The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787/Volume 3/Appendix B

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The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, Volume 3, by Max Farrand
Appendix B. The Delegates to the Federal Convention, Their Credentials, and Attendance.


APPENDIX B


the delegates to the federal convention, their credentials, and attendance.

List of Delegates.[1][edit]

New Hampshire John Langdon
  (John Pickering)
  Nicholas Gilman
  (Benjamin West)[2]
Massachusetts (Francis Dana)
  Elbridge Gerry
  Nathaniel Gorham
  Rufus King
  Caleb Strong
Rhode Island No appointment
Connecticut William Samuel Johnson
  Roger Sherman
  Oliver Ellsworth
  [Erastus Wolcott was elected but declined to serve.]
New York Robert Yates
  Alexander Hamilton
  John Lansing, Junior
New Jersey David Brearley
  William Churchill Houston
  William Paterson
  (John Neilson)
  William Livingston
  (Abraham Clark)
  Jonathan Dayton
Pennsylvania Thomas Mifflin
  Robert Morris

Pennsylvania (continued) George Clymer
  Jared Ingersoll
  Thomas Fitzsimons
  James Wilson
  Gouverneur Morris
  Benjamin Franklin
Delaware George Read
  Gunning Bedford, Junior
  John Dickinson
  Richard Bassett
  Jacob Broom
Maryland James McHenry
  Daniel of St. Thomas Jenifer
  Daniel Carroll
  John Francis Mercer
  Luther Martin
  [Charles Carroll of Carrollton, Gabriel Duvall, Robert Hanson Harrison, Thomas Sim Lee, and Thomas Stone were elected but declined to serve.]
Virginia George Washington
  Edmund Randolph
  John Blair
  James Madison, Junior
  George Mason
  George Wythe
  James McClurg
  [Patrick Henry,[3] Richard Henry Lee, and Thomas Nelson were elected but declined to serve.]

North Carolina Alexander Martin
  William Richardson Davie
  Richard Dobbs Spaight
  William Blount
  Hugh Williamson
  [Richard Caswell and Willie Jones were elected but declined to serve.]
South Carolina John Rutledge
  Charles Pinckney
  Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
  Pierce Butler
  (Henry Laurens)
Georgia William Few
  Abraham Baldwin
  William Pierce
  (George Walton)
  William Houstoun
  (Nathaniel Pendleton)

Credentials[edit]

[Arranged according to the date of legislative action, — Virginia, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Delaware, Georgia, New York, South Carolina, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maryland.]

Virginia[edit]

Virginia

General Assembly begun and held at the Public Buildings in the City of Richmond on Monday the sixteenth day of October in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty six

An Act for appointing Deputies from this Commonwealth to a Convention proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia in May next for the purpose of revising the federal Constitution.

Whereas the Commissioners who assembled at Annapolis on the fourteenth day of September last for the purpose of devising and reporting the means of enabling Congress to provide effectually for the Commercial Interests of the United States have represented the necessity of extending the revision of the fœderal System to all it’s defects and have recommended that Deputies for that purpose be appointed by the several Legislatures to meet in Convention in the City of Philadelphia on the second day of May next a provision which was preferable to a discussion of the subject in Congress where it might be too much interrupted by the ordinary business before them and where it would besides be deprived of the valuable Counsels of sundry Individuals who are disqualified by the Constitution or Laws of particular States or restrained by peculiar circumstances from a Seat in that Assembly: And Whereas the General Assembly of this Commonwealth taking into view the actual situation of the Confederacy as well as reflecting on the alarming representations made from time to time by the United States in Congress particularly in their Act of the fifteenth day of February last can no longer doubt that the Crisis is arrived at which the good People of America are to decide the solemn question whether they will by wise and magnanimous Efforts reap the just fruits of that Independence which they have so gloriously acquired and of that Union which they have cemented with so much of their common Blood, or whether by giving way to unmanly Jealousies and Prejudices or to partial and transitory Interests they will renounce the auspicious blessings prepared for them by the Revolution, and furnish to its Enemies an eventual Triumph over those by whose virtue and valor it has been accomplished: And Whereas the same noble and extended policy and the same fraternal and affectionate Sentiments which originally determined the Citizens of this Commonwealth to unite with their Bretheren of the other States in establishing a Fœderal Government cannot but be Felt with equal force now as motives to lay aside every inferior consideration and to concur in such farther concessions and Provisions as may be necessary to secure the great Objects for which that Government was instituted and to render the United States as happy in peace as they have been glorious in War Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia that seven Commissioners be appointed by joint Ballot of both Houses of Assembly who or any three of them are hereby authorized as Deputies from this Commonwealth to meet such Deputies as may be appointed and authorized by other States to assemble in Convention at Philadelphia as above recommended and to join with them in devising and discussing all such Alterations and farther Provisions as may be necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution adequate to the Exigencies of the Union and in reporting such an Act for that purpose to the United States in Congress as when agreed to by them and duly confirmed by the several States will effectually provide for the same. And be it further enacted that in case of the death of any of the said Deputies or of their declining their appointments the Executive are hereby authorized to supply such Vacancies. And the Governor is requested to transmit forthwith a Copy of this Act to the United States in Congress and to the Executives of each of the States in the Union.

  John Jones Speaker of the Senate
Signed Joseph Prentis, Speaker of the House of Delegates.
A true Copy from the Inrollment

John Beckley Clk House Dels.


In the House of Delegates

Monday the 4th of December 1786.

The House according to the Order of the Day proceeded by joint Ballot with the Senate to the appointment of Seven Deputies from this Commonwealth to a Convention proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia in May next for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution, and the Members having prepared Tickets with the names of the Persons to be appointed, and deposited the same in the Ballot-boxes, Mr. Corbin, Mr. Matthews, Mr. David Stuart, Mr. George Nicholas, Mr. Richard Lee, Mr. Wills, Mr. Thomas Smith, Mr. Goodall and Mr. Turberville were nominated a Committee to meet a Committee from the Senate in the Conference-Chamber and jointly with them to examine the Ballot-boxes and report to the House on whom the Majority of Votes should fall. The Committee then withdrew and after some time returned into the House and reported that the Committee had, according to order, met a Committee from the Senate in the Conference-Chamber, and jointly with them examined the Ballot-boxes and found a majority of Votes in favor of George Washington, Patrick Henry, Edmund Randolph, John Blair, James Madison, George Mason and George Wythe Esquires.

Extract from the Journal,
John Beckley Clk House Dels.
Attest John Beckley
Clk. H. Dels.


In the House of Senators

Monday the 4th of December 1786.

The Senate according to the Order of the Day proceeded by joint ballot with the House of Delegates to the Appointment of Seven Deputies from this Commonwealth to a Convention proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia in May next for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution, and the Members having prepared Tickets with the names of the Persons to be appointed, and deposited the same in the Ballot-boxes, Mr. Anderson, Mr. Nelson and Mr Lee were nominated a Committee to meet a Committee from the House of Delegates in the Conference-Chamber and joinly with them to examine the Ballot-boxes and report to the House on whom the Majority of Votes should fall. The Committee then withdrew and after some time returned into the House and reported that the Committee had, according to order, met a Committee from the House of Delegates in the Conference-Chamber, and jointly with them examined the Ballot-boxes and found a Majority of Votes in favor of George Washington, Patrick Henry, Edmund Randolph, John Blair, James Madison George Mason and George Wythe Esquires.

Extract from the Journal
John Beckley Clk. H. Ds.

Attest,

H. Brook Clk S.


Virginia to wit

(Seal)

I do Certify and make known, to all whom it may Concern, that John Beckley Esquire, is Clerk of the House of Delegates for this Commonwealth, and the proper Officer for attesting the proceedings of the General Assembly of the said Commonwealth, And that full Faith and Credit ought to be given to all things attested by the said John Beckley Esquire, by Virtue of his Office aforesaid.

Given under my hand as Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia and under the Seal thereof, at Richmond this fourth day of May, one thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven.

Edm: Randolph.

Virginia to wit

(Seal)

I do hereby Certify, that Patrick Henry, Esquire, one of the seven Commissioners appointed by joint ballot of both Houses of Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia, authorized as a Deputy therefrom, to meet such Deputies as might be appointed and authorized by other States to assemble in Philadelphia and to join with them in devising and discussing all such Alterations and further provisions, as might be necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of the Union; and in reporting such an Act for that purpose to the United States in Congress, as when agreed to by them and duly confirmed by the several States, might effectually provide for the same, did decline his appointment aforesaid; and thereupon in pursuance of an Act of the General Assembly of the said Commonwealth intituled “An Act for appointing Deputies from this Commonwealth to a Convention proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia in May next, for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution” I do hereby with the advice of the Council of State, supply the said Vacancy by nominating James McClurg, Esquire, a Deputy for the Purposes aforesaid.

Given under my Hand as Governor of the said Commonwealth and under the Seal thereof this second day of May in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and eighty seven.

Edm: Randolph


New Jersey[edit]

The State of New Jersey.

(Seal)

To the Honorable David Brearly, William Churchill Houston, William Patterson and John Neilson Esquires. Greeting.

The Council and Assembly reposing especial trust and confidence in your integrity, prudence and ability, have at a joint meeting appointed you the said David Brearley, William Churchill Houston, William Patterson and John Neilson Esquires, or any three of you, Commissioners to meet such Commissioners, as have been or may be appointed by the other States in the Union, at the City of Philadelphia in the Commonwealth of Pensylvania, on the second Monday in May next for the purpose of taking into Consideration the state of the Union, as to trade and other important objects, and of devising such other Provisions as shall appear to be necessary to render the Constitution of the Federal Government adequate to the exigencies thereof.

In testimony whereof the Great Seal of the State is hereunto affixed. Witness William Livingston Esquire, Governor, Captain General and Commander in Chief in and over the State of New Jersey and Territories thereunto belonging Chancellor and Ordinary in the same, at Trenton the Twenty third day of November in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and Eighty six and of our Sovereignty and Independence the Eleventh.

Wil: Livingston. By His Excellency’s Command

Bowes Reed Secy.
The State of New Jersey. (Seal) To His Excellency William Livingston and the Honorable Abraham Clark Esquires Greeting. The Council and Assembly reposing especial trust and Confidence in your integrity, prudence and ability have at a joint Meeting appointed You the said William Livingston and Abraham Clark Esquires, in conjunction with the Honorable David Brearley, William Churchill Houston & William Patterson Esquires, or any three of you, Commissioners to meet such Commissioners as have been appointed by the other States in the Union at the City of Philadelphia in the Commonwealth of Pensylvania on the second Monday of this present month for the purpose of taking into consideration the state of the Union as to trade and other important Objects, and of devising such other Provisions as shall appear to be necessary to render the Constitution of the federal Government adequate to the exigencies thereof.
In Testimony whereof the Great Seal of the State is hereunto affixed. Witness William Livingston Esquire, Governor, Captain General and Commander in Chief in and over the State of New Jersey and Territories thereunto belonging Chancellor and Ordinary in the same at Burlington the Eighteenth day of May in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven and of our Sovereignty and Independence the Eleventh.

Wil: Livingston

By His Excellency’s Command

Bowes Reed Secy.


The State of New Jersey.

To the Honorable Jonathan Dayton Esquire

The Council and Assembly reposing especial trust and confidence in your integrity, prudence and ability have at a joint Meeting appointed You the said Jonathan Dayton Esquire, in conjunction with His Excellency William Livingston, the Honorable David Brearley, William Churchill Houston, William Patterson and Abraham Clark Esquires, or any three of you, Commissioners to meet such Commissioners as have been appointed by the other States in the Union at the City of Philadelphia in the Commonwealth of Pensylvania, for the purposes of taking into consideration the state of the Union as to trade and other important objects, and of devising such other Provision as shall appear to be necessary to render the Constitution of the federal Government adequate to the exigencies thereof.

In Testimony whereof the Great Seal of the State is hereunto affixed: — Witness Robert Lettis Hooper Esquire, Vice-President, Captain General and Commander in Chief in and over the State of New Jersey and Territories thereunto belonging, Chancellor and Ordinary in the same at Burlington the fifth day of June in the Year of our Lord One thousand

seven hundred and Eighty seven and of our Sovereignty and Independence the Eleventh.

Robt L. Hooper.

By his Honor’s Command

Bowes Reed Secy.

Pennsylvania[edit]

Pensylvania

An Act appointing Deputies to the Convention intended to be held in the City of Philadelphia for the purpose of revising the fœderal Constitution.

Section 1st Whereas the General Assembly of this Commonwealth taking into their serious Consideration the Representations heretofore made to the Legislatures of the several States in the Union by the United States in Congress Assembled, and also weighing the difficulties under which the Confederated States now labour, are fully convinced of the necessity of revising the federal Constitution for the purpose of making such Alterations and amendments as the exigencies of our Public Affairs require. And Whereas the Legislature of the State of Virginia have already passed an Act of that Commonwealth empowering certain Commissioners to meet at the City of Philadelphia in May next, a Convention of Commissioners or Deputies from the different States; And the Legislature of this State are fully sensible of the important advantages which may be derived to the United States, and every of them from co-operating with the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the other States of the Confederation in the said Design.

Section 2nd Be it enacted, and it is hereby enacted by the Representatives of the Freemen of the Commonwealth of Pensylvia in General Assembly met, and by the Authority of the same, That Thomas Mifflin, Robert Morris, George Clymer, Jared Ingersoll, Thomas Fitzsimmons, James Wilson and Governeur Morris Esquires, are hereby appointed Deputies from this State to meet in the Convention of the Deputies of the respective States of North America to be held at the City of Philadelphia on the second day of the Month of May next; And the said Thomas Mifflin, Robert Morris, George Clymer, Jared Ingersoll, Thomas Fitzsimmons, James Wilson and Governeur Morris Esquires, or any four of them, are hereby constituted and appointed Deputies from this State, with Powers to meet such Deputies as may be appointed and authorized by the other States, to assemble in the said Convention at the City aforesaid, and to join with them in devising, deliberating on, and discussing, all such alterations and further Provisions, as may be necessary to render the fœderal Constitution fully adequate to the exigencies of the Union, and in reporting such Act or Acts for that purpose to the United States in Congress Assembled, as when agreed to by them and duly confirmed by the several States, will effectually provide for the same.

Section 3d And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That in case any of the sd Deputies hereby nominated, shall happen to die, or to resign his or their said Appointment or Appointments, the Supreme Executive Council shall be and hereby are empowered and required, to nominate and appoint other Person or Persons in lieu of him or them so deceased, or who has or have so resigned, which Person or Persons, from and after such Nomination and Appointment, shall be and hereby are declared to be vested with the same Powers respectively, as any of the Deputies Nominated and Appointed by this Act, is vested with by the same: Provided Always, that the Council are not hereby authorised, nor shall they make any such Nomination or Appointment, except in Vacation and during the Recess of the General Assembly of this State.

Signed by Order of the House

Thomas Mifflin Speaker

\bigg\{ Seal of the Laws \bigg\}
of Pensylvania

Enacted into a Law at Philadelphia on Saturday December the thirtieth in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty six.

Peter Zachary Lloyd
Clerk of the General Assembly.

I Mathew Irwin Esquire Master of the Rolls for the State of Pensylvania Do Certify the Preceding Writing to be a true Copy (or Exemplification) of a certain Act of Assembly lodged in my Office.

(Seal) In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal of Office the 15 May 1787.

Mathw. Irwine
M. R.

(Seal) A Supplement to the Act entitled “An Act appointing Deputies to the Convention intended to be held in the City of Philadelphia for the purpose of revising the Federal Constitution.

Section 1st Whereas by the Act to which this Act is a Supplement, certain Persons were appointed as Deputies from this State to sit in the said Convention: And Whereas it is the desire of the General Assembly that His Execellency Benjamin Franklin Esquire, President of this State should also sit in the said Convention as a Deputy from this State — therefore

Section 2d Be it enacted and it is hereby enacted by the Representatives of the Freemen of the Commonwealth of Pensylvania, in General Assembly met, and by the Authority of the same, that His Excellency Benjamin Franklin Esquire, be, and he is hereby, appointed and authorised to sit in the said Convention as a Deputy from this State in addition to the Persons heretofore appointed; And that he be, and he hereby is invested with like Powers and authorities as are invested in the said Deputies or any of them.

Signed by Order of the House

Thomas Mifflin Speaker.

Enacted into a Law at Philadelphia on Wednesday the twenty eighth day of March, in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & eighty seven.

Peter Zachary Lloyd
Clerk of the General Assembly.

I Mathew Irwine Esquire, Master of the Rolls for the State of Pensylvania Do Certify the above to be a true Copy (or Exemplification) of a Supplement to a certain Act of Assembly which Supplement is lodged in my Office

(Seal) In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal of Office the 15 May Ao D. 1787.

Mathw Irwine
M. R.


North Carolina[edit]

The State of North Carolina

To the Honorable Alexander Martin Esquire, Greeting.

Whereas our General Assembly, in their late session holden at Fayette-ville, by adjournment, in the Month of January last, did by joint ballot of the Senate and House of Commons, elect Richard Caswell, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davie, Richard Dobbs Spaight, and Willie Jones, Esquires, Deputies to attend a Convention of Delegates from the several United States of America, proposed to be held at the City of Philadelphia in May next for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution.

We do therefore by these Presents, nominate, Commissionate and appoint you the said Alexander Martin, one of the Deputies for and in our behalf to meet with our other Deputies at Philadelphia on the first day of May next and with them or any two of them to confer with such Deputies as may have been or shall be appointed by the other States, for the purpose aforesaid: To hold, exercise and enjoy the appointment aforesaid, with all Powers, Authorities and Emoluments to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining,[4] You conforming, in every instance, to the Act of our said Assembly under which you are appointed.

Witness Richard Caswell Esquire, our Governor, Captain-General and Commander in Chief, under his Hand and our Great Seal at Kinston the 24th day of February in the XI Year of our Independence

Ricd (Seal) Caswell.

Ao Di 1787.

By His Excellency’s Command.
Winston Caswell P. Secy


The State of North-Carolina

To the Honorable William Richardson Davie Esquire Greeting.

Whereas our General Assembly in their late session holden at Fayette-ville, by adjournment, in the Month of January last, did by joint-ballot of the Senate and House of Commons, elect Richard Caswell, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davie, Richard Dobbs Spaight & Willie Jones Esquires, Deputies to attend a Convention of Delegates from the several United States of America proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia in May next for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution.

We do therefore, by these Presents, nominate Commissionate and appoint you the said William Richardson Davie one of the Deputies for and in our behalf to meet with our other Deputies at Philadelphia on the first day of May next and with them or any two of them to confer with such Deputies as may have been or shall be appointed by the other States for the Purposes aforesaid To hold, exercise and enjoy the said appointment with all Powers authorities and emoluments to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining, You conforming, in every instance, to the Act of our said Assembly under which you are appointed.

Witness Richard Caswell Esquire, our Governor, Captain-General and Commander in Chief under his Hand and our Great Seal at Kinston the 24th day of

February in the XI. Year of our Independence, Anno. Dom. 1787:

Rd (Seal.) Caswell

By His Excellency’s Command

Winston Caswell P. Secy.


The State of North Carolina

To the Honorable Richard Dobbs Spaight Esquire, Greeting.

Whereas our General Assembly in their late session holden at Fayette-ville, by adjournment, in the month of January last, did elect you the said Richard Dobbs Spaight with Richard Caswell, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davie, and Willie Jones Esquires, Deputies to attend a Convention of Delegates from the several United States of America proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia in May next, for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution.

We do therefore by these Presents nominate, Commissionate and appoint you the said Richard Dobbs Spaight one of the Deputies for and in behalf of us to meet with our other Deputies at Philadelphia on the first day of May next and with them or any two of them to confer with such Deputies as may have been or shall be appointed by the other States for the purpose aforesaid. To hold, exercise and enjoy the said Appointment with all Powers, Authorities and Emoluments to the same incident and belonging or in any wise appertaining. You conforming in every instance, to the Act of our said Assembly under which you are appointed.

Witness Richard Caswell Esquire, our Governor Captain-General and Commander in Chief under his Hand and our Great Seal at Kinston the 14th day of April in the XIth Year of our Independence Anno. Dom. 1787.

Rd. (Seal) Caswell.

By His Excellency’s Command

Winston Caswell P. Secy


State of North-Carolina

His Excellency Richard Caswell Esquire Governor, Captain General and Commander in Chief in and over the State aforesaid.

To all to whom these Presents shall come

Greeting.

Whereas by an Act of the General Assembly of the said State passed the sixth day of January last, entitled “An Act for appointing Deputies from this State, to a Convention proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia in May next, for the purpose of Revising the Fœderal Constitution” among other things it is Enacted “That five Commissioners be appointed by joint-ballot of both Houses of Assembly who, or any three of them, are hereby authorized as Deputies from this State to meet at Philadelphia on the first day of May next, then and there to meet and confer with such Deputies as may be appointed by the other States for similar purposes, and with them to discuss and decide upon the most effectual means to remove the defects of our Fœderal Union, and to procure the enlarged Purposes which it was intended to effect, and that they report such an Act to the General Assembly of this State as when agreed to by them, will effectually provide for the same.” And it is by the said Act, further Enacted, “That in case of the death or resignation of any of the Deputies or of their declining their Appointments, His Excellency the Governor for the Time being, is hereby authorized to supply such Vacancies.” And Whereas, in consequence of the said Act, Richard Caswell, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davie, Richard Dobbs Spaight and Willie Jones Esquires, were by joint-ballot of the two Houses of Assembly, elected Deputies for the purposes aforesaid: And Whereas the said Richard Caswell hath resigned his said Appointment as one of the Deputies aforesaid.

Now know Ye that I have appointed and by these Presents do appoint the Honorable William Blount Esquire, one of the Deputies to represent this State in the Convention aforesaid, in the room and stead of the aforesaid Richard Caswell, hereby giving and granting to the said William Blount the same Powers, Privileges and Emoluments which the said Richard Caswell would have been vested with or entitled to, had he continued in the Appointment aforesaid.

Given under my Hand and the Great Seal of the State, at Kinston, the 23d day of April Anno Dom 1787. And in the Eleventh Year of American Independence.

Rid. (Seal) Caswell. By His Excellency’s Command

Winston Caswell P. Secy
State of North-Carolina
His Excellency Richard Caswell Esquire, Governor, Captain-General and Commander in Chief, in and over the State aforesaid.
To all to whom these Presents shall come

Greeting.

Whereas by an Act of the General Assembly of the said State, passed the sixth day of January last, entitled “An Act for appointing Deputies from this State, to a Convention proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia in May next for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution” among other things it is enacted “That five Commissioners be appointed by joint-ballot of both Houses of Assembly, who, or any three of whom, are hereby authorized as Deputies from this State, to meet at Philadelphia on the first day of May next, then and there to meet and confer with such Deputies as may be appointed by the other States for similar purposes and with them to discuss and decide upon the most effectual means to remove the defects of our Fœderal Union, and to procure the enlarged purposes, which it was intended to effect, and that they report such an Act to the General Assembly of this State, as when agreed to by them, will effectually provide for the same.” And it is by the said Act, further enacted “That in case of the death or resignation of any of the Deputies, or their declining their Appointments His Excellency the Governor for the Time being is hereby authorized to supply such Vacancies.”

And Whereas in consequence of the said Act Richard Caswell, Alexander Martin, William Richardson Davie, Richard Dobbs Spaight and Willie Jones Esquires, were by joint-ballot of ye two Houses of Assembly elected Deputies for the purposes aforesaid. And Whereas the said Willie Jones hath declined his Appointment as one of the Deputies aforesaid

Now know Ye that I have appointed and by these Presents do appoint the Honorable Hugh Williamson Esquire, one of the Deputies to represent this State in the Convention aforesaid in the room and stead of the aforesaid Willie Jones, hereby giving and granting to the said Hugh Williamson the same Powers, Privileges and emoluments which the said Willie Jones would have been vested with and entitled to had he acted under the Appointment aforesaid.

Given under my Hand and the Great Seal of the State at Kinston the third day of April Anno Dom. 1787. and in the Eleventh Year of American Independence

Rid (Seal) Caswell

By His Excellency’s Command

Dallam Caswell Pro
Secretary

New Hampshire[edit]

State of New \bigg\} In the House of Representatives
Hampshire Jany 17th 1787—

Resolved, that any two of the Delegates of this State to the Congress of the United States, be & hereby are appointed and authorized as Deputies from this State, to meet such Deputies as may be appointed & authorized by other States in the Union, to assemble in Convention at Philadelphia on the second day of May next, and to join with them in devising & discussing all such alterations & further provisions as to render the federal Constitution adequate to the Exigencies of the Union & in reporting such an Act to the United States in Congress, as when agreed to by them, & duly confirmed by the several States, will effectually provide for the same, But in case of the Death of any of said Deputies, or their declining their Appointments, the Executive is hereby authorized to supply such vacancies, and the President is requested to transmit forthwith a copy of this Resolve to the United States in Congress and to the Executive of each of the States in the Union. —

Sent up for Concurrence

John Langdon Speaker

In Senate the same day read & concurred with this Amendment that the said Delegates shall proceed to join the Convention aforesaid, in case Congress shall signify to them, that they approve of the Convention, as advantageous to the Union and not an infringement of the Powers granted to Congress by the Confederation.

Jno Sullivan President

In the House of Representatives the same day read & concurred

John Langdon Speaker

A true Copy

Attest Joseph Pearson Secy


State of New Hampshire[5]

In the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven.

An Act for appointing Deputies from this State to the Convention, proposed to be holden in the City of Philadelphia in May 1787 for the purpose of revising the federal Constitution

Whereas in the formation of the federal Compact, which frames the bond of Union of the American States, it was not possible in the infant state of our Republic to devise a system which in the course of time and experience, would not manifest imperfections that it would be necessary to reform.

And Whereas the limited powers, which by the Articles of Confederation, are vested in the Congress of the United States, have been found far inadequate, to the enlarged purposes which they were intended to produce. And Whereas Congress hath, by repeated and most urgent representations, endeavoured to awaken this, and other States of the Union, to a sense of the truly critical and alarming situation in which they may inevitably be involved, unless timely measures be taken to enlarge the powers of Congress, that they may be thereby enabled to avert the dangers which threaten our existence as a free and independent People. And Whereas this State hath been ever desirous to act upon the liberal system of the general good of the United States, without circumscribing its views, to the narrow and selfish objects of partial convenience; and has been at all times ready to make every concession to the safety and happiness of the whole, which justice and sound policy could vindicate.

Be it therefore enacted, by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened that John Langdon, John Pickering, Nicholas Gilman & Benjamin West Esquires be and hereby are appointed Commissioners, they or any two of them, are hereby authorized, and empowered, as Deputies from this State to meet at Philadelphia said Convention or any other place, to which the Convention may be adjourned, for the purposes aforesaid, there to confer with such Deputies, as are, or may be appointed by the other States for similar purposes; and with them to discuss and decide upon the most effectual means to remedy the defects of our federal Union; and to procure, and secure, the enlarged purposes which it was intended to effect, and to report such an Act, to the United States in Congress, as when agreed to by them, and duly confirmed by the several States, will effectually provide for the same.

State of New \bigg\} In the House of Representatives June 27th 1787.
Hampshire

The foregoing Bill having been read a third time, Voted that it pass to be enacted.

Sent up for Concurrence
John Sparhawk Speaker

In Senate, the same day — This Bill having been read a third time, — Voted that the same be enacted.

Jno Sullivan President.

Copy Examined

Pr Joseph Pearson Secy. (Seal appendt.) ====Delaware====

Delaware

(Seal) His Excellency Thomas Collins, Esquire, President, Captain General, and Commander in Chief of the Delaware State; To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting. Know Ye, that among the Laws of the said State, passed by the General Assembly of the same, on the third day of February, in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven, it is thus inrolled.

In the Eleventh Year of the Independence of the Delaware State

An Act appointing Deputies from this State to the Convention proposed to be held in the City of Philadelphia for the Purpose of revising the Federal Constitution.

Whereas the General Assembly of this State are fully convinced of the Necessity of revising the Federal Constitution, and adding thereto such further Provisions, as may render the same more adequate to the Exigencies of the Union; And Whereas the Legislature of Virginia have already passed an Act of that Commonwealth, appointing and authorizing certain Commissioners to meet, at the City of Philadelphia, in May next, a Convention of Commissioners or Deputies from the different States: And this State being willing and desirous of co-operating with the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the other States in the Confederation, in so useful a design.

Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly of Delaware, that George Read, Gunning Bedford, John Dickinson, Robert Bassett and Jacob Broom, Esquires, are hereby appointed Deputies from this State to meet in the Convention of the Deputies of other States, to be held at the City of Philadelphia on the Second day of May next: And the said George Read, Gunning Bedford, John Dickinson, Richard Bassett and Jacob Broom, Esquires, or any three of them, are hereby constituted and appointed Deputies from this State, with Powers to meet such Deputies as may be appointed and authorized by the other States to assemble in the said Convention at the City aforesaid, and to join with them in devising, deliberating on, and discussing, such Alterations and further Provisions as may be necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution adequate to the Exigencies of the Union; and in reporting such Act or Acts for that purpose to the United States in Congress Assembled, as when agreed to by them, and duly confirmed by the several States, may effectually provide for the same: So always and Provided, that such Alterations or further Provisions, or any of them, do not extend to that part of the Fifth Article of the Confederation of the said States, finally ratified on the first day of March, in the Year One thousand seven hundred and eighty one, which declares that “In determining Questions in the United States in Congress Assembled each State shall have one Vote.”[6]

And be it enacted, that in Case any of the said Deputies hereby nominated, shall happen to die, or to resign his or their Appointment, the President or Commander in Chief with the Advice of the Privy Council, in the Recess of the General Assembly, is hereby authorized to supply such Vacancies

Passed at Dover, \bigg\} Signed by Order of the House of Assembly
February 3d. 1787. John Cook, Speaker
  Signed by Order of the Council
Geo Craghead, Speaker.

All and singular which Premises by the Tenor of these Presents, I have caused to be Exemplified. In Testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my Name, and caused the Great-Seal of the said State to be affixed to these Presents, at New Castle the Second day of April in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and eighty seven, and in the Eleventh Year of the Independence of the United States of America

Thos Collins

Attest

Ja Booth Secy. ====Georgia====

Georgia

By the Honorable George Mathews Esquire, Captain General, Governor and Commander in Chief, in and over the said State aforesaid.

To all to whom these Presents shall come Greeting.

Know ye that John Milton Esquire, who hath Certified the annexed Copy of an Ordinance intitled “An Ordinance for the appointment of Deputies from this State for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution” — is Secretary of the said State in whose Office the Archives of the same are deposited. Therefore all due faith, Credit and Authority are and ought to be had and given the same.

In Testomony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the said State to be put and affixed at Augusta,

this Twenty fourth day of April in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and eighty seven and of our Sovereignty and Independence the Eleventh.

Geo: (Seal) Mathews

By his Honor’s Command

J. Milton Secy

An Ordinance for the appointment of Deputies from this State for the purpose of revising the Fœderal Constitution.

Be it Ordained by the Representatives of the Freemen of the State of Georgia in General Assembly met and by the Authority of the same, that William Few, Abraham Baldwin, William Pierce, George Walton William Houstoun and Nathaniel Pendleton Esquires, Be, and they are hereby appointed Commissioners, who, or any two or more of them are hereby authorized as Deputies from this State to meet such deputies as may be appointed and authorized by other States to assemble in Convention at Philadelphia and to join with them in devising and discussing all such Alterations and farther Provisions as may be necessary to render the Federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of the Union, and in reporting such an Act for that purpose to the United States in Congress Assembled as when agreed to by them, and duly confirmed by the several States, will effectually provide for the same. In case of the death of any of the said Deputies, or of their declining their appointments, the Executive are hereby authorized to supply such Vacancies.

By Order of the House

(signed) Wm Gibbons Speaker.

Augusta the 10 February 1787.

Georgia.
Secretary’s Office

The above is a true Copy from the Original Ordinance deposited in my Office.

Augusta \bigg\}  
24 April 1787 J: Milton Secy.


The State of Georgia by the grace of God, free, Sovereign and Independent.

To the Honorable William Pierce Esquire.

Whereas you the said William Pierce, are in and by an Ordinance of the General Assembly of our said State Nominated and Appointed a Deputy to represent the same in a Convention of the United States to be assembled at Philadelphia, for the Purposes of devising and discussing all such Alterations and farther Provisions as may be necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution adequate to the Exigencies of the Union.

You are therefore hereby Commissioned to proceed on the duties required of you in virtue of the said Ordinance

Witness our trusty and well beloved George Mathews Esquire, our Captain General, Governor and Commander in Chief, under his hand and our Great Seal at Augusta this Seventeenth day of April in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven and of our Sovereignty and Independence the Eleventh.

Geo: Mathews (Seal.)

By His Honor’s Command.

J. Milton. Secy.

The State of Georgia by the grace of God free, Sovereign and Independent.

To the Honorable William Few Esquire.

Whereas you the said William Few, are in and by an Ordinance of the General Assembly of our said State Nominated and appointed a Deputy to represent the same in a Convention of the United States to be assembled at Philadelphia, for the Purposes of devising and discussing all such Alterations and farther Provisions as may be necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution adequate to the Exigencies of the Union.

You are therefore hereby Commissioned to proceed on the duties required of you in virtue of the said Ordinance.

Witness our trusty and well-beloved George Mathews Esquire our Captain-General, Governor and Commander in Chief, under his hand and our Great Seal at Augusta, this seventeenth day of April in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and eighty Seven, and of our Sovereignty and Independence the Eleventh.

Geo: (Seal.) Mathews.

By His Honor’s Command

J. Milton Secy


The State of Georgia by the grace of God, free, Sovereign and Independent.

To the Honorable William Houstoun Esquire

Whereas you the said William Houstoun, are in and by an Ordinance of the General Assembly of our said State nominated and appointed a Deputy to represent the same in a Convention of the United States to be assembled at Philadelphia, for the purposes of devising and discussing all such Alterations and farther Provisions as may be necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution adequate to the Exigencies of the Union.

You are therefore hereby Commissioned to proceed on the Duties required of you in virtue of the said Ordinance.

Witness our trusty and well-beloved George Mathews Esquire, our Captain-General, Governor and Commander in Chief, under his hand and our Great Seal at Augusta, this seventeenth day of April in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven, and of our Sovereignty and Independence the Eleventh.

Geo: (Seal.) Mathews

By his Honor’s Command

J. Milton Secy ====New York[7]====

New-York.

(Seal) By His Excellency George Clinton Esquire Governor of the State of New York General and Commander in Chief of all the Militia and Admiral of the Navy of the same.

To all to whom these Presents shall come

It is by these Presents certified that John McKesson who has subscribed the annexed Copies of Resolutions is Clerk of the Assembly of this State.

In Testimony whereof I have caused the Privy Seal of the said State to be hereunto affixed this Ninth day of May in the Eleventh Year of the Independence of the said State.

Geo: Clinton.

State of New York

In Assembly February 28th 1787.

A Copy of a Resolution of the honorable the Senate, delivered by Mr Williams, was read, and is in the Words following, vizt.

Resolved, if the honorable the Assembly concur herein, that three Delegates be appointed on the part of this State, to meet such Delegates as may be appointed on the part of the other States respectively, on the second Monday in may next, at Philadelphia, for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation, and reporting to Congress, and to the several Legislatures, such alterations and Provisions therein, as shall, when agreed to in Congress, and confirmed by the several States, render the federal Constitution adequate to the Exigencies of Government, and the preservation of the Union; and that in case of such concurrence, the two Houses of the Legislature, will, on Tuesday next, proceed to nominate and appoint the said Delegates, in like manner as is directed by the Constitution of this State, for nominating and appointing Delegates to Congress.

Resolved, that this House do concur with the honorable the Senate, in the said Resolution.

In Assembly March 6th 1787.

Resolved, that the Honorable Robert Yates Esquire, and Alexander Hamilton and John Lansing, Junior Esquires, be, and they are hereby nominated by this House, Delegates on the part of this State, to meet such Delegates as may be appointed on the part of the other States respectively, on the second Monday in May next, at Philadelphia, pursuant to concurrent Resolutions of both Houses of the Legislature, on the 28th Ultimo.

Resolved, that this House will meet the Honorable the Senate, immediately, at such place as they shall appoint, to compare the Lists of Persons nominated by the Senate and Assembly respectively, as Delegates on the part of this State, to meet such Delegates as may be appointed on the part of the other States respectively, on the second Monday in May next, at Philadelphia, pursuant to concurrent Resolutions, of both Houses of the Legislature, on the 28t Ultimo.

Ordered That Mr. N. Smith deliver a Copy of the last preceding Resolution, to the Honorable the Senate.

A Copy of a Resolution of the Honorable the Senate, was delivered by Mr. Vanderbilt, that the Senate will immediately meet this House in the Assembly Chamber, to compare the Lists of Persons nominated by the Senate and Assembly respectively, as Delegates, pursuant to the Resolutions before mentioned.

The Honorable the Senate accordingly attended in the Assembly Chamber, to compare the Lists of Persons nominated for Delegates, as above mentioned.

The list of Persons nominated by the Honorable the Senate, were the Honorable Robert Yates Esquire, and John Lansing Junior, and Alexander Hamilton Esquires; and on comparing the Lists of the Persons nominated by the Senate and Assembly respectively, it appeared that the same Persons were nominated in both Lists. Thereupon, Resolved that the Honorable Robert Yates, John Lansing Junior and Alexander Hamilton Esquires, be, and they are hereby declared duly nominated and appointed Delegates, on the part of this State, to meet such Delegates as may be appointed on the part of the other States respectively, on the second Monday in May next, at Philadelphia, for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation, and reporting to Congress, and to the several Legislatures, such alterations and provisions therein, as shall, when agreed to in Congress, and confirmed by the several States, render the federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of Government, and the preservation of the Union.

True Extracts from the Journals of the Assembly
John McKesson Clk.


South Carolina[edit]

State of South Carolina.

By His Excellency Thomas Pinckney Esquire, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the State aforesaid.

To the Honorable John Rutledge Esquire

Greeting.

By Virtue of the Power and Authority in me vested by the Legislature of this State in their Act passed the eighth day of March last I do hereby Commission You the said John Rutledge as one of the Deputies appointed from this State to meet such Deputies or Commissioners as may be appointed and authorized by other of the United States to assemble in Convention at the City of Philadelphia in the Month of May next, or as soon thereafter as may be, and to join with such Deputies or Commissioners (they being duly authorized and empowered) in devising and discussing all such Alterations, Clauses, Articles and Provisions, as may be thought necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution entirely adequate to the actual Situation and future good Government of the confederated States, and that you together with the said Deputies or Commissioners or a Majority of them who shall be present (provided the State be not represented by less than two) do join in reporting such an Act, to the United States in Congress Assembled as when approved and agreed to by them, and duly ratified and confirmed by the several States will effectually provide for the Exigencies of the Union.

Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State in the City of Charleston, this tenth day of April in the Year of our Lord, One thousand seven hundred and eighty seven and of the Sovereignty and Independence of the United

States of America the Eleventh.

Thomas (Seal.) Pinckney.

By his Excellency’s Command

Peter Freneau Secretary

State of South Carolina

By His Excellency Thomas Pinckney Esquire, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the State aforesaid.

To the Honorable Charles Pinckney Esquire.

Greeting.

By Virtue of the Power and Authority in me vested by the Legislature of this State in their Act passed the eighth day of March last, I do hereby Commission you the said Charles Pinckney, as one of the Deputies appointed from this State to meet such Deputies or Commissioners as may be appointed and authorized by other of the United States to assemble in Convention at the City of Philadelphia in the Month of May next, or as soon thereafter as may be, and to join with such Deputies or Commissioners (they being duly authorized and empowered) in devising and discussing all such Alterations, Clauses, Articles and Provisions, as may be thought necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution entirely adequate to the actual Situation and future good Government of the confederated States, and that you together with the said Deputies or Commissioners or a Majority of them who shall be present (provided the State be not represented by less than two) do join in reporting such an Act, to the United States in Congress Assembled as when approved and agreed to by them and duly ratified and confirmed by the several States will effectually provide for the Exigencies of the Union.

Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State in the City of Charleston this Tenth day of April in the Year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and Eighty Seven and of the Sovereignty and Independence of the United States of America the Eleventh.

Thomas (Seal.) Pinckney

By His Excellency’s Command

Peter Freneau Secretary.


State of South-Carolina.

By His Excellency Thomas Pinckney Esquire, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the State aforesaid.

To the Honorable Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Esquire,

Greeting.

By Virtue of the Power and Authority in me vested by the Legislature of this State in their Act passed the eighth day of March last, I do hereby Commission you the said Charles Cotesworth Pinckney as one of the Deputies appointed from this State to meet such Deputies or Commissioners as may be appointed and authorized by other of the United States to assemble in Convention at the City of Philadelphia in the Month of May next or as soon thereafter as may be, and to join with such Deputies or Commissioners (they being duly authorized and empowered) in devising and discussing all such Alterations, Clauses, Articles and Provisions as may be thought necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution entirely adequate to the actual Situation and future good Government of the Confederated States, and that you together with the said Deputies or Commissioners, or a Majority of them, who shall be present (provided the State be not represented by less than two) do join in reporting such an Act to the United States in Congress Assembled as when approved and agreed to by them and duly ratified and confirmed by the several States will effectually provide for the Exigencies of the Union.

Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State in the City of Charleston this tenth day of April in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven and of the Sovereignty and Independence of the United States of America the Eleventh.

Thomas (Seal.) Pinckney.

By His Excellency’s Command

Peter Freneau Secretary.


State of South Carolina

By His Excellency Thomas Pinckney Esquire, Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the State aforesaid.

To the Honorable Pierce Butler Esquire

Greeting.

By Virtue of the Power and authority in me vested by the Legislature of this State in their Act passed the eighth day of March last, I do hereby Commission you the said Pierce Butler, as one of the Deputies appointed from this State to meet such Deputies or Commissioners as may be appointed and authorized by other of the United States to assemble in Convention at the City of Philadelphia in the Month of May next, or as soon thereafter as may be and to join with with such Deputies or Commissioners (they being duly authorised and empowered) in devising and discussing, all such Alterations, Clauses, Articles and Provisions as may be thought necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution entirely adequate to the actual Situation and future good government of the confederated States, and that you together with the said Deputies or Commissioners or a Majority of them who shall be present (provided the State be not represented by less than two) do join in reporting such an Act, to the United States in Congress Assembled as when approved and agreed to by them and duly ratified and confirmed by the several States will effectually provide for the Exigencies of the Union.

Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State in the City of Charleston this Tenth day of April in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and Eighty seven, and of the Sovereignty and Independence of the United States of America the Eleventh.

Thomas (Seal.) Pinckney.

By His Excellency’s Command

Peter Freneau Secretary.

Massachusetts[edit]

Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

(Seal Appendt.)  By His Excellency James Bowdoin Esquire Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

To the Honorable Francis Dana, Elbridge Gerry, Nathaniel Gorham, Rufus King and Caleb Strong Esquires. Greeting.

Whereas Congress did on the twenty first day of February Ao Di 1787, Resolve “that in the opinion of Congress it is expedient that on the second Monday in May next a Convention of Delegates who shall have been appointed by the several States to be held at Philadelphia for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation and reporting to Congress and the several Legislatures, such alterations and provisions therein as shall when agreed to in Congress, and confirmed by the States render the federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of government and the preservation of the Union.” And Whereas the General Court have constituted and appointed you their Delegates to attend and represent this Commonwealth in the said proposed Convention; and have by a Resolution of theirs of the tenth of March last, requested me to Commission you for that purpose.

Now therefore Know Ye, that in pursuance of the resolutions aforesaid, I do by these presents, commission you the said Francis Dana, Elbridge Gerry Nathaniel Gorham, Rufus King & Caleb Strong Esquires or any three of you to meet such Delegates as may be appointed by the other or any of the other States in the Union to meet in Convention at Philadelphia at the time and for the purposes aforesaid.

In Testimony whereof I have caused the Public Seal of the Commonwealth aforesaid to be hereunto affixed.

Given at the Council Chamber in Boston the Ninth day of April Ao Dom. 1787 and in the Eleventh Year of the Independence of the United States of America.

James Bowdoin.

By His Excellency’s Command

John Avery Junr., Secretary

Connecticut[edit]

State of Connecticut.

(Seal.) At a General Assembly of the State of Connecticut in America, holden at Hartford on the second Thursday of May, Anno Domini 1787.

An Act for appointing Delegates to meet in a Convention of the States to be held at the City of Philadelphia on the second Monday of May instant.

Whereas the Congress of the United States by their Act of the twenty first of February 1787 have recommended that on the second Monday of May instant, a Convention of Delegates, who shall have been appointed by the several States, be held at Philadelphia for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation.

Be it enacted by the Governor, Council and Representatives in General Court Assembled and by the Authority of the same.

That the Honorable William Samuel Johnson, Roger Sherman, and Oliver Ellsworth Esquires, be and they hereby are appointed Delegates to attend the said Convention, and are requested to proceed to the City of Philadelphia for that purpose without delay; And the said Delegates, and in case of sickness or accident, such one or more of them as shall actually attend the said Convention, is and are hereby authorized and empowered to Represent this State therein, and to confer with such Delegates appointed by the several States, for the purposes mentioned in the said Act of Congress that may be present and duly empowered to act in said Convention, and to discuss upon such Alterations and Provisions agreeable to the general principles of Republican Government as they shall think proper to render the federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of Government and, the preservation of the Union; And they are further directed, pursuant to the said Act of Congress to report such alterations and provisions as may be agreed to by a majority of the United States represented in Convention to the Congress of the United States, and to the General Assembly of this State.

A true Copy of Record
Examd

By George Wyllys Secy.

====Maryland====
Maryland.

An Act for the Appointment of, and conferring Powers in Deputies from this State to the fœderal Convention.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Maryland, That the Honorable James McHenry, Daniel of Saint Thomas Jenifer, Daniel Carroll, John Francis Mercer and Luther Martin Esquires, be appointed and authorised on behalf of this State, to meet such Deputies as may be appointed and authorised by any other of the United States to assemble in Convention at Philadelphia for the purpose of revising the Fœderal System, and to join with them in considering such Alterations and further Provisions as may be necessary to render the Fœderal Constitution adequate to the Exigencies of the Union and in reporting such an Act for that purpose to the United States in Congress Assembled as when agreed to by them, and duly confirmed by the several States will effectually provide for the same, and the said Deputies or such of them as shall attend the said Convention shall have full Power to represent this State for the Purposes aforesaid, and the said Deputies are hereby directed to report the Proceedings of the said Convention, and any Act agreed to therein, to the next session of the General Assembly of this State.

By the Senate May 26. 1787.[8] By the House of Delegates
Read and Assented to
May 26d 1787.
By Order J. Dorsey Clk. Read and Assented to
True Copy from the Original By Order Wm Harwood Clk.
J. Dorsey Clk. Senate.
True Copy from the Original
 
Wm Harwood Clk Ho Del.
W. Smallwood.

Attendance of Delegates.[edit]

The following list of delegates to the Federal Convention, with the available data of their attendance, has been compiled from the Records.[9] The sources of information are so readily found that references have been omitted, but in a footnote attached to each name have been given references to those items in the Records which may throw some light upon the character of the delegate in question, or upon the part taken by him in the Convention.[10] The names of those who signed the Constitution are prefixed with numbers.

1. Baldwin, Abraham,[11] of Georgia. Attended on June 11, and probably regularly thereafter.
2. Bassett, Richard,[12] of Delaware. Attended as early as May 21.
3. Bedford, Gunning,[12] of Delaware. First attendance, May 28.
4. Blair, John,[12] of Virginia. Attended as early as May 15.
5. Blount, William,[12] of North Carolina. Attended June 20—July 2; August 7 and thereafter. He was present in Congress in New York, July 4—August 3.
6. Brearley, David,[13] of New Jersey. Attended as early as May 25.
7. Broom, Jacob, of Delaware. Attended as early as May 21.
8. Butler, Pierce,[12] of South Carolina. Attended as early as May 25.
9. Carroll, Daniel,[12] of Maryland. First attended on July 9.
10. Clymer, George, of Pennsylvania. Attended May 28, but probably before, although absent on May 25.
  Davie, William Richardson, of North Carolina. Attended on May 22 or May 23; left on August 13. Approved the Constitution.
11. Dayton, Jonathan,[14] of New Jersey. Appointed, June 5; first attended on June 21.
12. Dickinson, John,[11] of Delaware. Attended on May 29. His remarks on July 25 imply previous

absence. Absent on September 15. Read signed Dickinson’s name to the Constitution.

  Ellsworth, Oliver,[15] of Connecticut. First attended on May 28. Was present in Convention

August 23. Was in New Haven August 27. Approved the Constitution.

13. Few, William,[11] of Georgia. Attended as early as May 19. Present in Congress in New

York July 4—August 3. Probably returned to Convention after August 6.

14. Fitzsimons, Thomas,[16] of Pennsylvania. Attended on May 25, and probably earlier.
15. Franklin, Benjamin,[11] of Pennsylvania. Attended on May 28, and probably earlier, although absent on May 25.
  Gerry, Elbridge,[12] of Massachusetts. First attended on May 29. Absent on August 6. Refused to sign Constitution.
16. Gilman, Nicholas,[13] of New Hampshire. Appointed June 27; first attended on July 23.
17. Gorham, Nathaniel,[16] of Massachusetts. Attended on May 28.
18. Hamilton, Alexander,[14] of New York. Attended on May 18; left Convention June 29; was in New

York after July 2; appears to have been in Philadelphia on July 13; attended Convention August 13; was in New York August 20—September 2.

  Houston, William Churchill,[15] of New Jersey. Attended as early as May 25; was absent on June 6.
  Houstoun, William,[16] of Georgia. Attended first on June 1, and probably thereafter until July 23. He probably left on July 26 or after Few’s return.
19. Ingersoll, Jared,[16] of Pennsylvania. Attended on May 28, and probably earlier, although absent on May 25.
20. Jenifer, Daniel of St. Thomas,[16] of Maryland. Commissioned on May 26; first attended on June 2.
21. Johnson, William Samuel,[17] of Connecticut. Attended on June 2, and thereafter.
22. King, Rufus,[16] of Massachusetts. Attended as early as May 21.
23. Langdon, John,[13] of New Hampshire. Appointed June 27; first attended on July 23.
  Lansing, John,[18] of New York. First attended on June 2, though he may have been present

before May 25; left on July 10. Opposed to the Constitution.

24. Livingston, William,[19] of New Jersey. First attended on June 5; absent on June 28, and July 3-19.
  McClurg, James,[16] of Virginia. Attended as early as May 15; was present July 20; and absent after August 5. Favored the Constitution.
25. McHenry, James,[11] of Maryland. Commissioned May 26; attended May 28-31; left on June 1; present August 6 and thereafter.
26. Madison, James, Jr.,[12] of Virginia. Attended on May 14 and thereafter.
  Martin, Alexander,[11] of North Carolina. Attended as early as May 25; left in the latter part of August.
  Martin, Luther,[13] of Maryland. Commissioned May 26; first attended June 9; absent August

7-12; left Convention September 4. Opposed to the Constitution.

  Mason, George,[14] of Virginia. Attended on May 17 and thereafter. Refused to sign the Constitution.
  Mercer, John Francis, of Maryland. First attended August 6; last recorded attendance August 17. Opposed to the Constitution.
27. Mifflin, Thomas,[15] of Pennsylvania. Attended on May 28, and probably before, although absent on May 25.
28. Morris, Gouverneur,[17] of Pennsylvania. Attended on May 25, and probably before; he left the Convention a few days after and was absent until July 2.
29. Morris, Robert,[15] of Pennsylvania. Attended May 25, and probably before.
30. Paterson, William,[18] of New Jersey. Attended as early as May 25, and thereafter until July

23. There is no evidence of his attendance after that date. August 21, Brearley wrote urging him to return. He probably returned to sign the Constitution.

  Pierce, William,[11] of Georgia. Attended May 31; absent after July 1. He favored the Constitution.
31. Pinckney, Charles,[19] of South Carolina. Attended May 17 and thereafter.
32. Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth,[11] of South Carolina. Attended at least as early as May 25, and thereafter.
  Randolph, Edmund,[16] of Virginia. Attended May 15 and thereafter. He refused to sign the Constitution.
33. Read, George,[11] of Delaware. Attended at least as early as May 19.
34. Rutledge, John,[16] of South Carolina. Attended on May 17, and thereafter.
35. Sherman, Roger,[12] of Connecticut. Appointed May 17; attended May 30 and thereafter.
36. Spaight, Richard Dobbs,[11] of North Carolina. Attended as early as May 19, and thereafter.
  Strong, Caleb,[11] of Massachusetts. Attended on May 28; was present on August 15, but left before August 27. He favored the Constitution.
37. Washington, George,<reef name="fn4">Appendix A, ⅩⅦ, ⅭⅩⅨ, ⅭⅬⅧ (8), ⅭⅭⅬⅩⅩⅩⅤ, ⅭⅭⅩⅭⅢ, ⅭⅭⅭⅬⅨ.</ref> of Virginia. Attended on May 14 and thereafter.
38. Williamson, Hugh,[14] of North Carolina. Attended as early as May 25, and thereafter.
39. Wilson, James,[16] of Pennsylvania. Attended as early as May 25 (probably before) and thereafter.
  Wythe, George,[11] of Virginia. Attended as early as May 15; left Convention June 4; resigned June 16. He approved the Constitution.
  Yates, Robert,[15] of New York. Attended May 18; left Convention July 10. Opposed to the Constitution.

  1. Those whose names are in parentheses did not attend. An alphabetical list of the delegates with the dates of attendance, etc., will be found at the end of this appendix.
  2. Philadelphia newspapers of May 19, 1787, in their lists of delegates included the names of John Sparhawk and Pierce Long from New Hampshire.
  3. “There was a passage at arms between the Rev. John Blair Smith, president of Hampden-Sydney College in Prince Edward county, and Patrick Henry, who represented that county in the Convention. Henry had inveighed with great severity against the Constitution, and was responded to by Dr. Smith, who pressed the question upon Henry, why he had not taken his seat in the Convention and lent his aid in making a good Constitution, instead of staying at home and abusing the work of his patriotic compeers? Henry, with that magical power of acting in which he excelled all his contemporaries, and which before a popular assembly was irresistible, replied: ‘I smelt a Rat.’” (H.B. Grigsby, History of the Virginia Federal Convention of 1788, I, 32.)
  4. “The Assembly have directed the same allowance to be made the Deputies as is granted to the Delegates to Congress to be paid by the Governor’s Warrant on the Collectors of Imports out of the monies now due for Goods Imported.” (Governor Caswell to each Delegate, January 7, 1787, North Carolina State Records, ⅩⅩ, 600.)
  5. No action was taken under the previous resolution, and a further act became necessary.

    “The representations of this State, even at that late day, were secured only by urgent efforts from abroad and extraordinary efforts at home. The finances of the State were in a deplorable condition and it is impossible to realize at the present time what the undertaking was to provide cash for any considerable public enterprise. It was currently reported in the newspapers of the day that the expenses of Mr. Gillman and himself were defrayed out of Mr. Langdon’s private purse.” New Hampshire State Papers, ⅩⅩ, 842, citing 2 New Hampshire Historical Society Proceedings, 28.

  6. George Read to John Dickinson.

    New Castle, January 17th, 1787.

    Dear Sir, — Finding that Virginia hath again taken the lead in the proposed convention at Philadelphia in May, as recommended in our report when at Annapolis, as by an act of their Assembly, passed the 22d of November last, and inserted in Dunlap’s paper of the 15th of last month, it occurred to me, as a prudent measure on the part of our State, that its Legislature should, in the act of appointment, so far restrain the powers of the commissioners, whom they shall name on this service, as that they may not extend to any alteration in that part of the fifth article of the present Confederation, which gives each State one vote in determining questions in Congress, and the latter part of the thirteenth article, as to future alterations, — that is, that such clause shall be preserved or inserted, for the like purpose, in any revision that shall be made and agreed to in the proposed convention. I conceive our existence as a State will depend upon our preserving such rights, for I consider the acts of Congress hitherto, as to the ungranted lands in most of the larger States, as sacrificing the just claims of the smaller and bounded States to a proportional share therein, for the purpose of discharging the national debt incurred during the war; and such is my jealousy of most of the larger States, that I would trust nothing to their candor, generosity, or ideas of public justice in behalf of this State, from what has heretofore happened, and which, I presume, hath not escaped your notice. But as I am generally distrustful of my own judgment, and particularly in public matters of consequence, I wish your consideration of the prudence or propriety of the Legislature’s adopting such a measure, and more particularly for that I do suppose you will be one of its commissioners. Persuaded I am, from what I have seen occasionally in the public prints and heard in private conversations, that the voice of the States will be one of the subjects of revision, and in a meeting where there will be so great an interested majority, I suspect the argument or oratory of the smaller State commisioners will avail little. In such circumstances I conceive it will relieve the commissioners of the State from disagreeable argumentation, as well as prevent the downfall of the State, which would at once become a cypher in the union, and have no chance of an accession of district, or even citizens; for, as we presently stand, our quota is increased upon us, in the requisition of this year, more than thirteen-eightieths since 1775, without any other reason that I can suggest than a promptness in the Legislature of this State to comply with all the Congress requisitions from time to time. This increase alone, without addition, would in the course of a few years banish many of its citizens and impoverish the remainder; therefore, clear I am that every guard that can be devised for this State’s protection against future encroachment should be preserved or made. I wish your opinion on the subject as soon as convenient.


    W.T. Read, Life and Correspondence of George Read, pp. 438-439.

  7. Before New York took action, Congress formally authorized the convention in Philadelphia. As subsequent credentials were to some extent influenced by the Resolution of Congress, it seems best to insert it here, although it is given in Appendix A, I.

    By

    By The United States in Congress Assembled 

    February 21st 1787.

    Whereas there is provision in the Articles of Confederation and perpetual Union, for making alterations therein, by the assent of a Congress of the United States, and of the legislatures of the several States; and whereas experience hath evinced, that there are defects in the present confederation, as a mean to remedy which, several of the States, and particularly the State of New-York, by express instructions to their Delegates in Congress, have suggested a Convention for the purposes expressed in the following Resolution; and such Convention appearing to be the most probable means of establishing in these States a firm national Government.

    Resolved, That in the opinion of Congress, it is expedient, that on the second Monday in May next, a Convention of Delegates, who shall have been appointed by the several States, be held at Philadelphia, for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation, and reporting to Congress and the several Legislatures, such alterations and provisions therein, as shall, when agreed to in Congress, and confirmed by the States, render the federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of Government, and the preservation of the Union.

  8. The delegates had been previously elected by the legislature, April 23-May 22. “The assembly had voted to pay the delegates as delegates in congress were paid.” (Steiner, Life and Correspondence of James McHenry, 98 note 1.)
  9. Although the number of delegates who were at any time present in Philadelphia amounts to fifty-five, the average attendance at the sessions was decidedly smaller. The editor estimates the average attendance at forty or less. In his History of the Virginia Federal Convention of 1788 (Vol. Ⅰ, p. 34) H. B. Grigsby states that that body consisted of one hundred and seventy members. He adds: “It was more than four times greater than the Convention which formed the Federal Constitution when that body was full, and it exceeded it, as it ordinarily was, more than six times.”
  10. The following items deal with the delegates in general rather than with individuals: Appendix A, , ⅩⅩⅩⅡ, ⅩⅩⅩⅣ, ⅩⅩⅩⅦ, ⅩⅬ, ⅩⅬⅧ, ⅩⅬⅨ, ⅬⅨ, ⅬⅩⅩⅥ, ⅩⅭⅧ, ⅭⅩⅨ, ⅭⅭⅩⅩⅩⅢ, ⅭⅭⅩⅬⅢ, ⅭⅭⅭⅭⅠ.
  11. 11.00 11.01 11.02 11.03 11.04 11.05 11.06 11.07 11.08 11.09 11.10 11.11 Appendix A, ⅭⅩⅨ, ⅭⅬⅨ.
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 12.5 12.6 12.7 12.8 Appendix A, ⅭⅩⅨ.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 Appendix A, ⅭⅩⅨ, ⅭⅭⅭⅬⅩⅩⅦ.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 Appendix A, ⅭⅩⅨ, ⅭⅬⅨ, ⅭⅭⅭⅬⅩⅩⅥ.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 Appendix A, ⅭⅩⅨ, ⅭⅬⅨ, ⅭⅭⅭⅩⅭⅨ.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 16.7 16.8 16.9 Appendix A, ⅭⅩⅨ.
  17. 17.0 17.1 Appendix A, ⅭⅭⅭⅭⅡ.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Appendix A, ⅭⅩⅨ, ⅭⅭⅭⅩⅩⅩⅨ, ⅭⅭⅭⅩⅭⅡ.
  19. 19.0 19.1 Appendix A, ⅭⅩⅨ, ⅭⅬⅨ, ⅭⅭⅭⅬⅩⅩⅥ.