The City of God/Book III

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The City of God
Augustine of Hippo
translated by Marcus Dods

Book III
Argument—As in the foregoing book Augustin has proved regarding moral and spiritual calamities, so in this book he proves regarding external and bodily disasters, that since the foundation of the city the Romans have been continually subject to them; and that even when the false gods were worshipped without a rival, before the advent of Christ, they afforded no relief from such calamities.

Book III[edit]

  1. Of the Ills Which Alone the Wicked Fear, and Which the World Continually Suffered, Even When the Gods Were Worshipped.
  2. Whether the Gods, Whom the Greeks and Romans Worshipped in Common, Were Justified in Permitting the Destruction of Ilium.
  3. That the Gods Could Not Be Offended by the Adultery of Paris, This Crime Being So Common Among Themselves.
  4. Of Varro’s Opinion, that It is Useful for Men to Feign Themselves the Offspring of the Gods.
  5. That It is Not Credible that the Gods Should Have Punished the Adultery of Paris, Seeing They Showed No Indignation at the Adultery of the Mother of Romulus.
  6. That the Gods Exacted No Penalty for the Fratricidal Act of Romulus.
  7. Of the Destruction of Ilium by Fimbria, a Lieutenant of Marius.
  8. Whether Rome Ought to Have Been Entrusted to the Trojan Gods.
  9. Whether It is Credible that the Peace During the Reign of Numa Was Brought About by the Gods.
  10. Whether It Was Desirable that The Roman Empire Should Be Increased by Such a Furious Succession of Wars, When It Might Have Been Quiet and Safe by Following in the Peaceful Ways of Numa.
  11. Of the Statue of Apollo at Cumæ, Whose Tears are Supposed to Have Portended Disaster to the Greeks, Whom the God Was Unable to Succor.
  12. That the Romans Added a Vast Number of Gods to Those Introduced by Numa, and that Their Numbers Helped Them Not at All.
  13. By What Right or Agreement The Romans Obtained Their First Wives.
  14. Of the Wickedness of the War Waged by the Romans Against the Albans, and of the Victories Won by the Lust of Power.
  15. What Manner of Life and Death the Roman Kings Had.
  16. Of the First Roman Consuls, the One of Whom Drove the Other from the Country, and Shortly After Perished at Rome by the Hand of a Wounded Enemy, and So Ended a Career of Unnatural Murders.
  17. Of the Disasters Which Vexed the Roman Republic After the Inauguration of the Consulship, and of the Non-Intervention of the Gods of Rome.
  18. The Disasters Suffered by the Romans in the Punic Wars, Which Were Not Mitigated by the Protection of the Gods.
  19. Of the Calamity of the Second Punic War, Which Consumed the Strength of Both Parties.
  20. Of the Destruction of the Saguntines, Who Received No Help from the Roman Gods, Though Perishing on Account of Their Fidelity to Rome.
  21. Of the Ingratitude of Rome to Scipio, Its Deliverer, and of Its Manners During the Period Which Sallust Describes as the Best.
  22. Of the Edict of Mithridates, Commanding that All Roman Citizens Found in Asia Should Be Slain.
  23. Of the Internal Disasters Which Vexed the Roman Republic, and Followed a Portentous Madness Which Seized All the Domestic Animals.
  24. Of the Civil Dissension Occasioned by the Sedition of the Gracchi.
  25. Of the Temple of Concord, Which Was Erected by a Decree of the Senate on the Scene of These Seditions and Massacres.
  26. Of the Various Kinds of Wars Which Followed the Building of the Temple of Concord.
  27. Of the Civil War Between Marius and Sylla.
  28. Of the Victory of Sylla, the Avenger of the Cruelties of Marius.
  29. A Comparison of the Disasters Which Rome Experienced During the Gothic and Gallic Invasions, with Those Occasioned by the Authors of the Civil Wars.
  30. Of the Connection of the Wars Which with Great Severity and Frequency Followed One Another Before the Advent of Christ.
  31. That It is Effrontery to Impute the Present Troubles to Christ and the Prohibition of Polytheistic Worship Since Even When the Gods Were Worshipped Such Calamities Befell the People.