The Triumph of an Idea

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The Triumph of an Idea: The Story of Henry Ford  (1934) 
by Ralph Henry Graves
Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1934 OCLC 1248769all editions

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Ford Exposition Edition, Price 50c

The advent of the automobile brought a clash of industrial ideas. Should the new vehicle be high-priced, obtainable only by the wealthy? Or should it be a vehicle of service to all humanity—within reach of the pocketbook of EVERY family? Henry Ford's answer was the Model T, which became known as the "Universal Car" and of which he manufactured more than 15,000,000.

With the Ford car available to the millions, there sprang up a nation-wide demand for better roads. The Ford car proved a great SOCIAL factor in the development and growth of the American people. And the story of the founding, success, and growth of the Ford Motor Co., giving the world, as it did, its first great picture of modern mass production, is an industrial epic which this volume attempts to tell.

It is a story of facts that less than a generation ago would have been a fairy tale.

Illustrated by 52 photographs.

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THE TRIUMPH OF AN IDEA

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The Triumph of an Idea.djvu-6.png

HENRY FORD

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THE


TRIUMPH OF AN IDEA


THE STORY OF HENRY FORD


By

Ralph H. Graves


The Triumph of an Idea.djvu-7.png

ILLUSTRATIONS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS


Garden City, New York

Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc.

1934

 

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PRINTED AT THE Country Life Press, GARDEN CITY, N.Y., U.S.A.


COPYRIGHT, 1934
BY RALPH H. GRAVES
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

FIRST EDITION

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CONTENTS

Chapter Page
I A Lone Pioneer 1
II The Beginning of an Industry 16
III Performance and Profits 33
IV The "Universal Car," Model T 49
V Wartimes and Afterward 67
VI The Rebuilding of an Industry 98
VII A "Universal Car" Again: The V-8 126
VIII Dearborn, the Wonder Town 160

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THE TRIUMPH OF AN IDEA

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was legally published within the United States (or the United Nations Headquarters in New York subject to Section 7 of the United States Headquarters Agreement) before 1964, and copyright was not renewed.
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For other renewal records of publications between 1922 - 1950 see the Pennsylvania copyright records scans.
For all records since 1978, search the U.S. Copyright Office records.

Works published in 1934 would have had to renew their copyright in either 1961 or 1962, i.e. at least 27 years after it was first published / registered but not later than 31 December(31 December) in the 28th year. As it was not renewed, it entered the public domain on 1 January 1963(1 January 1963).