The World as Will and Representation/Translators' Preface

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THE style of " Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellung " is sometimes loose and involved, as is so often the case in German philosophical treatises. The translation of the book has consequently been a matter of no little difficulty. It was found that extensive alteration of the long and occasionally involved sentences, however likely to prove conducive to a satisfactory English style, tended not only to obliterate the form of the original but even to imperil the meaning. Where a choice has had to be made, the alternative of a somewhat slavish adherence to Schopenhauer's ipsissima verba has accordingly been preferred to that of inaccuracy. The result is a piece of work which leaves much to be desired, but which has yet consistently sought to reproduce faithfully the spirit as well as the letter of the original.

As regards the rendering of the technical terms about which there has been so much controversy, the equivalents used have only been adopted after careful consideration of their meaning in the theory of knowledge. For example, "Vorstellung" has been rendered by "idea," in preference to "representation," which is neither accurate, intelligible, nor elegant. "Idee," is translated by the same word, but spelled with a capital,—"Idea." Again, "Anschauung" has been rendered according to the context, either by "perception" simply, or by "intuition or perception."

Notwithstanding statements to the contrary in the text, the book is probably quite intelligible in itself, apart from the treatise "On the Fourfold Root of the Principle of Sufficient Reason." It has, however, been considered desirable to add an abstract of the latter work in an appendix to the third volume of this translation.

R. B. H.
J. K.