The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia

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The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia  (1759) 
Samuel Johnson
The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia, often abbreviated to Rasselas, is a 1759 novella by Samuel Johnson. In it, Rasselas leaves his home in company with his sister, Nekayah, and a philosopher, Imlac, to seek adventure. His observation of other kinds of people eventually leads to the conclusion that there is no easy path to happiness.
  1. I: Description of a Palace in a Valley
  2. II: The Discontent of Rasselas in the Happy Valley
  3. III: The Wants of Him that Wants Nothing
  4. IV: The Prince Continues to Grieve and Muse
  5. V: The Prince Meditates His Escape
  6. VI: A Dissertation on the Art of Flying
  7. VII: The Prince Finds a Man of Learning
  8. VIII: The History of Imlac
  9. IX: The History of Imlac (continued)
  10. X: Imlac's History (continued)—A Dissertation upon Poetry
  11. XI: Imlac's Narrative (continued)—A Hint of Pilgrimage
  12. XII: The Story of Imlac (continued)
  13. XIII: Rasselas Discovers the Means of Escape
  14. XIV: Rasselas and Imlac Receive an Unexpected Visit
  15. XV: The Prince and Princess Leave the Valley, and See Many Wonders
  16. XVI: They Enter Cairo, and Find Every Man Happy
  17. XVII: The Prince Associates with Young Men of Spirit and Gaiety
  18. XVIII: The Prince Finds a Wise and Happy Man
  19. XIX: A Glimpse of Pastoral Life
  20. XX: The Danger of Prosperity
  21. XXI: The Happiness of Solitude—The Hermit's History
  22. XXII: The Happiness of a Life Led According to Nature
  23. XXIII: The Prince and His Sister Divide between Them the Work of Observation
  24. XXIV: The Prince Examines the Happiness of High Stations
  25. XXV: The Princess Pursues Her Inquiry with More Diligence than Success
  26. XXVI: The Princess Continues Her Remarks upon Private Life
  27. XXVII: Disquisition upon Greatness
  28. XXVIII: Rasselas and Nekayah Continue Their Observation
  29. XXIX: The Debate on Marriage (continued)
  30. XXX: Imlac Enters, and Changes the Conversation
  31. XXXI: They Visit the Pyramids
  32. XXXII: They Enter the Pyramid
  33. XXXIII: The Princess Meets with an Unexpected Misfortune
  34. XXXIV: They Return to Cairo without Pekuah
  35. XXXV: The Princess Languishes for Want of Pekuah
  36. XXXVI: Pekuah Is Still Remembered. The Progress of Sorrow
  37. XXXVII: The Princess Hears News of Pekuah
  38. XXXVIII: The Adventures of Lady Pekuah
  39. XXXIX: The Adventures of Pekuah (continued)
  40. XL: The History of a Man of Learning
  41. XLI: The Astronomer Discovers the Cause of His Uneasiness
  42. XLII: The Opinion of the Astronomer Is Explained and Justified
  43. XLIII: The Astronomer Leaves Imlac His Directions
  44. XLIV: The Dangerous Prevalence of Imagination
  45. XLV: They Discourse with an Old Man
  46. XLVI: The Princess and Pekuah Visit the Astronomer
  47. XLVII: The Prince Enters, and Brings a New Topic
  48. XLVIII: Imlac Discourses on the Nature of the Soul
  49. XLIX: The Conclusion, in Which Nothing Is Concluded