The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  (1884) 
by Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) is commonly accounted as one of the first Great American Novels. It was also one of the first major American novels ever written in the vernacular, or common speech, being told in the first person by the eponymous Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, best friend of Tom Sawyer (hero of three other Mark Twain books). The book was first published in 1884.Excerpted from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Notice[edit]

PERSONS attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.

BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR, Per G.G., Chief of Ordnance.

Explanatory[edit]

In this book a number of dialects are used, to wit: the Missouri negro dialect; the extremest form of the backwoods Southwestern dialect; the ordinary "Pike County" dialect; and four modified varieties of this last. The shadings have not been done in a haphazard fashion, or by guesswork; but painstakingly, and with the trustworthy guidance and support of personal familiarity with these several forms of speech.

I make this explanation for the reason that without it many readers would suppose that all these characters were trying to talk alike and not succeeding.

THE AUTHOR

Huckleberry Finn[edit]

Scene: The Mississippi Valley Time: Forty to fifty years ago


This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.