The Times/1919/News/Funeral of the Dean of Norwich

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Funeral of the Dean of Norwich  (1911) 
Henry Charles Beeching (1859–1919)

Source: Funeral. The Times, Tuesday, Mar 04, 1919; pg. 13; Issue 42039; col B — The Dean of Norwich

The Dean of Norwich

The funeral of the Dean of Norwich, Dr. Beeching, too place in Norwich Cathedral yesterday. The cremated ashes were brought in a bronze urn from Golders Green on Saturday and were placed in the Jesus Chapel until yesterday, when they were removed to the Sanctuary. The place of burial was at the back of the apse behind the high alter and facing the site of the proposed war memorial in the chapel in which the Dean had taken so much interest. The mourners were Mrs. Beeching, Dr. Robert Bridges, the Poet Laureate, Mr. Percy Barnett, brother-in-law, Miss Beeching, the Rev. A. A. and Mrs. Guest-Williams (son-in-law and daughter), Lieutenant E. and Mrs. Fanning (son-in-law and daughter), Captain W. K. Guest Williams, Mr. Denis de Vitre (brother-in-law), Captain Noel Green (nephew), Lieutenant Sydney Frankenberg (nephew), Mr. Whitwell, Dr. Nairne, and Mr. Matheson.

The Lord Mayor of Norwich, the Sheriff and the Deputy Lord Mayor, with many members of the Corporation, entered the choir in procession shortly before 2.30, and were followed almost immediately by the funeral procession, in which a large number of the local clergy took part. Behind the choir came the cathedral clergy and officials, the Bishop preceded by his chaplain, the Rev. A. L. Watt, and followed by his honorary chaplains, Canon de Chair and Canon Washington. Lastly followed the family mourners. The service included the singing of "Lord Jesus, thy dear angel send," from Bach's Passion music, and the prayers up to the committal having been read by the Bishop of Thetford, the procession passed on to the place of burial, where after singing of "O Saviour of the world" (Palestrina) the committal sentences were said by the Bishop. The Russian Contakion ("Give rest, O Christ") was sung, and the service concluded with the Benediction and the 'Nunc Dimittis."


This work was published before January 1, 1923 and it is anonymous or pseudonymous due to unknown authorship. It is in the public domain in the United States as well as countries and areas where the copyright terms of anonymous or pseudonymous works are 91 years or less since publication.