199
Maps and Plans
The railway from Beirut to Damascus
62
Cross-section of Syria
64
The Hauran
74
The temples of Baalbek
194