The History of the University of Pennsylvania

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The History of the University of Pennsylvania  (1834) 
by George B. Wood
 

A gift to the University from his most Christian Majesty (excerpt):

Charles Gravier, Count of Vergennes

Among the incidents in the history of the university, it would be improper to pass over, without notice, an evidence of the kindness with which this country and its institutions were regarded by the government of France. In July, 1784, a letter was received by the board of trustees from the Marquis de Chattaleau, requesting their acceptance of a collection of valuable books as a present from his most Christian Majesty, made at the instance of the Count de Vergennes and himself. It is unnecessary to say that this mark of royal favour was received with due respect, and answered with a profession of their grateful sense of the honour conferred upon them. Even republicans are wont to attach a fictitious value to the favours of monarchs; and, in the present case, the munificence of the gift is still further enhanced by the associations which our memory forms of its royal author with the independence of our country and his own unmerited misfortunes.”

 
 

THE

 

HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY

 

OF

 

PENNSYLVANIA,

 

FROM ITS ORIGIN TO THE YEAR 1827,

 

BY GEORGE B. WOOD, M. D.

 

 

Read before the Council of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, October 29th, 1827.

 

AND

 

PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE COUNCIL.

 

 

Philadelphia:

McCARTY & DAVIS, No. 171, MARKET STREET.


1834.

 
 

Contents

  • Early Education In Philadelphia.—Establishment Of The Academy.—Incorporation Of the College.
  • Organization and Government of the College.—First Graduates.—Prosperity of the College.
  • Provost and Professors of the College.
  • Origin of the Medical Department.
  • Finances of the College.
  • Abrogation of the Charter of the College by the Pennsylvania Legislature.
  • Establishment of the University.
  • Re-establishment of the College.—Separate Existence of the Two Schools.—Union of the College and University.
  • Organization of the University, After the Union of the Schools.
  • Account of the Professors of the University.
  • Removal of the School.—New University Edifice in Ninth Street.
  • Languishing Condition of the Schools in the University.—Defective Arrangements Upon Which This Condition Depended.
  • New Regulations.—Institution of the Philomathean Society.—Improved State of the School.—Establishment of the Department of Natural Science.
  • State of the University in the Year 1827.
This work was published before January 1, 1923, and is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.