Template:EB1911 Fine Print

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Purpose[edit]

This template is used to format the fine-print sections of articles from 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. It differs from the {{font-size-x}} template in that it also proportionally reduces the line height a bit.

Usage[edit]

For example, many articles have bibliographies at the end which are printed with a smaller-sized font. These sections would be handled as follows:

... Gellert wrote a few comedies: ''Die''
''Betschwester'' (1745), ''Die kranke Frau'' (1748), ''Das Los in der''
''Lotterie'' (1748), and ''Die zärtlichen Schwestern'' (1748), the last of
which was much admired. His novel ''Die schwedische Gräfin''
''von G.'' (1746), a weak imitation of Richardson's ''Pamela'', is
remarkable as being the first German attempt at a psychological
novel. Gellert's ''Briefe'' (letters) were regarded at the time as
models of good style.

{{EB1911 Fine Print|See Gellert's ''Sämtliche Schriften'' (first edition, 10 vols., Leipzig,
1769-1774; last edition, Berlin, 1867). ''Sämtliche Fabeln und Erzählungen''
have been often published separately, the latest edition in
1896. A selection of Gellert's poetry (with an excellent introduction)
will be found in F. Muncker, ''Die Bremer Beiträge'' (Stuttgart, 1899).
A translation by J. A. Murke, ''Gellert's Fables and other Poems''
(London, 1851). For a further account of Gellert's life and work
see lives by J. A. Cramer (Leipzig, 1774), H. Döring (Greiz, 1833),
and H. O. Nietschmann (2nd ed., Halle, 1901); also ''Gellerts''
''Tagebuch aus dem Jahre 1761'' (2nd ed., Leipzig, 1863) and ''Gellerts''
''Briefwechsel mit Demoiselle Lucius'' (Leipzig, 1823).}}

Which yields:

... Gellert wrote a few comedies: Die Betschwester (1745), Die kranke Frau (1748), Das Los in der Lotterie (1748), and Die zärtlichen Schwestern (1748), the last of which was much admired. His novel Die schwedische Gräfin von G. (1746), a weak imitation of Richardson's Pamela, is remarkable as being the first German attempt at a psychological novel. Gellert's Briefe (letters) were regarded at the time as models of good style.

See Gellert's Sämtliche Schriften (first edition, 10 vols., Leipzig, 1769-1774; last edition, Berlin, 1867). Sämtliche Fabeln und Erzählungen have been often published separately, the latest edition in 1896. A selection of Gellert's poetry (with an excellent introduction) will be found in F. Muncker, Die Bremer Beiträge (Stuttgart, 1899). A translation by J. A. Murke, Gellert's Fables and other Poems (London, 1851). For a further account of Gellert's life and work see lives by J. A. Cramer (Leipzig, 1774), H. Döring (Greiz, 1833), and H. O. Nietschmann (2nd ed., Halle, 1901); also Gellerts Tagebuch aus dem Jahre 1761 (2nd ed., Leipzig, 1863) and Gellerts Briefwechsel mit Demoiselle Lucius (Leipzig, 1823).

Usage tips[edit]

If the text contains an equal sign, each occurrence of = must be replaced by {{=}}. The template does not work reliably across paragraphs, so the easiest procedure is to apply it paragraph by paragraph when multiple adjacent paragraphs appear in fine print. However, if adjacent fine-print paragraphs contain no links or templates, often one instance of this template can enclose them all.

Start and end versions[edit]

Where formatting continues through the termination of a page, the {{EB1911 Fine Print/s}} and {{EB1911 Fine Print/e}} should be used.