The Internationale (Qu)

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The Internationale (Translation of Qu's version)  (1923) 
by Qu Qiubai, translated by Wikisource
Based on the Chinese-English translation from Wikipedia article The Internationale in Chinese.

Arise, slaves afflicted by hunger and cold,
Arise, suffering people all over the world!
The blood which fills my chest has boiled over,
We must struggle for truth!
The old world shall be destroyed like fallen petals and splashed water,
Arise, slaves, arise!
Do not say that we have nothing,
We shall be the masters of the world!
 |: This is the final struggle,
  Unite together towards tomorrow,
  The Internationale
  Shall certainly be realised. :|

There has never been any saviour of the world,
Nor deities, nor emperors on which to depend.
To create Mankind's happiness
We must entirely depend on ourselves!
We shall retake the fruits of our labour,
And let the mind burst free from its prison cell.
Let the flames in the furnace burn red-hot,
For only when the iron is hot will we succeed in forging it!
 |: This is the final struggle,
  Unite together towards tomorrow,
  The Internationale
  Shall definitely be realised. :|

Who is it that created the world of humankind?
It is us, the masses.
Everything is for workers,
How can parasites be accommodated!
[We] hate those poisonous snakes and savage beasts the most,
Eating up our flesh and blood.
Once they are entirely destroyed,
The red sun will shine all over the globe!
 |: This is the final struggle,
  Unite together towards tomorrow,
  The Internationale
  Shall definitely be realised. :|

This is a translation and has a separate copyright status from the original text. The license for the translation applies to this edition only.
Original:
This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was first published outside the United States (and not published in the U.S. within 30 days), and it was first published before 1989 without complying with U.S. copyright formalities (renewal and/or copyright notice) and it was in the public domain in its home country on the URAA date (January 1, 1996 for most countries).

The author died in 1935, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 75 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.

 
Translation:
This work is licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.