The Annotated 'Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes'/Father Apollinaris

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Father Apollinaris

Next morning (Thursday, 26th September) I took the road in a new order. The sack was no longer doubled, but hung at full length across the saddle, a green sausage six feet long with a tuft of blue wool hanging out of either end. It was more picturesque, it spared the donkey, and, as I began to see, it would ensure stability, blow high, blow low. But it was not without a pang that I had so decided. For although I had purchased a new cord, and made all as fast as I was able, I was yet jealously uneasy lest the flaps should tumble out and scatter my effects along the line of march.

My way lay up the bald valley of the river, along the march of Vivarais and Gévaudan. The hills of Gévaudan on the right were a little more naked, if anything, than those of Vivarais upon the left, and the former had a monopoly of a low dotty underwood that grew thickly in the gorges and died out in solitary burrs upon the shoulders and the summits. Black bricks of fir-wood were plastered here and there upon both sides, and here and there were cultivated fields. A railway ran beside the river; the only bit of railway in Gévaudan, although there are many proposals afoot and surveys being made, and even, as they tell me, a station standing ready built in Mendemap. A year or two hence and this may be another world. The desert is beleaguered. Now may some Languedocian Wordsworth[1] turn the sonnet into patois: ‘Mountains and vales and floods, heard YE that whistle?’[2]

At a place called La Bastidemap I was directed to leave the river, and follow a road that mounted on the left among the hills of Vivarais, the modern Ardèche; for I was now come within a little way of my strange destination, the Trappist monastery of Our Lady of the Snows.[3] The sun came out as I left the shelter of a pine-wood, and I beheld suddenly a fine wild landscape to the south. High rocky hills, as blue as sapphire, closed the view, and between these lay ridge upon ridge, heathery, craggy, the sun glittering on veins of rock, the underwood clambering in the hollows, as rude as God made them at the first. There was not a sign of man’s hand in all the prospect; and indeed not a trace of his passage, save where generation after generation had walked in twisted footpaths, in and out among the beeches, and up and down upon the channelled slopes. The mists, which had hitherto beset me, were now broken into clouds, and fled swiftly and shone brightly in the sun. I drew a long breath. It was grateful to come, after so long, upon a scene of some attraction for the human heart. I own I like definite form in what my eyes are to rest upon; and if landscapes were sold, like the sheets of characters of my boyhood, one penny plain and twopence coloured, I should go the length of twopence every day of my life.[4]

But if things had grown better to the south, it was still desolate and inclement near at hand. A spidery cross on every hill-top marked the neighbourhood of a religious house; and a quarter of a mile beyond, the outlook southward opening out and growing bolder with every step, a white statue of the Virgin at the corner of a young plantation directed the traveller to Our Lady of the Snows. Here, then, I struck leftward, and pursued my way, driving my secular donkey before me, and creaking in my secular boots and gaiters, towards the asylum of silence.

I had not gone very far ere the wind brought to me the clanging of a bell, and somehow, I can scarce tell why, my heart sank within me at the sound. I have rarely approached anything with more unaffected terror than the monastery of Our Lady of the Snows. This it is to have had a Protestant education. And suddenly, on turning a corner, fear took hold on me from head to foot—slavish, superstitious fear; and though I did not stop in my advance, yet I went on slowly, like a man who should have passed a bourne unnoticed, and strayed into the country of the dead. For there, upon the narrow new-made road, between the stripling pines, was a mediaeval friar, fighting with a barrowful of turfs. Every Sunday of my childhood I used to study the Hermits of Marco Sadeler[5]—enchanting prints, full of wood and field and mediaeval landscapes, as large as a county, for the imagination to go a-travelling in; and here, sure enough, was one of Marco Sadeler’s heroes. He was robed in white like any spectre,[6] and the hood falling back, in the instancy of his contention with the barrow, disclosed a pate[7] as bald and yellow as a skull. He might have been buried any time these thousand years, and all the lively parts of him resolved into earth and broken up with the farmer’s harrow.

I was troubled besides in my mind as to etiquette. Durst I address a person who was under a vow of silence?[8] Clearly not. But drawing near, I doffed my cap to him with a far-away superstitious reverence. He nodded back, and cheerfully addressed me. Was I going to the monastery? Who was I? An Englishman? Ah, an Irishman, then?

‘No,’ I said, ‘a Scotsman.’

A Scotsman? Ah, he had never seen a Scotsman before. And he looked me all over, his good, honest, brawny countenance shining with interest, as a boy might look upon a lion or an alligator. From him I learned with disgust that I could not be received at Our Lady of the Snows; I might get a meal, perhaps, but that was all. And then, as our talk ran on, and it turned out that I was not a pedlar, but a literary man, who drew landscapes and was going to write a book, he changed his manner of thinking as to my reception (for I fear they respect persons even in a Trappist monastery), and told me I must be sure to ask for the Father Prior, and state my case to him in full. On second thoughts he determined to go down with me himself; he thought he could manage for me better. Might he say that I was a geographer?

No; I thought, in the interests of truth, he positively might not.

‘Very well, then’ (with disappointment), ‘an author.’

It appeared he had been in a seminary with six young Irishmen, all priests long since, who had received newspapers and kept him informed of the state of ecclesiastical affairs in England. And he asked me eagerly after Dr. Pusey,[9] for whose conversion the good man had continued ever since to pray night and morning.

‘I thought he was very near the truth,’ he said; ‘and he will reach it yet; there is so much virtue in prayer.’

He must be a stiff, ungodly Protestant who can take anything but pleasure in this kind and hopeful story. While he was thus near the subject, the good father asked me if I were a Christian; and when he found I was not, or not after his way, he glossed it over with great good-will.

The road which we were following, and which this stalwart father had made with his own two hands within the space of a year, came to a corner, and showed us some white buildings a little farther on beyond the wood. At the same time, the bell once more sounded abroad. We were hard upon the monastery. Father Apollinaris[10] (for that was my companion’s name) stopped me.

‘I must not speak to you down there,’ he said. ‘Ask for the Brother Porter, and all will be well. But try to see me as you go out again through the wood, where I may speak to you. I am charmed to have made your acquaintance.’

And then suddenly raising his arms, flapping his fingers, and crying out twice, ‘I must not speak, I must not speak!’ he ran away in front of me, and disappeared into the monastery door.

I own this somewhat ghastly eccentricity went a good way to revive my terrors. But where one was so good and simple, why should not all be alike? I took heart of grace, and went forward to the gate as fast as Modestine, who seemed to have a disaffection for monasteries, would permit. It was the first door, in my acquaintance of her, which she had not shown an indecent haste to enter. I summoned the place in form,[11] though with a quaking heart. Father Michael,[12] the Father Hospitaller,[13] and a pair of brown-robed brothers came to the gate and spoke with me a while. I think my sack was the great attraction; it had already beguiled the heart of poor Apollinaris, who had charged me on my life to show it to the Father Prior. But whether it was my address, or the sack, or the idea speedily published among that part of the brotherhood who attend on strangers that I was not a pedlar after all, I found no difficulty as to my reception. Modestine was led away by a layman to the stables, and I and my pack were received into Our Lady of the Snows.

Notes[edit]

  1. Languedocian Wordsworth .. from Languedoc, formerly an independent kingdom and now southern France, home of the most famous poets of medieval France.
  2. Wordsworth .. William Wordsworth's 1844 poem Proud where ye, mountains, when, in times of old is a protest against the building of a railroad in England:
    PROUD were ye, Mountains, when, in times of old,
    Your patriot sons, to stem invasive war,
    Intrenched your brows; ye gloried in each scar:
    Now, for your shame, a Power, the Thirst of Gold,
    That rules o'er Britain like a baneful star,
    Wills that your peace, your beauty, shall be sold,
    And clear way made for her triumphal car
    Through the beloved retreats your arms enfold!
    Heard YE that Whistle? As her long-linked Train
    Swept onwards, did the vision cross your view?
    Yes, ye were startled;--and, in balance true,
    Weighing the mischief with the promised gain,
    Mountains, and Vales, and Floods, I call on you
    To share the passion of a just disdain.
  3. Our Lady of the Snows .. Our Lady of the Snows monastery (founded 1850) named for its location in the snow covered mountains. See also Stevenson's poem Our Lady of the Snows published in Underwoods (1887).
  4. sheets.. of my boyhood .. in reference to the pictures Stevenson, as a boy, used to represent characters in his toy theater. See his essay "A Penny Plain and Twopence Coloured" in Memories and Portraits.
  5. Hermits of Marco Sadeler .. Marcus Christopher Sadeler (1614-1660) was a Dutch engraver, son of celebrated Aegidius Sadeler, of whom Stevenson possessed a book of engravings showing hermits, probably the Lives of the Hermits.
  6. robed in white .. the Order of Cistercians wear white robes.
  7. pate .. crown of the head.
  8. vow of silence .. Cistercian refrain from the spoken word is often mistakenly thought to be a vow of silence.
  9. Dr. Pusey .. Edward Bouverie Pusey (1800-1882), a leader of the Oxford Movement which sought to counteract growing liberalism in the Church of England by restoring medieval creeds and rights. Eventually some of the members of this movement took it to its logical conclusion and reverted back to Roman Catholicism, although Pusey never did.
  10. Father Apollinaris .. Apollinaire Rey (b.1825). He entered the monastery in 1851 (before the building was complete) and was ordained in 1892.
  11. summoned the place .. antiquated war language, usually used when attacking a fortification or asking for its surrender. Stevenson styles himself a knight-errant besieging the monastery.
  12. Father Michael .. Michael Eymard (1847-1890), entered the monastery in 1866 and was ordained in 1872. He was later sent to Mexico where he died March 16, 1890.
  13. Father Hospitaller .. one whose office is to receive and entertain guests.

The Annotated 'Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes'