The New York Times/From Washington: Abolition of Slavery

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From Washington: Abolition Of Slavery
The New York Times, Feb 1, 1865; front page

Passage of the Constitutional Amendment

ONE HUNDRED AND NINETEEN YEAS AGAINST FIFTY-SIX NAYS

Exciting Scene in the House Enthusiasm Over the Result

THE PEACE MISSION IN THE SENATE A RESOLUTION CALLING FOR INFORMATION

'Passage of Retaliation Resolutions in the Senate

Special Dispatches to the New York Times


Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31.

THE PASSAGE OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

The great feature of the existing rebellion was the passage to-day by the House of Representatives of the resolutions submitting to the Legislatures of the several States an amendment to the Constitution abolishing slavery. It was an epoch in the history of the country, and will be remembered by the members of the House and spectators present as an event in their lives. At 3 o'clock, by general consent, all discussion having ceased, the preliminary votes to reconsider and second the demand for the previous question were agreed to by a vote of 113 yeas, to 58 nays; and amid profound silence the Speaker announced that the yeas and nays would be taken directly upon the pending proposition. During the call, when prominent Democrats voted aye, there was suppressed evidence of applause and gratification exhibited in the galleries, but it was evident that the great interest centered entirely upon the final result, and when the presiding officer announced that the resolution was agreed to by yeas 119, nays 56, the enthusiasm of all present, save a few disappointed politicians, knew no bounds, and for several moments the scene was grand and impressive beyond description. No attempt was made to suppress the applause which came from all sides, every one feeling that the occasion justified the fullest expression of approbation and joy. [MISSING TEXT]

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