The late war, between the United States and Great Britain, from June, 1812, to February, 1815

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Late war, between the United States and Great Britain, from June, 1812, to February, 1815  (1819) 
by Gilbert J. Hunt

THE LATE WAR BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN,

From June, 1812, to February, 1815.

"WRITTEN IN THE ANCIENT HISTORICAL STYLE..

BY GILBERT J. HUNT.

& The good of his country was the pride of his heart"

.Decatur's victory.


CONTAINING, ALSO, A SKETCH OF THE.LATE

ALGERIN T E WAR;

And the Treaty concluded with the Dey of Algiers Commercial Treaty with Great Britain, and the Treaty concluded with the Creek Nation oi" Indians.

THIRD EDITION.

With improvements by the author.


PUBLISHED BY DANIEL D. SJMITIJ, No. 190, GFfeenwich-Streef.

1819-


Southern District of New-York, M.


B


it remembered, that on the thirty first day of October, in the forty second year of the Independence of the Lionel States of America, G. J. Hunt, of the said District, hath deposited in this office the title of a. book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor in the words and figures following, to wit : " The Late War between the United States and Great Britain, from June 1812 to February 1815, written in the ancient historical style, by Gilbert J. Hunt, author of a numbet •f anonymous publications in prose and verse.

" The good of his country was the pride of his heart." ^

Dfcaturs Victory.

Containing, also, a sketch of the late Algerine War ; and the Treaty concluded with the Dey of Algiers ; the Commercial Treaty with Great Britain, and the Treaty concluded with the Creek nation of Indians."

In conformity to the act of the congress of the Uni- ted States, entitled, " an act for the encouragement of learniug, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the time therein mentioned." And also to an act, entitled "an act supplementary to an act, entitled an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the -arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and Other prints,"

JAMES DILL, Clerk of the Southern District of JV, York


FACE.


T.HE advantage? which the introduction of this- work into our seninaries of education would be likely to produce are man) 7 and obvious :

1. The author having adopted for the model of hi* st) 7 le the phraseology of the best of books, remarkable for its simplicity and strength, the young pupil will ac- quire, with the knowledge of reading, a love for the manner in which the great truths of Divine Revelation are conveyed to his understanding, and this will be an inducement to him to study the Holy Scriptures.

2 All the circumstances related in this, work are true ; they are recent, being within the recollection of the present generation ; they form a very important part in the history of our country, and will be read with pride and pleasure by every one of our ycang men in whose bosom may glow the sentiments of patriotism ancfpiety.

3. The most prominent virtues of the heroes who produced the events here treated of. are held up is* such a manner as to inspire in the youthful mind a love for the country they defended, and a spirit of honorable emulation, which may be highly advanta- geous to that country whenever it shall be necessary ta call it into exercise.

4. Although a vein of morality runs through the work, the sentiments have not the smallest bearing oi» the particular tenets of any religious sect, but are cal- culated to be read by ail persons, of whatever denomi- natrjn, who love virtue, valor, aad freedom.

5. The facts described are related in so clear and concise a way as without much effort on the part of the pupil, will easily fasten themselves on his memory.

These are some amongst other reasons which have induced the author to recommend his little work to


& PREFACE.

teachers of youth throughout the United States, as well as fathers of families, and he does it in the confi- dent hope, that it will prove useful in accelerating the progress of knowledge, and in awakening and cherish- ing in the minds of his young countrymen those prin- ciples of virtue with which he has been careful that it should be interwoven.

Having received the universal approbation of men of judgment, he only thinks it necessary to give the following letters from Dr. S. L. Mitchill, and Mr. Picket,

G. J. HUNT.

New-York, June 13, 1817-

Sir,

I had noticed your work on the late war long Ibefore I had the pleasure of your acquaintance. It seems to be a plain and popular mode of exhibiting the transactions of which it treats.

One -of the defects in the literature of our country is that of gooH historians. That class of our citizens which is called to act, shows unparalleled atchievement and enterprize. The other sections, to whom is allot- ted the business of narrating and recording events, are not so far advanced, the reason is evident ; there must be deeds to describe and perpetuate, before there can be historians. Tn process of time, writers duly qualified, will make their appearance.

Your Chronicle of events deserves to b? mentioned in the list of useful publications. It will answer as a dotunent of constant and ready reference. The re- ception of it into schools, will render familiir to chil- dren the chief actions in the contest, and teach them, at the same time, to respect their country and its institu- tions.

It seems to rae one of the best attempts to imitate Sie biblical style ; and if the perusal of it can induce young persons to relish and love the sacred books


PREFACE. *

whose language you have imitated, it will be the strong- est of all recommendations.

Your r 3 respectfully. SAMUEL L. MITCHILL. Mr. G. J. Hunt.

Academy, New-York, July 8, 1817". &V,

I have examined the copy, and concur in tlte recommendation of the publication of your '* Histori- cal Reader, with the alterations and improvements, for the Use of Schools. I sincerely hope that your exerliorrs may be crowned with success.

Yours respectfully, Mr. G. J. Hunt. J. W. PICKET.


TABLE OF CONTENTS.


PAbE

CHAP I — President's Message — Causes of the

War. Sfc. 9

CHAP. II — Report of the Committee — Decla- ration of tear. 1 3

CHAP. Ill — Reception of the Declaration of

War in Great Britain. 15

CHAP. IV— John Henry— Elijah Parish. )9

CHAP. V — American Army — Militia — Navy — British Navy — Rogers' first cruise — cap- ture of the Nautilus — removal of aliens beyond tide-water. 21

CHAP. VI— Hull's expedition. 23

CHAP. VII — HulVs trial and pardon — Capture

of Michilimackinack. 2-5

\


vi TABLE OF CONTENTS.

CHAP. VHI — Capture of the Gurriere, bj tt,e

United States' frigate Constitution. ob

CHAP. IX — Attack on Sackett's Harbcvr — of-. fair of Ogdengburgh — British drove from St. Regis. 33

CHAP. X— Battle of Qucenstowv. 36

CHAP. XI — Gen. Smythe succeeds, Gen. Van Rensselaer — his attempts to cross the Ni- agara, and failure — catisns. 39 CHAP. XII— Capture of the British Sloop of

war. Frolic. 41

CHAP: XIII — Capture of the Macedonian. 43

CHAP. XIV — Affairs in the north — skirmishes — battle of Frenchttxon — capture of Gen. Winchester's army — massacre of Amer. prisoners. 47

CHAP. XV— Capture of the British frigate Java 52 CHAP. XVI — Corp,. Rogers return from a se- cond cruise — the Gen. Armstrong and a British frigate — privateering. 56

CHAP. ~XYI1— Capture of Ogdensburgh 60

CHAP. XVfil— Capture of the Peacock C2

CHAP. XIX— Capture of Utile York. 66

CHAP. XX — Sketches of the History of America. 74 CAHP. XXI — Depredations in the Chesapeake — Havre-de-Grace burnt — attack on Cra- ny Island — Hampton taken by the British — outrages. IT

CHAP. XXII— Bayard and Gallatin sail for St. Petersburgh — the British compelled to a- bandon the siege of fort Meigs. 82

CHAP. XXIII— Surrender of forts George and Erie to the Americans — General Br men drives the Britishfrom Sacketfs Harbor $4 CHAP. XXIV— Capture of the Chesapeake. 87

CHAP. XXV— Capture of Col Boerstler and

Major Cliapin, with their command. 92

CHAP. XXVI -Capture of Fort Schhsscr and

Mlmk Rock Q5


TABLE OF CONTENTS. xn

CHAP. XXVII— Affairs on Lake Ontario. 97

CHAP. XXVIII— Affairs on Lake Champlain. V9

CHAP. XXIX Major Croghan defeats the

British at Fort Stephenson. 102

CHAP. XXX — British schooner Dominica cap- tured — U. S. brig Argus captured. — Boxer Sf Enterprize. 105

C HAP. XXXI— Capture of the British feet on

Lake. Erie 109

CHAP. XXXII— Capture of Maiden and De- troit, by Gen. Harrison. 114 CHAP. XXXUI— Battle of the Thames. 118 CHAP. XKXIV— War with the Creeks. 123 CHAP. XXXV — Continuation of the Creek

W'-r — Gen. Jackson's victory over them. 125 CHAP. XXXVI — Plan of attack on Montreal

defeated. 13 J

CHAP. XXXVII— Newark burnt— Fort George evacuated — Niagara frontier laid waste — Buffalo burnt. 135

CHAP XXXVIII— Cruise of the Essex. 138

CHAP. XXXIX— Captureof the Frolic, by the British frigate Orpheus — capture of the UEpnrvipr, by the Peacock— capture of the Reindeer, by the Wasp, capt. Blakely — the Avon captured and sunk. 145

CHAP. XL — Breaking up of the cantonments at

French Mills — battle of Ghippawa. 146

CHAP. XLI — Rattle nf Bridgwater. 150

CHAP. XLI I— Assault on Fort Erie. 153

CH\P. XLHI— Attack on Stonington, by the

British ships of war 157

CHAP. XLIV — Affairs in the Chesapeake — British array move towards Washington — prepare for battle at Bl idensburgh. 16©

CHAP. XLV — Capture of Wtahingttm— sack- ing of Alexandria — detth of Sir Peter Parlor. f$2

€HAP. XLYI— British go against Platishurgi


«v21 TABLE OF CONTENTS.

. — Com. SFDonoitgh captures the British squadron on Lake Champlain 171

• C HA P. \h\ll— Battle of Pittsburgh. 1?6

-*CiL-\P. XLVISi — Attack on Baltimore, by the British army under Gen. Ross, and, the feet under Admirals Cochrane and Cock- "burn. 179

CHAP. XL1X — rDestruction of the privateer 1 Gen. Armstrong — Gen. Jackson captures Pcnsacola, and returns to N. Orleans. 186

CHAP. L — Steam-boats — Fulton — torpedoes —

kidnapping Joshua Penny. 190

CHAP, hi— Affairs in and about N. York. 197

CHAP- LII — Affairs on the ocean 206

CHAP. LIU — British feet arrives near N. Or- leans — attacks by the British upon the army of Gen. Jackson. 211

"CHAP. L1V — Grand Battle of New-Orleans. 2lG CHAP. LY— Peace. 221

Algerine War. 225

Conclusion. 231

.Bible Societies and Sunday Schools? 2S4


THL

HISTORY

OF THE

LATE WAR

BETWEEN THE

U. STATES AtW G c BRITAIN.


CHAP. L

President's Message — Causes of the War — Energetic Measures proposed.


N<


OW it came to pass, in the one thousand eight handled and twelfth year of the christian era, and in the thirty and sixth year after the people of the pro- vinces of Columbia bad declared themselves a free and independent nation ;

2 That in the sixth month of the same year, on the first day of the month, the chief Governor, whom the people had chosen to rule over the land of Columbia 5

3 Even James, whose sir-name was Madison, de- livered a written paper to the Great Sanhedrim of the people, who were assembled together.

4 And the name of the city where the people were

gathered together was called after the name of the chief

captain of the land of Columbia, whose fame extendeth

to the uttermost parts of the earth ; albeit, he had slept

with his fathers.

B


1(5 LATE

5 Nevertheless, the people loved him, forasmuch as he wrought their deliverance from the yoke of tyranny in times past ; so they called the city Wash- ington.

6 Now, when the written paper was received, the doors of the chambers of the Great Sanhedrim were closed, and a seal was put upon every man's mouth.

7 And the counsellors of the nation, and the wise men thereof, ordered the written paper which James had de- livered unto them to be read aloud ; and the interpreta- tion thereof was in this wise :

8 Lo ! the lords and the princes of the kingdom of Britain, in the fulness of their pride and power, have trampled upon the altar of Liberty, and violated the sanctuary thereof :

9 Inasmuch as they hearkened not unto the voice of moderation, when the cry of the 'people of Columbia was, Peace ! peace !

10 Inasmuch as they permitted not the tall ships of Columbia to sail in peace on the waters of the mighty deep ; saving in their hearts, Of these will we make spoil, and they shall Be given unto the king.

11 Inasmuch as they robbed the ships of Columbia of the Strong men that wrought therein, and took them for their own use, even as a man taketh his ox or his ass.

12 Inasmuch as they keot the men stolen from the ships cf Columbia in bondage many years, and caused them <o fight the hattVs of the king, even against their 0we I r-. hreta ! neit! er gave they unto them silver or gol ', butmahy t;ipes.

J3 Nov/ the nun of Columbia were not liks unto


WAR. U

the men of Britain ; for their backs were not harden- ed unto the whip, as were the servants of the king ; therefore they murmured, and their murmurings have been heard.

14 Moreover, the Council of Britain sent forth a De- cree to all the nations of the earth, sealed with the signet of the Prince Regent, who governed the nation in the name of the king his father ; for lo ! the king was pos* se.'5sed of an evil spirit, and his son reigned in his stead.

15 Now this Decree of the Council of Britain was a grievous thing, inasmuch as it permitted not those who dealt in merchandize to go whithersoever they chose, and to trade freely with all parts of the earth.

16 And it fell hard upon the people of Columbia; for the king said unto them, Ye shall come with your vessels unto me and pay tribute, then may ye depart to another country.

17 Now these things pleased the pirates and the

" "„••.-• ,J  ;1 " '-^! ise it permitted them to erasers ot Driiammigmuj, «,*w

rob the commerce of Columbia with impunity.

18 Furthermore, have not the servants of the king leagued with the savages of the wilderness, and given unto them silver and gold, and placed the destroying en- gines iu their hands ?

19 Thereby stirring up the spirit of Satan within them, that they might spill the blood of the people of Columbia ; even the blood of our old men, our wives, and our little ones !

20 Thus, had Britain, in her heart, commenced War gainst the people of Columbia, whilst they cried aloud lor peace : and when she smote them on the one cheek ibey turned unto her the other also.


L2 LATE

21 Now, therefore, shall we, the independent people of Columbia, sit down silently, as slaves, and bow the neck to Britain ?

22 Or, shall we, like ©ur forefathers, nobly assert our fights, and defend that Liberty and Independence ^bich the Lord hath given unto us ?


WAR. 13

CHAP. II.

Report of the Committee— Declaration of War.


N« 


OW, when there was an end made of reading the paper which James had written, the Sanhedrim com- muned one with another touching the matter :

2 And they chose certain wise men from among them to deliberate thereon.

3 And they commanded them to go forth from their presence, for that purpose, and return again on the third day of the same month.

4 Now, when the third day arrived, at the eleventh hour of the day, they came forth and presented them= selves before the Great Sanhedrim of the people.

5 And the chief of the wise men, whom they had chosen, opened his mouth and spake unto them after this manner :

6 Behold ! day and night have we meditated upon the words which James hath delivered, and we are weary withal, for in our hearts we desired peace.

7 But the wickedness of the kingdom of Great- Britain, and the cruelty of the princes thereof, towards the peaceable inhabitants of the land of Columbia, may be likened unto the fierce lion, when he putteth his paw upon the innocent lamb to devour him.

8 Nevertheless, the lamb shall not be slain ; for the Lord shall be his deliverer.

9 And if, peradventure, the people of Columbia -go

b 2


14 LATE ,

not out to battle against the king, then will the menifold wrongs committed against them be increased tenfold, and they shall be as a mock and a bye-word among all nations.

10 Moreover, the righteousness of your cause shall kad you to glory, and the pillars of your liberty shall not be shaken.

1 1 Therefore, say we unto you, Gird on your swords and go forth to battle against the king ; even against the strong powers of Britain ; and the Lord God of Hosts be with you.

12 Now when the great Sanhedrim of the people heard those things which the wise men had uttered, they pondered them in their minds many days, and weighed t&em well j

13 Even until the seventeenth day of the month pon- dered they in secret concerning the matter.

14 And it was so, that on the next day they sent forth a Decree, making WAR upon the kingdom of Great Britain, and upon the servants, and upon the slaves thereof.

15 And the Decree was signed with the hand writing <©f James, the chief Governor of the land of Columbia.

16 After these things, the doors of the chambers of the Sanhedrim were opened.


WAR. 15


CHAP. III.


Reception of the Declaration of War in Great Britain — her friends in America — Caleb Stro?ig — Hartford Convention.


A:


.ND it came to pass, that when the princes and the lords and the counsellors of Britain saw the Decree, their wrath was kindled, and their hearts were ready to burst with indignation.

2 For, verily, sairl they, this insult hath overflowed the cup of our patience ; and now will we chastise the impudence of these Yankees, and the people of Colum- bia shall bow before the king.

3 Then will we rule them with a rod of iron ; and they shall be, unto us, hewers of wood and drawers of water.

4 For, verily, shall we suffer these cunning Yankees to beard the mighty lion, with half a dozen fir-built frigates, the men whereof are but mercenary cowards — ■ " bastards and outlaws ?"

5 Neither durst they array themselves in battle against the men of Britain. No ! we will sweep them from the face of the waters, and their name shall be heard no more among nations.

6 Shall the proud conquerors of Europe not laugh to scorn the feeble efforts of a few unorganized soldiers, un- disciplined, and fresh from the plough, the hoe, and the mattock ?

7 Yea, they shall surely fall ; for they were not bred to fighting as were the servants of the king.


16 LATE

8 Their large cities, their towns, and their villages will we burn with consuming fire.

9 Their oil, and their wheat} and their rye, and their" corn, and their barley, and their rice, and their buck- wheat, and their oats, and their flax, and all the products of their country will we destroy, and scatter the remnants thereof to the four winds of heaven.

10 All these things, and more, will we do unto this froward people.

1 1 Neither shall there be found safety for age or sex from the destroying swords of the soldiers of the king ;

12 Save in those provinces and towns where dwell the friends of the king , for, lo ! said they, the king's friends are many.

13 These will we spare; neither will we hurt a hair •f their heads : nor shall the savages of the wilderness stain the scalping-knife or the tomahawk with the blood of the king's friends.

14 Now it happened, about this time, that there were numbers of the inhabitants of the country of Columbia whose hearts yearned after the king of Britain.

1 5 And with their false flattering words they led as- tray some of the friends of Columbian Liberty ; for their tongues were smoother than oil.

16 Evil machinations entered into their hearts, and the poison of their breath might be likened unto the deadly Bohon Upas, which rears its lefty branches in the barren valley of Java.*

  • Of the existence of this wonderful tree there have

been doubts : but the reader is referred to the relation of P. N. Foerch, icho has given a satisfactory account of it, from Ms own travels in its neighbourhood.


WAR. 17

17 And they strove to dishearten the true friends of the great Sanhedrim ; but they prevailed not.

1 8 Moreover, Satan entered into the heart of one of the governors of the east, and he was led astray by the wickedness thereof, even Caleb the Strong.

19 Now Caleb, which in the Cherokee tongue, signi- fieth an ass, liked not the decree of the great Sanhedrim, inasmuch as he favored the king of Britain ;

20 And, though willing to become a beast of burden, yet would he not move on account of his very great stu- pidity.

21 And he said unto the captains of the hosts of the state orer which he presided, Lo ! it seemeth not meet unto me that ye go forth to battle against the king.

22 For, Lo ! are not the fighting men of Britain, in multitude, as the sand oh the sea shore ? and shall we prevail against them ?

23 Are not the mighty ships of the king spread over the whole face of the waters ? Is not Britain the " bul- wark of our religion ?"

24 Therefore, I command that ye go not out to bat- tle, but every man remain in his own house.

25 And all the governors of the east listened unto the voice of Caleb.

26 Moreover, the angel of the Lord whispered into the ear of Caleb, and spake unto him, saying,

27 If, peradventure, thou dost refuse to obey the laws of ftie land, the thing will not be pleasant in the sight of the Lord ;

28 Inasmuch as it may cause the people to rise up one against another, and spill the blood of their own children ;

29 And the time of warfare will be lengthened out, and the blood of thousands wiil be upon thine hoad.


38 LATE

SO And Satan spake, and said unto Caleb, Fear not ; for if thou wilt forsake thy country, and throw off the paltry subterfuge of Columbian Liberty, and defy the councils of the great Sanhedrim,

31 Then shall thy name be proclaimed with the sound of the trumpet throughout all the earth ; and thou shalt be a prince and a ruler over this people.

32 Now the smooth words of Satan tickled Caleb mightily, and he hearkened unto the counsel of the wicked one :

33 For the good counsel given unto him was as wa- ter thrown upon a rock.

34 But when the chief governor and the great Sanhe- drim of the people saw the wickedness of Caleb, their hearts were moved with pity towards him and his follow- ers : yea, even those who had made a convention at the little town of Hartford.

35 Neither doth the scribe desire to dwell upon the wickedness which came into the village of Harttof d, thg signification of the name whereof, in the vernacular tongue, appeareth not.

36 For the meddling therewith is as the green pool of tmclean waters, when a man casteth a stone therein.


WAR. -ifr


CHAP. IV.

John Henry — Elijah Parish >


L


I ET the children of Columbia beware of false pro- phets which come in sheep's clothing ; for it is written, Ye shall know them by their fruits.

2 Now it came to pass, that a certain man, whose sir- name was Henry, came before James, the chief go- vernor, and opened his mouth, and spake unto him, say- in?)

3 Lo ! If thou wilt give unto me two score and ten thousand pieces of silver, then will I unfold unto thee the witchcraft of Britain, that thereby thy nation may not be caught in her snares.

4 And James said unto him, Verily, for the good of my country I will do this thing.

5 And immediately the man Henry opened his mouth, a second time, and said,

6 Lo ! the lords and counsellors of Britain have made a covenant with me, and have promised me many pieces of gold if I would make a league with the pro- vinces of the east that they might favour the king ; and long and faithfully have I laboured in their cause.

7 But they deceived me, even as they would de- ceive the people of Columbia ; for their promises are as the idle wind that passeth by, which no man re- 2ardeth.

3 And ; when he had gotten the silver into his owo


20 LATE

hands he departed to the land of the Gauls, where he re* maineth even until this day.

9 Nevertheless, the people profitted much thereby j inasmuch as it put them upon the watch, and they guard- ed themselves against the evil accordingly.

10 He that longeth after the interpretation of the deeds of Henry, let him make inquiry of those wh» acted with him — the ministers of the Hartford Con- vention.

11 Now, there was a certain hypocrite, whose name was Elijah, and lie was a false prophet in the east, and he led astray those of little understanding ; more- over, he was an hireling, and preached for the sake of filthy lucre.

12 And he rose up and called himself a preacher of the gospel, and his words were smooth, and the people marvelled at him ;

1 3 But he profaned the temple of the Lord, and he strove to lead his disciples into the wrong way.

14 And many wise men turned their backs against him ; nevertheless, he repented not of his sins unto this day.

15 Neither did the people, as Darius the Mede did unto the prophet Daniel, cast him into the den of lions, that they might see whether the royal beast woald dis- dain to devour him.

16 But they were rejoiced that power was not given unto him to command fire to come down from heaven tc consume the friends of the great Sanhedrim.


WAR. 2i

CHAP. V.

American Army — Militia — Navy — British, Navy— Rodgcrs* first Cndsc — Capture of the U. S. bri^ Nautilus — removal of aliens beyond tide-icater,


HE whole host of. the people of Columbia, who 4 bad been trained to war, being numbered, wasaboui seven thousand fighting men.*

2 Neither were they assembled together ; but they were extended from the north to the south, about three; thousand miles.f

3 But the husbandmen, who lived under tlieir own fig-trees, and lifted the arm in defence of their own homes, were more than seven hundred thousand^ ali mighty men of valor.

4 Now the armies of the king of Britain, are tliey not numbered and written in the book of Hume, the seribe ? is not their name a terror to all nations ?

5 Moreover, the number of the strong ships of the peaceable inhabitants of Columbia, that moved on the waters of the deep, carrying therein the destroying en- gines, which vomited their thunders, was about one score : besides a handful of " cock-boats ;" with " a bit of striped banting at their mast-head.

6 But the number of the fighting vessels of Britain was about one thousand one score and one, which bore the royal cross.

  • Standing army,

t From District of Maine to Mobile Bay and New* Orleans. C


m LATE

7 And the men of war of Britain were arrayed ia % their might against the people of the land of Columbia.

8 Nevertheless, it came to pass, that about this time a strong ship of the United States, called ike President, commanded by a skilful man whose name was Rodgers,

9 Sailed towards the island of Britain, and went nigh unto it, and captured numbers of the vessels of the people of Britain, in their own waters ; after which she returned in safety to the land of Columbia.

10 And the people gave much praise to Rodgers, for it was a cunning thing ; inasmuch as he saved many ships that were riehly laden, so that they fell not into the kands of the people, of Britain.

11 Moreover, it happened about the fifteenth day of the seventh month, in the same year in which the decree of the great Sanhedrim was issued, that a certain vessei of the states of Columbia was environed round about by a multitude of the ships of the king. ;

12 And the captain thereof was straitened, and he looked around him and strove to escape :

13 But he was entrapped and fell a prey to the vessels" of the king; howbeit, the captain, whose name was Crane, tarnished not his honor thereby.

14 And the name of tha vessel of the United States was called Nautilus.

15 Now, about this time, there was a law sent forth from the great Sanhedrim, commanding all servants and subjects of the king of Britain forthwith to depart be- yond the swellings of the waters of the great deep ; eveu two score miles.

16 And they did so ; and their friends from whom they were compelled to flee, mourned for them many days.


WAR.


CHAP VI


HutPs expedition — he enters Canada, and encamps at Sandwich — issues his Proclamation — retreats to Detroit,


N.


OW it was known throughout tl:e land Gf Columbia that war was declarer! agaiiibt the kingdom cf Briu.h.. 2 And to a certain chief captain culLd $?&&&}, whose sir-name was Hull, was given in trust a band of more than two thousand chosen men, to go forth to bat* tie in the north.

' 3 Now Hull was a man well stricken in years, and h* had been a captain in the host of Columbia, in the days that tried men's souls ; even in the days of Washington.

4 Therefore, when he appeared in the presence of the great Sanhedrim, they were pleased with his counte- nance, and put mach faith in. him.*

5 Moreover, he was a governor in the north,f and a man of great wealth.

C And when he arrived with his army hard by tlse ■•Miami of the Lakes, he gat him a vessel and placed therein those things which were appertaining unto the preservation of the lives of the sick aud the maimed.

7 But, in an evil hour, the vessel was ensnared, nea,r unto a strong hold,| beside a river called in the language of the Gauls, Detroit.

  • Gen. Hull had been to Washington and obtained an

appointment previous to tkt tear.

t Michigan territeri/. $ Maiden.


&4 LATE

8 And the army of Columbia suffered much thereby.

9 Nevertheless, on the twelfth of the seventh month about the fourth watch of the night, William with his whole host crossed the river which is called Detroit.

10 And he encamped his men round about the town of Sandwich in the province of the king.

11 From this place, he seiit forth a proclamation, which the great Sanhedrim had prepared for him ; and the wisdom thereof appeareth even unto this day.

12 But if a man's ass falleth into a ditch, shall the master suffer thereby ? if injury can be prevented, shall we not rather with tnir might en^eaveur to help him ?

13 Now in the proclamation which Hull published abroad, he invited the people of the province of Canada to join themselves to the host of Columbia, who were come to drive the servants of the king from their borders.

14 And it came to pass, that a great multitude flock- ed to the banners of the great Sanhedrim.

15 Nevertheless, they knew not that they were to be •entrapt.

16 However, it was so, that William departed from the province of the king, and re-crossed the river.

17 And when the husbandmen of the province of Canada, who had joined the standard of Columbia, learn- ed those things, they wept bitterly ; for they were left behind.

1 S After this William Secured himself in the strong nold of Detroit ; and the eyes of the men and the wo- men of Columbia were fixed upon him.

19 And the expectation thereof may be likened unto a man who hath watered well his 'vineyard.


WAR. 25


CHAP. VII.

HulVs expedition — surrender of his army and the whole Michigan Territory — his trial and pardon by the President — capture of MichilimachmmcJc.


OW the host of tfei king were few in numbers^ nevertheless, they came in battle array against the strong hold of William.

2 And when he beheld them 'from afar, he was afraid ; his knees smote one against another, and his heart sunk within him ; for, lo ! the savages of the wilderness ap- peared amongst them.

3 And there was a rumor went throughout the camp •ef Columbia, and it bore hard upon William.

4 Inasmuch as they said the wickedness of his heart Was bent on giving up the strong hold to the servants of the king.

5 Howbeit he was not taxed with drinking of the strong waters of Jamaica ; which, when they enter into the head of a man, destroy his reason and make him ap«  pear like unto one who hath lost his senses.

6 And when the" charge against William was made known unto the soldiers of Columbia, they were grieved much, for they were brave men, and feared nought.

7 So the officers communed one with another touch- ing the thing ; but they wist not what to do.

8 And they fain would have done violence unto Wil- liam, tliat they might have been enabled to pour forth their thunders against the approaching host of Britain • which he had forbidden to be done.

c2


& LAf£

9 Moreover, the names of these valiant men, who were compelled to weep before the cowardice of William, are they not recorded in the bosom of every friend of Co- lumbian liberty.*

10 And it was about the sixteenth of the eighth month when the servants of the king appeared before the strong hold of Detroit.

1 1 And the name of the chief captain of the province of Canada, that came agsinst the strong hold, was Brock, whose whole force was about seven hundred sol- diers of the king, and as many savages.

12 Now when the soldiers of Canada were distant about" a ' furlong, moving towards the stronghold; even when the destroying engines were ready to utter their thunders and smite them to the earth ;

13 William, whose heart failed him, commanded the Valiant men of Columbia to bow down before the ser- vants of the r king.

14 And he ordered them to yield up the destructive weapons which they held in their hands.

""15 Neither could they appear in battle against the kihg again for many days.

16 Moreover, the cowardice of his heart caused him to make a league with the -servants of the king, in the which he gave unto them the whole territory over which the people had entrusted him to preside ; notwithstand- ing it appertained not uflto him.

17 And the balls of solid iron, and the black dust,and the destroying engines became a prey unto the men of Britain.

1 8 Now there had followed after William a band of brave men from the west, and the name of their captain

  • Miller, Cass, M Arthur, Brush, Findley, #c


v, 'is Brush; and he had intrust "the bread and the wine which were to refresh the army of Columbia.

1 9 And, lest they should fall into the hands of the savages, a captain, whose name was Vanhorn, was or- dered to go forth and meet him.

20 And the band that went forth, were entrapped at Erownstown, by the cunning savages, that laid wait for them ; and the killed and the wounded of Columbia, were about two score.

21 And again there were sent from the camp of Wil- liam more than five hunched men to go to the aid of Brush.

22 And the name of the chief captain thereof, was Miller ; and the captain whom he ordered to go before him was ceiled Snelling.*

23 Now Snelling was a valiant man, and strove hard against the men of Britain, and the savages 3 even until Miller the chief captain arrived.

24 And the place which is called Maguago, lieth about an hunched furlongs from Detroit.

25 Now the battle waxed hot ; and the host of Miller pressed hard upon the savages and upon the men of Britain.

26 Inasmuch as they were compelled to flee before the arms of Columbia : and Miller gat great honor thereby.

27 And there fell of the men of Britain that day an -hundred two score and ten.

28 Nevertheless, in the league which William had made, he had included Miller, and all the brave captains and he men of war of Columbia that were nigh the place.

29 Now, therefore, whether it was cowardice out-

  • Coh Miller and Col. Snelling.


^28 LATE

right, in William, or whether he became treacherous for filthy lucre's sake, appeareth not unto the scribe.*

30 But the effect thereof to the nation, was as a man having a millstone cast about his neck.

3.1 So William and his whole army fell into the hands

  • of the servants of the king.

'32 But, as it is written in the book of Solomon, There is a time for all things ; so it came to pass, afterward^ -that William was called to account for his evil deeds.

33 And he was examined before the lawful tribunal of -Ms country; and they were all valiant warriors and

chief captains in the land of Columbia.

34 Howbeit, when the council! had weighed well the matter, they declared him guilty of treason, and that he should suffer death.

35 Nevertheless'^ they recommended him to the mercy of James, the chief governor of the land of Columbia,

36 Saying, Lo! the wickedness of the man appeareth anto us as palpable as the noon day ;

  • 'To palliate Hull's conduct, it hag been urged that

he surrendered his -army to prevent the effusion of blood: "but let us ask those charitable "p^.lliators what they would have said of Gen. Jackson, if, ichen a mighty and a blood-tlursty enemy appeared before his battlements, in quest of beauty and booty, he had given, up N. Orleans and ceded the Louisiana territori/ to him ? or of the gallant Croghan, when left to defend fort Stephenson with a handful of men and a single six pounder? — These palliators might even have wished that the heroes of Erie and Champlain had felt the same qualms of conscience : — but they ought to know that it was such noble deeds that stopt the " effusion cf blood."

f Coupt-Martial.


WAR. 29

37 But the infirmities of his age have weakened his -understanding ; therefore let his grey hairs go down to the grave in silence.

38 And when James heard the words of the council, his heart melted as wax before the fire.

39 And he said, Lo ! ye have done that which seem- eih right unto me.

40 And although, as my soul hopeth for mercy, for this thing William shall not surely die ; yet his name shall be blotted out from the list of the brave.

41 Notwithstanding this, William thanked him not, but Sdded insult to cowardice.*

42 So William was orderded to depart to the land which lieth in the east,t where he remaineth unto this day : and his name shall be no more spoken rf with re- verence amongst men.

43 Moreover, there was another evil which fell upon the people of the United States, about the time the host of Columbia crossed the river Detroit.

44 For, lo ! the strong hold 'of Michilimackinack, which lieth nigh unto the lakes of Michigan and Huron, fell an easy prey unto the men of Britain and their red brethren ;

45 Whose numbers were more than four-fold greater than the men of Columbia, who knew not of the war.

46 Nevertheless, the people of the United States, pveR the great Sanhedrim, were not disheartened ; nei- ther were they afraid : for they had counted the cost, and w T ere prepared to meet the evil.


  • HulVs address to the public, t Massachusetts,


LATE


CHAP. VIII.


Capture of the British frigate Guerriere., by the United State's frigate Constitution, captain Hull — capture cf the Alert sloop of war, by the Essex, captain Porter.


N<


OW it came to pass, on the nineteenth day of the eighth month, that one of the tall ships of Columbia, called the Constitution, commanded by Isaac, whose sir- name vv.as Hull,

2 Havre g spread her white wings on the bosom of the mighty deep, beheld from afar one of the fighting ships of Britain bearing the royal cross.

3 And the name of the ship was called, in the lan- guage of the French, Guerriere,* which signifieth a war- rior, and Dacres was the captain thereof.

4 Now when Dacres beheld the ship of Columbia his eyes sparkled with joy, for he had defied the vessels ©f Columbia.

5 And he spake unto his officers and his men that were under him, saying,

6 Let every man be at his post, and ere the glass hath passed the third part of an hour the stripes of the Con- stitution shall cease to sweep the air of heaven,

7 And the yawning deep shall open its mouth to re- ceive the enemies of the king.


  • The Guerriere was taken from the French by the

British.


WAR. 32

3" And the men of. Dacres shouted aloud, and drank of the strong waters of Jamaica, which make men mad j moreover, they mixed the black dust therewith.

9 Now when Isaac drew nigh unto the king's ship, the warriors of Columbia shouted.

10 And Isaac bore down upon the strong ship of the king.

11 About this time they put the lighted match to the-, black dust of the destroying engines, and it was like unto a clap of thunder.

12 Moreover, the fire and smoke issued out of the mouths of the engines in abundance, so as to darken the air, and they were overshadowed by the means there- of.

13 Now the black dust was not known among the an.- •cients ; even Solomon, in the plenitude of his wisdom j knew it not.

14 And the battle continued with tremendous roar for about the space of half an hour, when its noises ceased.

15 But when the clouds of smoke had passed away, behold ! the mighty Guerriere lay a sinking wreck upon the face of the waters.

16 The shadow of hope passed over her as a dream ; and most reluctantly was she compelled to strike the Eon's red cross to the Eagle of Columbia :

17 Whilst the Constitution, like Shadrach in the fiery furnace, remaining unsinged, filled her white sails, and passed along as though nothing had happened unto her.

18 Now the slain and the maimed of the king that daj were five score and five.


92 LATE

19 And the loss of the people of Columbia, was se- ven slain and seven wounded.

20 After this Isaac caused a burning coal to be placed in the Guerriere, that she might be consumed, and the flames thereof mounted towards the heavens.

21 And the great Sanhedrim honored Isaac with great honor, and the people were rejoiced in him, and they forgat, in the contemplation of his glory, the evils which had befallen them in the north.

22 But when the lords and counsellors of Britain heard those things, they believed them not ; it was as the bitterness of gall to their souls : for the pride of Britain was, fixed upon her navy ; it was the apple of hei eye.

23 Now, as one evil folio weth after another to the sons of men, so it happened that, in the same month, a certain strong ship of the United States, even the Es- sex, the name of the captain whereof was Porter, sailed \n search of the vessels of the king, on the waters of the ocean.

24 And in process of time, she fell upon one of the ships of Britain, called the Alert, and made spoil thereof to the people of Columbia.


WAR. 53


CHAP. IX.


Attack on Saclcefs Harbour — affair of Ogdensburgh — British drove from St. Regis, by the Troy militia under major Young — the brigs Adams and Caledo- nia re-captured by capt. Elliot, near fort Erie.


1


OYV the movements of the enemy were as the motion of a whirlwind, which passeth from the north to the south, and from the east to the west.

2 And they sought to encompass the whole land of Columbia round about.

3 So it came to pass, that a number of the armed ves- sel of the king, that sailed on the great lake which is called Ontario, moved towards Sachet's Harbour.

4 And they demanded certain vessels of the people of the United States, which they had taken from the king, to be given up unto them, saying,

5 Verily, if ye give them not up, then will we lay a contribution upon you, and ye shall pay tribute.

6 But Bellinger, the ehief captain of the Harbour, refused.

7 And whea the vessels of the king were hard by, a certain captain, whose name was Woolsey, set one of the engines to work.

8 And the vessels of the king also opened the mouths pf their engines, and shot into the camp of Columbia.

9 And the number of the husbandmen of the United

D


34 LATE

States that flocked to the defence of the Harbour was about three thousand.

10 And when the men of war of Britain saw that the people of Columbia were not afraid, and that they knew to use the destroying engines, they fled to their strong hold, in the province of the king, which is called Kings- ton.

11 Howbeit, some of their ships received much dam- age from the balls of heavy metal, that smote them from the strong hold.

12 Now as the malice of the nations increased one against another, so did the evils increase which surround- ed them.

13 And it came to pass, on the fourth day of the tenth month, there came a thousand fighting men of Britain to lay waste the village of Ogdensburgh, which lieth hard by the river St. Lawrence.

14 Howbeit, the people of Columbia permitted them not to come unto the land ; but compelled them to depart in haste.

15 Nigh unto this pkce is a village which is called St. Regis, where the soldiers of Britain had come to fix a strong hold on the borders of Columbia.

16 But a brave captain, whose name was Young, with a band of men, called militia, went against them.

17 And he set the destroying engines to work, and the noise thereof sounded in their ears j so they were discom- £tted and fled in confusion.

18 And the number of the servants of the king, made captive that day, was two score men, with the in- struments of destruction in their hands.

19 Moreover, one of the banners of the king, even


WAR. 35

the red-cross standard of Britain, fell into the hands of Young.

20 On the eighth day of the same month, a captain of Columbia, whose name was Elliot, a cunning man, took a chosen band, who came from the sea-coast, and put them in boats.

21 And he departed with them from Niagara towards the strong hold of Erie, even in the dead of the night.

22 And he cams unawarc3 upon the two vessels which were covenanted to the king, with the army At Detroit.

23 And the names of the vessels were the Adams and the Caledonia, and Elliot captured them the same night.

24 However, the next day, as Elliot and his men were returning with their prizes, the men of Britain, who were upon the other shore, let the destroying engines loose upon them from their strong hold ;

25 And a few of the people of Columbia were slain. It was here the valiant Cuyler* fell ; a ball of heavy metal struck him as he was coming oa a fleet horse to- wards the water's edge.

26 Now, Cuyler was a man well beloved ; and the officers and men of Columbia grieved for him many days.


  • Major Cuyler of N. Jersey,


36 LATE


CHAP. X.

Battle of Queenstown — the British General Brock killed.


A:


-ND it came to pass, on the morning of the thir- teenth day of the tenth month,

2 That Stephen, a chief captain of Columbia, sir- named Van Rensselaer, essayed to cross the river which is called Niagara, with his whole army.

3 Now the river lieth between the Lake Erie and the Lake Ontario.

4 And the noise of the waters of the river is louder than the roaring of the forest ; yea, it is like unto the rushing of mighty armies to battle.

5 And the movement of the stupendous falls there- of bringetli the people from all parts of the earth to be- hold it.*

6 So Stephen gat his soldiers into the boats that were prepared for them, and they moved upon the rough waters of the river, towards the strong hold of Queens- town.

7 And when the men of Britain saw them approach, they opened the engines upon them, from Fort George, and round about.

8 Nevertheless, they persevered ; although the strength ©f the waters, which were ungovernable, separated the army.

9 However, Solomon,t a captain and a kinsman of

  • Niagara Falls, i Col. Solomon Fan Rensselaer.


WAR. 37

Stephen, reached the shore with the men under his coin > mand, in all about two hundred.

10 And he put the army in battle array, in a valley, and moved up towards the strong hold ; and Brock was the chief captain of the host of Britain.

11 And from their strong hold they shot, with their mischievous engines, balls of lead in abundance ; and it was as a shower of hail upon the people of Columbia ;

12 For there was no turning to the right hand nor to the left for safety.

13 And Solomon and his men fought hard; and they rushed into the hottest of the battle.

14 And a captain of the United States, whose name was Chrystie, followed close after them, with a chosen band of brave men.

15 So they pushed forward to the strong hold, and drove the men of Britain before them like sheep, and smote them hip and thigh with great slaughter ; and Brock, their chief captain, was among the slain.

lG And Chrystie, and the valiant Wool, and Ogil- vie, and the host of Columbia, got into the hold, and the army of the king fled : and Chrystie was wounded in the palm of his hand.

17 But Solomon was sorely wounded, so that his strength failed him, and he went not into the hold.

1 S And that day there fell of the servants of the king many valiant men, even those who were called Invinci- bles, and had gained great honour in Egypt.

1-9 Nevertheless, the same day a mighty host of sava- ges and soldiers of the king,* came forth again to battle,

  • Reinforcernentsfrom Fo?-t George and Chippmva,

v 2


38 LATE

and rushed upon the people of the United States, and drove them from the strong hold of Queenstown.

20 For, lo ! Stephen, the chief captain, could not pre- vail on the hosts of militia on the othe* side of the river to cross over.

21 So the army of Columbia moved down towards the river to cross over again, that they might escape.

22 But when they came down to the water side, lo ! they were deceived, for there was not a boat to convey them to a place of safety j so they became captives to the men of Britain.

23 Now the men of Britain treated the prisoners kindly, and showed much tenderness towards them ; for which the people blessed them.

24 And the killed and wounded of the host of Colum- bia, were an hundred two score and ten.

25 And the prisoners that fell into the hands of the king, were about seven hundred.

26 Nevertheless, in a letter which Stephen sent to Henry,* the chief captain of the army of the north, he gave great honor unto the captains who fought under him that day.

27 And the names of the valiant men, who distin- guished themselves in the battle, were Wadsworth, Van Rensselaer, Scott, Chrystie, Fenwick, Fink, Gibson, and many other brave men of war.


  • Major Gen. Dearborn.


W.AR. 39


CHAP- XI.

Gen. Smyth, succeeds Gen. Van Rensselaer — his attempt to cross the Niagara, andjailure — causes.


A,


-FTER these things, on the same day in which the letter was written, Stephen resigned the command of his army to a certain chief captain whose name was Alexander,

2 Now Alexander was a man well skilled in the arts of warfare.

3 And he made a proclamation to the young men of the state of New York, wherein he invited them to go forth from their homes and join the host under him.

4 And the words thereof pleased the young men so that they went in numbers and joined Alexander, on the shores of the river which is called Niagara.

5 But here the hand of the scribe trembleth, his tongue faltcreth, his heart sickeneth, and he would fain blot from his memory that which truth compels him to record j for he is a living witness thereof.

6 Alas ! there was an evil spirit moving in secret and In bye-places throughout the land of Columbia.

7 And lo ! its viper-like insidious ness crept into the ears of the unwary husbandmen.

8 For the sect of the tories whispered unto them, say- ing, Lo! the laws of the land cannot compel you to step over the borders the United States.

  • Brig. Gen. Smyths


40 LATE

9 Moreover, said they, the fierceness of the savages is terrible as the wild tyger, and their numbers as the trees of the forest.

10 And the veteran soldiers of the king, who have been bred to war, are spread in multitudes over the pro- vince of Canada.

11 Therefore, if ye go over to fight against them, \e will be as sheep going to the slaughter ; and ye shall never again return to the house of your fathers, for ye will be destroyed.

12 Even as the wickedness of the war, which the great Sanhedrim have made against the king cannot prosper, so shall ye fall a prey to the folly thereof.

13 And it came to pass when the husbandmen heard these smooth words, many of them were bewildered in their minds, and knew not what to do.

14 So when the young men, who had flocked to the banners of Alexander, came down to the waters edge, to go into the boats, they thought of the words which the enemies of Columbia had spoken unto them ; and they refused to cross over :

1 5 Neither could the persuasions of the chief captain prevail on them all to go into the boats ; and those whose hearts were willing were not enough.

16 So he was obliged to suffer them to return to their homes ; for his expectations were blasted.

17 And the army of Columbia went into winter quarters ; for the earth was covered with snow, and the waters of the great lakes, on the borders of which they had pitched their tents, were congealed.


WAR. ?l


CHAP. XII.


Capture of the British sloop cf war Frolic, of 22 guns, by the Uniied States' sloop of war Wasp, of 1 8 giais.


JN"<


OW the strong ships of war of the kingdom of Great Britain were spread over the whole face of the •waters of the ocean.

2 But kw, indeed, Were the vessels ef Columbia that were fighting ships, and carried the destroying engines.

3 Howsoever, early in the morning of the eighteenth day of the tenth month, about the sixth hour, being on the sabbath day,

4 One of the ships of Columbia, called the Wasp, the name of the captain whereof was Jones, a valiant man, discovered afar off one of the strong ships of the king.

5 Now the ship of Britain was mightier than the ship of Columbia j and she was called the Frolic, and the captain's name was Whinyeates.

6 And they began to utter their thunders about the eleventh hour of the day, and the noises continued for more than the space of half an hour ;

7 When the Wasp, falling upon the Frolic, and get- ting entangled therewith, the men struggled together ;


42 LATE

and the mariners of Columbia overpowered the mari- ners of Britain.

8 So it came to pass, that the Frolic became captive to the ship of Columbia.

9 And the slain and the wounded of the king's shij were about four score.

10 And the children of Columbia lost, in all, abou half a score : howbeit, there was much damage done t( both vessels.

1 1 Nevertheless, about this time, a mighty ship o Britain, called the Poictiers, came upon the vessels which were in a defenceless situation, and took then: both, and commanded them to go to the island of th< king which is called Bermuda.

12 However, the people of Columbia were pleasec with the noble conduct of Jones, and for his valiant act! they gave him a sword of curious workmanship.

13 Moreover, while he remained at Bermuda, th< inhabitants, the servants of the king, treated him kindly and showed much respect for him and his officers tha; were made captive.


WAR, 43


CHAP. XIII.

Capture of the British frigate Macedonian, by Com, Decatur, in the frigate United States. — Brig Vixen captured by the British frigate Southampton.


N


OW it happened on the twenty-fifth day of the tenth month, in the first year of the war ; that a certain strong ship of Britain, that had prepared herself to fight a ship of Columbia, appeared upon the waters of the mighty deep.

2 And she was commanded by a valiant captain, whose name was Carden, and the name of the ship was the Macedonian.

3 And on the same day she met one of the strong ships of Columbia, the name of the captain whereof was Decatur, and the vessel was called tbe United States.

4 Now Decatur was a man who had never known fear ; and the good of his country was the pride of his heart ;

5 And when he came towards the vessel of the king, he used no entreaty with his men, for they all loved him, and the motion of his finger was as the word of his mouth.

6 So when the ships came nigh unto one another, their thunders were tremendous, and the smoke thereof was as a black cloud.

7 Nevertheless, in the space of about ninety minutes^


44 LATE

the strong ship of Britain struck her red flag to the stripes of Columbia.

8 Now the Macedonian was a new ship and she gat much damage.

9 But the United States, like the companions of Shadrach, moved unhurt upon the waters ; nay, even her wings were not singed.

10 And the slain and the wounded, of the ship of the king, were five score and four.

1 1 And there fell of the people of Columbia five who were slain outright, and there were seven maimed.

12 Moreover the ship of Britain had seven of the stolen men of Columbia therein, who were compelled to fight against their brethren j and two of them were slain in battle.

13 And when Carden came on board the ship of Columbia, he bowed his head, and offered to put his sword, of curious workmanship, into the hands of De- catur.

14 But Decatur said unto him, Nay, thou hast de- fended thy ship like a valiant man ; therefore, keep thy sword, but receive my hand.

1 5 So they sat down aud drank wine together : for ihc spirits of brave men mingle even in the time of warfare.

ifi And after they had eaten and drank, Carden open- ed his mouth, for he was troubled in his mind, and spake unto Decatur, saying :

17 IjO ! if this thing which hath happened be known unto the king, that one of the vessels of Britain hath struck her flag, and become captive to a vessel of the United States, what shall be done unto the captain


WAR. 45

thereof ? for such a thing hath not been heard of among the nations of the earth.

18 And Decatur answered, and spake unto Carden, saying, Verily thou art deceived, neither will harm hap» pen unto thee.

19 For, lo ! it came to pass, about three score days ago, that one of the strong ships of the king, thy mRstex, the name whereof was called Guerriere, fell an easy prey to one of the strong ships of Columbia j and they burnt her with fire upon the waters.

20 Now when Carden heard these words, his heart leaped with joy ; for he dreaded the frowns of the king, and he was glad that he stood not alone in the thing.

21 After this, in the eighteen hundred and thirteenth year of the christian era, on the first day of the first month of the same year, and on the sixth day of the week,

22 The ship United States, and the ship Macedonian came into the haven of New-York, having passed a cer- tain dangerous place called Hell-gate ; and there was a heavy fog that day.

23 And there were great rejoicings in the city of New- York, and throughout the land of Columbia.

24 Moreover, there was a sumptuous dinner given to Isaac, Decatur, and Jones, in honor of their valiant deeds ; and the number of the guests were about five hundred.

25 And the inhabitants of New- York made a great feast, on the ninth day of the month, for the brave mari- ners that wrought in the ship of Columbia.

26 And they became merry with the drinking of

E


46 LATE

wine ; after which they departed and went into a house of mirth and gaiety.*

27 Now, it is written in the words of Solomon, whose wisdom hath not been excelled, that, there is a time to weep, and a time to rejoice.

28 Not many days after those things, it came to pass, thai the hearts of the lords and the counsellors of Britain were rejoiced.

29 For a certain mighty ship, called the Southamp- ton, fell upon a smaller vessel of the United States,! and made capture thereof unto the king.

30 But the storm arose, and the sea beat upon the vessels, and they were cast away, and they parted asun- der, upon an island which lieth far to the south, and both vessels were lost.


  • Theatre.

t United States' brig, Vixen, 12 guns, G. W. Reed, wmmander.




WAR. 47


CUM*. XIV.

Affairs in the north — skirmishes — battle of Frencht6U'n s on the river Raisin — capture of Gen. Winchesters army — massacre of American prisoners.


OW it came to pass, that the wickedness of Brftaim had roused up the spirit of Satan in the savages of the forest, in the north and in the west.

2 And the tomahawk and the scalping knife were raised against the people of Columbia on the borders of the great lakes.

3 So the people sought after a valiant man to go against the savages and the men of Britain.

4 And they pitched upon a certain governor of one of the states in the west, whose name was Harrison,* and the great Sanhedrim made him a chief captain of the army.

5 Moreover, he was beloved by the people, and a mighty host of husbandmen were ready to follow after him.

6 And Harrison rested his army at the strong hold of Meigs, nigh the Miami Rapids, which lieth in the way journeying towards the strong hold of Maiden, which is in the province of the Icing ; whither he intended to go forth in the pleasant season of the year.


Mnj. Gen. W. H. Barrison, Governor of Ohw,


48 LATE

7 And Winchester* was another chief captain that went against the savages.

8 Now the savages had been a sore thorn in the side of the people of Columbia.

9 They had assailed the hold which is called after a chief captain, whose name was Dearborn, and their num- bers overpowered it, and they used deceit, and put to tleath the men, and the women, and the infants that were found in the hold, after they had become captives, save about half a score.

10 And their bowlings along the dark forest were more terrible than the wild wolf, and their murderous cunning more dreadful than the prowling tyger.

1 1 And the servants of the king gave them to drink of the strong waters of Jamaica, well knowing that they loved A as they did their own souls.

12 These were the allies, the messmates, the com- panions of the soldiers of Britain ! hired assassins.

13 However, about this time there were many brave captains of the people of the United States that went against them.

14 Even Russel, and Hopkins, and Tupper, and Campbell, and Williams, and others, who drove the red savages before them,

15 And burnt their villages,* and laid waste their habitations, and slew many of them ; for it is written in the holy scripture, Blood for blood !

16 Nevertheless, they treated the savage prisoners who fell into their hands kindly j neitner suffered they the people to buffet them !

17 But it came to pass, on the twenty-second (jay of

  • Brig. Ceii. Winchester.


WAR. 49

the first month, that a mighty horde of savages, and ser- vants of the king, fell upon the army of Winchester the chief captain.

IS And it was about the dawning of the day, when the destructive engines opened their fires.

19 And the place where the battle was fought was called, in the vernacular tongue, Frenchtown, which lieth on the south side of the River Raisin, nigh unto Lake Eric.

20 Now the name of the chief captain of the army of Britain was Proctor, and he proved himself a wicked man, and his name is despised even unto this day.

21 And when the battle waxed hot, and they began to rush one upon another with great violence,

22 The small band of Columbia fought desperately, and the slaughter was dreadful : and the pure snow of heaven was sprinkled and stained with the blood of men !

23 Nevertheless, the people of the United States were overcome, and their chief captain made prisoner.

24 So when Winchester found he was made captive, and that there was no hope for the rest of the men under his command, he made a league with Proctor, the chief captain of the host of the king.

25 In the which Proctor agreed to vouchsafe protec- tion to the captive men of Columbia, from the wrath of the savages, whom he had inflamed.

26 Now the number of the men of Columbia that fell into their hands that day, were about five hundred ; and the slain and wounded about an hundred two score and ten.

E 2


50 LATE

27 And the number of the savages and the men- of Britain who fell in battle that day were many.

28 And Proctor removed the captives unto the strong hold of Maiden, which lieth upon the opposite side of the river, iu the province of the king.

29 But, in the cruelty of his heart, he left the sick, the wounded, and the dying to the mercy of the savages of the wilderness !

30 In this thing he transgressed the word he had pledged, which is evil in the sight of the Lord.

3 1 Oh ! for a veil to hide in utter darkness the hor- rid deeds of that awful day, that they might not be handed down to the children of men, in the times to come.

32 Lo 1 early in the morning of the next day, -ere the sun had risen, the work of death began !

33 Behold the sullen savage, with deadly rage, drag forth the shivering soldier over the blood-stained snow fainting, bleeding with his wounds, and imploring on his knees for mercy.

34 Alas ! the savage understandeth not his words ; but giveth him a blow with the hatchet of death.

35 For have not the counsellors of Britain said, For this will we give unto you silver and gold ?

36 Thus were the poor wounded prisoners of Co- lumbia slaughtered in abundance.

37 And Round-Head, the chief captain of the war- riors, and the savages under him, gat great praise from Proctor, the chief captain of the host of Britain.*

38 Neither did the sick and wounded escape, wh»


See Proctor's account, dated Quebec, Feb. 8, 18.13.


WAR. 51

had gathered themselves together in the houses, that they might be sheltered from the piercing cold ; even those who were weary and unable to go forth.

39 For the savages put the burning brand to the houses, from which they could not flee, and burnt them to death therein.

40 And the flames and the smoke arose ; and their cries and their groans reached the high chancery of heaven,

41 Where they will stand recorded, until the coming of that day for which all other days were made.

42 Lo ! these were the helpmates of the mighty kingdom of Britain, that noble and generous nation, the bulwark of religion !

43 Tell it not in Gath ; publish it. not in the streets of Askelon.*


  • The whole, of this massacre was conducted under the

eyes of the British officers, and sanctioned by them as well as by their government ; this fact has never been disavowed.


LATE


CHAP. XV.

Capture of the British frigate Java, by the United States frigate Constitution.


N the twelfth month of the first year of the decree ©f the great Sanhedrim, on the twenty and ninth day of the month,

2 It came to pass, that one of the strong ships of the king had approached the country of the south, which iieth many thousand miles off.

3 And the ship was called Java, after one of the sweet scented islands of the east ; where the poppy flourishes, where the heat of the sun is abundant, and where the Bohon Upas emits its deadly poison.

4 Moreover, she carried about four hundred and fifty men, and a governor,* and many officers and soldiers of the king ; and she was well prepared for battle.

5 And Lambert commanded the ship of Britain, and he was a brave and valiant man.

6 So, as he passed along, nigh unto the coast of Brazil, •where the sun casteth the shadow of a man to the south at noon day :

7 (A place unknown to the children of Israel, in the -days of Moses)

8 Lo ! one of the tall ships of Columbia, even the Constitution, beheld her when she was yet a great

  • Gov, H.yslop } and mite i bound to Bombay.


WAR. 53

way off, and made signs unto her which she answered not ;

9 Which caused the gallant captain, whose sir-name was Cambridge,* to cast a shot towards her, after which she received the thunder of his destroying en- gines.

10 And it was about the second hour after the mid- day, when the sound of the battle-drum was heard.

1 1 And, as they approached towards each other, the people shouted aloud, and the roaring of the engines was dreadful.

12 And the servants of the king fought bravely ; and they held out to the last.

13 For they were ashamed to let the nations of the earth say unto them,

14 Lo ! ye, who are the lords and the masters of the mighty deep, have suffered these feeble Yankees to con- quer you.

15 Therefore, the slaughter was dreadful, be3>-ond measure.

16 And the black clouds of smoke arose, and ob- scured the rays of the sun, so that they fought in the shade.

17 And the winds moved the vessels about, and they strove to avoid the balls of lead, and the heavy balls of iron, that whistled about them in multitudes.

1 o (Now these balls, which were gathered from the bowels of the earth, were an invention unknown to the Philistines ; even Sampson was a stranger to them.)

  • Com. Bainlridge.


54 LATE

19 However, the ships fought hard, for the space of about two hours, when their thunders ceased.

20 And the ship of Britain had become a wreck, and the deck thereof was covered with blood !

21 Nevertheless, the servants of the king struck not the flag of Britain ; for they were loth and hesitated :

22 But when Bainbridge, who saw this, came down upon them a second time, they humbled themselves, and drew down the British cross.

23 And the slain and the wounded of the king, that day, were an hundred three score and ten ;

24 And those of the people of Columbia, were about thirty and four.

25 Moreover, Bainbridge, the captain of the vessel of the United States, was sorely wounded.

26 And Lambert, the captain of the ship of the king, was wounded, even unto death.

27 Now when the servants of the king were taken from the wreck, and meat and drink sat before them, that they might be refreshed, they partook thereof and were thankful.

23 And on the second day Bainbridge put a match to the black dust that remained in the ship, and she burst asunder, and rent the air with a loud noise.

29 And the fragments thereof were spread upon the waters round about.

30 And the fish of the sea, even the mighty whales, fled from the noise of the explosion.

31 However, the Constitution escaped not unhurt, for she was much wounded in her tackling.

32 So, when Bainbridge came into the haven of St. Salvador, which iieth farther to the south, he gave the


WAR. 5f>

men of Britain, whom he had made captive, liberty to go home to the king, their master.

33 But when the tidings thereof reaehed the palace of the king, the lords and the princes and the rulers of Britain were confounded.

34 Their spirits sunk within them : astonishment seized the tyrants of the ocean.

35 The smile of joy i pa t-\l from their counte- nances, and the uloom of despair holered around them.

36 The wiss men and the orators were mute ; they gaped on- upon an • and wist not what to say.

37 But the people of Columbia, from the north to the south, were gladdened ; and bestowed great honor and praise on Bainbridge the captain.

3« Eten the great Sanhedrim of the people rejoiced with great joy.


5* LATE


CHAP. XVI.


Com. Rodgers return from a second cruise — capture of the V. States brig Viper — the General Armstrong and a Britishfrigate — privateering,


OW it came to pass, in the begianing of the one thousand eight hundred and thirteenth year of the Great Founder of the Christian sect,

2 That a strong ship of the United States, called the President, commanded by Rodgers, returned a se- cond time to the land of Columbia.

3 And while she was upon the waters of the great deep, she fell in with one of the packets of the king called after the swift %ing bird* of the air, and made capture thereof.

4 And in the ship Rodgers found abundance of wealthy even an hundred, sixty and eight thousand pieces of silver.

5 And it was carried, with many horses, to a place ©f safe-keeping,t in the town of Boston, which lieth to the east.

6 Moreover, he made capture of another ship of the king,! laden with oil and bones of the great fish of the deep.

7 Now it happened, on the seventeenth day of the first month of the same year,

• Swallow, f Bank of Boston. \ Ship Arga,


WAR. 37

i

8 That one of the weak vessels of the United States**

Hecame a prey to one of the strong ships of the kingy, called the Narcissus : albeit, she fought not.

9 About this time the great waters of the Chesa- peake, which empty into the sea, were guarded by the strong chips of the king, so that the vessels might not ar-* - rive or depart therefrom.

10 But the vessels of the United States, and the private vessels of the men of Columbia, were doing great damage unto the commerce of Britain, even in her own waters.

1 1 And the number of the private vessels, that moved' swiftly over the face of the waters, and went out to de- spoil the commerce of Britain, and to capture the mer- chant vessels thereof, was about two hundred two score and ten.

12 And they made capture of more than fifteen hun- dred of the vessels of the people of Britain. f

13 Moreover j there was a sore battle between one of the private armed vessels of the people of the United; States, and a strong ship of the king.:}:

14 The privateer was called the General Armstrong^ and the name of the captain was Guy. j j

15 Now G-iy was a valiant man, and fear was a stranger to him. .

16 And on tire eleventh day of the third month he- espied from afar a vessel which appeared as a speck upon the waters.

17" But when he bore down upon her, behold ! sh»


  • Viper, f Dui-ing the ivar. \ A British frigate^

fj Cant. Champtam. F


38 LATE '

was a fighting ship of Britain, carrying the destroying engines.

1 8 And Guy was near being entrapped, for he was ' deceived, thinking it was a merchant's vessel.

19 Therefore he was compelled to fight ; so he open- ed upon the vessel of the king, one of his mischievou* * engines called, in the vernacular tongue, Long-Tom.

20 And they fought hard, and the noise of the engines was very great.

21 And the balls of lead and iron showered around Eke hail-stones \ lor the strong ship of Britain had thenr in abundance.

22 Now the slaughter was dreadful on both sides, and Guy was on the point of making capture of the ship : but he received a wound, and his vessel was disa- ble d, so lie made good his escape.

23 And the slain and the wounded of Guy were twenty and three, and the vessel of the king lost about twice that number.

24 Now, fortius valiant act, Guy gat great honor, and (he people give him a sword of fine workmanship.

25 Moreover, the Saratoga, the Scourge, the Chas- seur, and many other private vessels of the people of the Uriied Stutes, were a grievous plague to the servants of the '.'(ig;

26 Inasmuch as some of them made sport with the' Bji -lily blockade of Britain, which she put forth against the free people of the land of Columbia.

27 For when thej came nigh unto the coast of Britain, they made ca Ui e and burnt the vessels of the king, that carried rkl ^merchandise, costly jewels, and silver and gold.

"»jj Yea, even in their own waters, and in the sight ©# tlwr own havens, did they dfr these things.


WAR. $$

•29 For it "happened that the cunning Yankees knew how to construct the swift-sailing vessels, that they out- ran the strong vessels of Britain.

SO And as the ships of Britain moved but slowly o^h the waters, so they caught them not.

31 Wherefore the artificers, the mechanics, and those who dealt in merchandise, raised their voices to the great council of Britain, saying,

32 Lo ! are we not the faithful servants of the king, our master ? have we not given unto him the one half of our whole substance ? and shall these Yankees take from us the remainder ?

33 Hath not the king a thousand ships of war ? and wherefore should we be hemmed in ?

34 Lo ! our merchant vessels are idle! neither ca» we pass in safety even unto the land of Hibernia, which lieth nigh unto us.

35 And, behold, the captain of a private armed ves- sel of the Yankees, in derision of the proclamat on of our lord the king, hath proclaimed the island of Great Britain and her dependencies in a state of rigouroius blockade ; saying, Lo ! I have the power to hem ye in,

3<5 Therefore, let the counsellors of the king ponder these things, and let the strong ships of Britain drive the vessels of Columbia from our coast.

37 "Now the wisemen of Britain heard those things with sorrow ; and they spake one to another concerning the matter :

38 But they wist not what to do ; for the cunning of gl e • aptains of the fast sailing vessels of Columbia, sur ? passed the wisdom of the lords of Britain.


$0 LATE

CHAP. XVH.

'Capture and hunting of Ogdensburgh by the BritisTt.


XN these days the war against Columbia was waged -with great violence,

2 And the fur-clad savages prowled in secret places and fell upon the helpless.

2 ' They hid themselves in the wilderness ; they couched down as a lion; and, as a young lion, they watched for their prey.'

4 The tall and leafless trees of the forest bent to the -Strong winds of the north ; and the sound thereof was -%as the roaring of mighty waters.

5 Moreover, the face of the earth was covered with s&nov and the water of the rivers was frowst.

6 And the borders of Columbia, nigh unto the pro- " vince of the king, were ex. osed to the transgressions of ~the enemy.

7 And the soldiers of the king came in abundance from the island of Britain, and pitched their tents in the Canadian provinces.

8 Accordingly, it came to pass, on the twenty-second day of the second month, being the birth-day of Wash- ington, the deliverer,

9 That a mighty host came out of the province of the king, and went against* the town of Ogdensburgh,

• sand made capture thereof.


WAR. 61

.10 And there were five slain and ten wounded of the people of Columbia, and about three score were taken by the servants of the king.

11 Moreover, the men of Britain gat much spoil; §ven a large quantity of the black dust fell into their hands ;

12 And twelve of the destroying engines, which the people of Columbia had taken from the king about forty years before.

13 Also, three hundred tents, and more than a thou- sand, weapons of war; but the vessels and the boats they consumed with fire.

14 Now Ogdensburgh was a beautiful village to be- hold ; nevertheless they burned it with fire, and it be- came a heap of ruins.

15 And the women and the children looked for their homes, but found them not ; and they sat down in sor- row, for the haughty conquerors laughed at their suffer- ings.

16 After which they returned with their spoil to Prescott, from whence the}" came, being on the other side of the water, in the province of the king.

17 And t!;e honor that was given to the servants of Britain that day was as a thimble full of water spilt into tiie sea : for they were like unto a giant going cut against a bulrush.


S2 LATE


6HAP. XVIII.


Uttpturt of the Peacock, of 18 guns, by the V. S> sloop of war Hornet, of £6 gitis — return of the Chesapeake from a cruise.


T


HE deeds of the renowned warriors, the patriots, and the valiant men of Columbia, have prepared a path for the scribe, which he is compelled to follow :

2 But, as the soaring eagle moves to its craggy nest, or the cooing dove to its tender mate, so is the compulsion of his heart.

3 If the wickedness of Britain hath made manifest her folly : if her sons have sat down in sackcloth and ashes, the scribe looketh down upon her with pity.

4 It is written that, He who prideth himself in his strength shall be humbled j and the haughty shall be brought low.

5 And, if the Lord hath smiled upofc the arms of Columbia, let no man frown.

6 Now it came to pass, in the eighteen hundred and thirteenth year of the christian era, on the twenty-fourth day of the second month,

7 That one of the righting vessels of Columbia, called the Hornet, which signifieth, in the vernacular tongue^ a fly whose sting is poison,

8 Moved upon the waters of the great deep, far to «»he south, aear 4mto a place whkh is called Denaaxara.


WAR. - 68

9 Moreover, the captain of the Hornet " T as a valiant man. and lus same was Lawrence.

10 Aad it was towards the setting of the sun, whe* -he came njgfej unto one of tte strong ships of the kitg^

called the Peacock, alter, the bird- whose feathers .are beautiful to beheld ;

11 And the captain thereof was sir-named Peake.

12 Now began the roaring noises of the engines of destruction, that opened their mouths against one an- other; and dreadful was the slaughter of that day.

13 Nevertheless, iu the space of about the fourth part of an hour, the vessel ©f the king was captured by

• the people of Columbia.

14 And. they found therein some of the mariners of the United States, who had begged that they might go down into the hold of the ship, a&d not raise their hands against the blood of their own brethren :

15 But Peake, the commander, suffered them not, but compelled them to fight against their own kinsmen : and one of them was slain in battle.

16 And the killed and maimed of the people of Bri^ tain, were about two score and two : and Peake the cap-

  • taifl, was also slain : and the loss of Columbia was about

five souls !

17 Moreover, the Peacock sunk down into the yawn- ing deep, before they could get all the men of Britain out of her ; and three of the people of Columbia were bu- ried with her, whilst in the humane act of endeavouring to preserve the lives of the enemy,

18 Now this was the fifth fighting vessel of the king . which had been hu»ibled, since the decree of the great v Sanhedrim, before the destroyiug engines of the people

of Columbia.


&l LATE

19 And Lawrence, and the brave men that fought with him, had honor and praise poured out upon them abundantly.

20 Moreover, the people of New- York gave unt*> Lawrence vessels of silver, with curious devices ; and they made a feast for the men who fought in the Hor- net.

21 And air the people were exceedingly rejoiced at the,, valiant acts of Lawrence, and his fame extended throughout the land of Columbia ; the sound of his name was the joy of every heart.

5 2 But when the news thereof reached the ears of the wise men of Britain, they said, Lo ! these men are giants; neither are they like unto the warriors of the

23 And their witchcraft and their cunning are dark- ness unto us; even as when a, man putteth a candle un- der a bushel.

24 Behold ! five times hath the l striped bunting' of Columbia, triumphed, over the royal cross of Bri- tain,

2£ ■ Now the great Sanhedrim, who were assembled together, forgat not the valiant deeds of the mariners of Columbia.

2G For they divided amongst them more than seven- ty thousand pieces o{ silver.

2" And il came to pass, on the tenth day of the fo:;rth month, in the same year, that the Chesapeake, a strong vessel of the United States, arrived in the haven of Bo ton.

28 She had. sailed upon the face df the rough wa-


WAIL <-« 

ters ra»re than an hundred days, after she departed from the land of Columbia, and passed a great way to tha south :

29 And went hard by the island of Barbadoes, and those places, in the great sea which encompasseth the world, from whence they bring poisoned waters, which open the womb of the earth to receive the unwary song of men.

30 Moreover, in returning, she came nigh unto the Capes of Virginia, where the sweet-scented plant* greweth in abundance.

31 And while she was on the>ecean she captured m .cumber of the vessels of the people of Britain, whicjn were laden with rich merchandise.


TeteccQ,


€6 LATE


CHAP. XIX.


'Capture, of little York, in Upper Canada — the destn^ , tion of the whole American army prevented by the precaution of Gen. Pike — his death.


N


OW, whilst these things happened in the south, and the evils of war destroyed the life of man, and the smiles of heaven strengthened the arms, and lifted up the glory of Columbia. ;

2 Behold, preparations of warfare were making on the borders of the great lakes of the north.

3 And the vessels of war of Columbia that were tip- on the waters of the lake called Ontario, were com- manded by a brave man, whose name was Chauncey.

4 Now on the twenty fifth day of the fourth month, the army of Columbia, who were gathered on the shore of the lake, went down into the strong vessels of Chaua- eey.

5 And the number that went into the vessels was about two thousand.

6 And Henry* and Zebulon, whose sir-name was Pike,f were the chief captains ol the host of Columbia.

7 On the same day the sails of the vessels were sprend to the winds of heaven, and they moved towards

  • Major General Dearborn, t Brig. G'en< Pike-


WAR e?-

  • place called Little York,* in the province of Canada.

8 Howbeit, the winds were adverse and blew with- great violence from the east.

9 Nevertheless, on the morning of the twenty-seventh day of the same mouth, the army of Columbia, com- manded by Pike, the chief captain, moved out of the strong ships of the United States.

10 But He ry remained on board the vessel of' Chauncey, neither came he to the water's edge.

1 1 And the place where the host of Columbia land- ed was to the west of the town, about twenty and four, furlongs, and from the strong hold of the king about tea' furlongs.

12 She gallant Forsyth, who led a bai.d of brave men, who fought not for filthy lucre's sake, went before- the host.

13 And their weapons of war were of curious work- manship, and they sent forth balls it lead ; such as w:r< unknown to Pharoah when he followed the Chil- dren of Israel down into the red sea

14 Now Zebulon, with a thousand chosen men, fol- lowed close after Forsyth, the- warrior.

15 Abouj this time the savages and the servants of the king, even a great multitude, opened their engines of destruction without mercy.

] 6 And from the forest, and the secret places, their balls were showered like unto hail-stones, and the sound' thereof was as sharp thunder.

1" .-.nil a man, whose name was Sheaffe, was the

chief captain of the host of Britain.

> _ ■ — ■/

  • Capital of U. Canada. t Rifles,


<3r EATE

1 8 Now the destroying engines of the strotog hold @f the king issued fire and smoke with a mighty noise and shot at the vessels of the United States.

19 Bmt Chauncey returned unto them four-fold ; and and the battle waxed hot, both on the land and on the water.

20 And the men of Columbia rushed forward with terseness, and drove the men of Britain from their strong hold. •

21 So they fled towards the town for safety, for they

were overcome ; and the savages were smitten with

fear, their loud yellings ceased, and their feet were light, as the wild roe ;

22 Nevertheless, the men of Columbia shouted aloud, and sounded their trumpets, their cymbals, and their noisy drums, which were contrived since the days of Jeroboam, king of Israel.

23 And Zebulon, the valiant warrior, followed hard after them ; and they found no rest ; for they were sore pushed, and the phaatora of their imaginations pictured ©at new evils.

24 So when they found they were nigh being made captive, they departed in haste from the town and from the strong hold thereof, save about two score!

25 Now when the army of Britain was overthrown ; when they were compelled to flee from the streng held p the wickedness of Satan entered into their hearts.

26 And they gathered together abundance of the black dust and fixed it in the lowermost part of the fort, below the walls of stone.

2f After which they put a lighted match nigh to it 4


WAR. 6$

so that when the whole army of Columbia got into the hold, they might be destroyed.

28 But the Lord, who is good, even he who govern^ eth the destinies of man, permitted it not.

29 Now when Zebulon and his army came out of the thick woods, in battle array, to go forth against the strong hold,

30 Lo ! they saw not the host of Britain ; but the eye of Zebulon was as the eye of an eagle, his strength as the lion, and his judgment as the wise :

31 So he stayed his men of war from rushing for- ward towards the place, lest they might be entrapped : and he caused them to move along the wood to the right hand and to the left.

32 About this time, a stripling from the south, with his weapon of war in his hand, ran up to Zebulon, and spake unto him, saying,

S3 Behold ! a man of Britain appeared) in the fort; suffer me, I pray thee, to slay him, for he is busied with the destroying engines :

34 But Zebulon said, nay ; we are yet a great wa# off.

35 And the 3*oung man entreated him a second time, saying, i beseech thee, let me step out before the host and slay him, lest the engine be let loose upon us ; thea Zebulo'i said unto him, Go.

36 So he ran out before the army and shot the maa, and he fell to the earth ; and it was about a furJone off, and the weight of the ball was about the weight ol a shekel.

37 But as the young man returned to where tfte ar- ray stayed, behold ! the black dust in the hold caught

G


fO- LATE

fire, and it rent the air with the noise of a thousand' thunders :

38 And the whole army fell down upon their faces* to the earth ; and the stones, and the fragments of rocks, were lifted high ; and the falling thereof was terrible even unto deaths

39 Yea, it was dreadful as the mighty earthquake, which ovefturneth cities.

40 vVnd the whole face of the earth round about, and the army of 2,ebulon, were overshadowed with black smoke ; so that, for a time, one man saw not another :

41 But when t s ie heavy clouds of smoke passed avray towards the west, behold the ea*ti was covered with the killed and the wounded.

42 las: the sight was shocking to behold ; as the deed was ignoble,,

43 About two hundred' men rose not : the stones had; bruised them ; the sharp rocks had fallen upon them :.

44 They were wedged into the earth : their weapons* of war were bent down into the ground with them ; their feet wereturnei towards heaven; their limbs were lopped off.

45 but when those who escaped unhurt arose and looked .iiouiv', they beheld not their chieftain; he had fanen to the earth.

40 A huge st<,ne smote him upon the back, and tvro ot tiis officers, ^or.e of whom was the gallant


  • IJotsever strange this may appear, it is a fact that

the. conevssion of the air produced that ejfett on near Uj om wuo fronted the explosion.


war. m.

Fraser,) raised hira up and led him forth from the field of murder ; the one on the one side, and the other on •the other side.

47 And as they led him away he turned his head around to his brave warriors, and said unto them, Go on ; 1 will be with you soon ! I am not slain.

43 The magic of his words gave joy to their hearts; for they loved him as they loved their own father.

49 And with resistless force his noble band rushed on, at the trumpet's sound, over the heaps of slain and wounded, to glory, and to -triumph !

50 And a swift messenger ran down unto Henry, with these words in his mouth, Lo ! the right hand of eur army is slain ! its pride is gone ! Zebulon has fal- len ?

51 Immediately Henry departed fron* the fleet, and came to the shore, and went up and led the host of Co- lumbia to the town and took it.

52 Now the slain, the maimed and the captives of the host of Britain that day, were about a thousand ■fighting men :

53 And the loss of the men of Columbia was about three hundred slain and wounded.

54 And Henry, the chief captain, gave great honor to ■the captains unxler him, ever, Riplev, Forsyth and Eus- tis, and all the brave men that fought that day.

55 Nevertheless, SheafFe, the captain of the king, escaped with a handful of men, and the swift-footed savages : leaving behind him the insignia of British mercy ! — a human scalp !


-72 LATE

56 But the rejoicings of the people were mingled with deep sorrow ; for the brave were slain in battle.

57 Oh ! earth, how long shall thy inhabitants delight in warfare ? when shall the old men cease to weep for their children ?

58 Behold yon lonely widows ; they weep for their husbands and their children ; but they shall see their faces no more !

59 The, fair daughters of Columbia sigh for the re- turn of their beloved.

60 Seest thou those little ones ? they fly to their dis- consolate mother, they leap with joy at the name of father ! but he shall never return !

61 Oh ! that they had cast the black dust into the sea! t' en might not the children of men weep and wail.

62 Now on the next day, when the army of Zebulon gat the tidings that their captain was slain, the tears started in their eyes; the}' were mute, their hearts failed them ; and they became as weak women.

63 Moreover, the United States made great lamen- tations over him ; and the remembrance of his name shall live in the hearts of the people.

64 The eagle of Columbia dropt a feather from her wing, which the angel of L* ightness caught ere it fell to the earth, ascended to heaven, and recorded the name ©f Pike.


WAR'; rs


CHAP. XX.

Sketches of the History of America.


JL HE the voice of many years shall drop upon the children of men ; and our children's children shall hear- l ten unto it in the days to come.

2 The country of Columbia is a wide extended land, which reacheth from the north to the south, more thau eight thousand miles ; and the breadth thereof is about three thousand.

S Moreover the name of the country was called aftei the name of a great man, who was born in a place called •Genoa ; being in Italia, en the sea-coast.

4 Kis name was Christopher, sir-named Columbus

5 As the righteous man struggleth against wickedness, so did he against ignorance and stupidity.

6 Nevertheless, it came to pass, hi the fourteen hun- dred and ninety second year of the Christian era, that he crossed the waters of the mighty deep, a thing that had never been known among the sons of men.

7 And the place where he landed was an island in the sea, nigh unto the continent of Columbia, called San Salvador ; which, being interpreted, signifieth a place of safety.

8 And the place was inhabited by wild savages, and they were naked.

9 Now when the people heard that Columbus had found a new land, they were astonished beyond measure,,

r- °


74 LATE

for it was many thousand miles off; moreover, some of them strove to rob him of the honour, and he was treated wrongfully.

10 But his name was lifted up above his enemies, and it shall not be lost.

1 1 Now the land of Columbia is a most plentiful land, yielding t gold and silver, and brass and iron abundantly.

12 Likewise, all manner of creatures which are used for food, and herbs and fruits of the earth :

13 From the red cherry, and the rosy peach of the north, to the lemon, and the golden orange of the south.

14 And from the small insect, that cheateth the mi- croscopic eye, to the huge mammoth that once moved on the borders of the river Hudson ; on the great river Ohio ; and even down to the country of Patagonia in the south.

15 Now the herghth of a mammoth is about seven cubits and a half, and the length" thereof fourteen cu- bits ; and the bones thereof being weighed are more than thirty thousand shekels ; and the length of the tusks is more than six cubits.

16 It is more wonderful than the elephant ; and the history thereof, is it not recorded in the book of Jeffer- son, the scribe ?'*

17 The fierce tyger and the spotted leopard dwell in the dark forests ; and the swift -footed deer upon the mountains and high places.

18' ^ow the number of inhabitants that are spread over the whole continent, is more than an hundred mil- lion.


  • Jefferson's notes on Virginia,


war. 75

.19 And the people of Columbia, who are indepen- dent of 'he tyrants of the earth, and who dwell between the great river which is called Mississippi, in the south, and the province of Canada in the north, being number- ed, are about ten thousand times ten thousand souls.*

20 The men are comely and noble, and cowardice hath forgot to light upon them : neither are they a su- perstitious people;. they are peace-makers, they love the God of Israel, and worship him ; and there are no idolaters amongst them.

2 i The women are passing beautiful ; they are like unto fresh lilies ; their cheeks are like wild roses ; their lip3 as a thread of scarlet; nature hath gifted them with Roman virtue and patriotism ; and they have spread goodness with a plentiful hand.

22 Now it had happened in times pa?t that the king of .Britain had made war upon the people of Columbia, even forty years ago.

23 For the riches and prosperity of Columbia had become great, and the king coveted them.

24 And the war raged with the might of Britain, even in the heart of the land of Columbia, for about the space of seven years, when the army of Columbia be- came triumphant ; neither could the power of Britain conquer the sons of liberty.

25 Accordingly a part of those who remained of the armies of Britain returned home to the king, their master ; but a great number refused to return, preler-

  • T last census, in 1810, stated the amount at

about 8, '00,000, the number may now probably _be in* creased to 10,000,000.


T6 LATE

-ing a country whose mild laws are equally and righteous- ly dispensed, and where the hard earnings of industry are not taken away by the tax-gatherer :

26 So there was peace throughout the United States, and a covenant made between the nations.

27 But the names of the wise men of the great San- hedrim in v those days, and the names of those who fought hard in battle, and spilt their blood in the cause of liberty, are they not written ia tne books of the chron- icles ot those days ?

28 Now the fatness of the land of Columbia bringeth people from all nations to dwell therein.

29 The people of Columbia use no persuasion, the pacred cause of Liberty is the star oe attrac- tion ; and the time shall come when the eyes of all men

sha!l be opened, and the earth shall rejoice.

SO Their laws are wholesome, for the people are the lawgivers, even as it was in the days of Cesar ; but they v&jqqw no kioes.


VVAIl. 77


chap. xxi.


f)epredatioKs hi tl>e Chesapeake — Hayre-de-Grace burnt by the British under Adm. Ccckbirn — at- tack on Cranp Island — Hampton taken by the British — outrages .


OW it came to pass, that the mighty fleet of Bri- tain, which whs moving round about the great Bay of Chesapeake, committed much .evil upon the shores thereof.

2 And they robbed those who were defenceless, and carried away their fatted cattle, their sheep, and aii those things which they found, and put them into the strong ships of the king.

3 Moreover, they burnt the dwellings of the helpless with fire, and they accounted it sport.

4 Aad the old men, the little children, and the women, yea, the fair daughters of Columbia, were compelled te fly from the wickedness of barbarians.

5 Even the small villages that rose beautifully on the river side, became a prey unto them, and were consumed by men who called themselves the mighty conquerors of Europe.

6 They werp like hungry wolves that are never satis.- ued; destruction and de/astation marked their footsteps

Y Now the ships of the king were commanded by 3 .' man whose name was Cockbnrji,


33 -LXTi;

"8 And it was so, that on the third day of the 'fifth araonth, in the thirty and seventh year of the indepen- dence of the people of Columbia,

9 Cockburn, sir-named the wicked, led forth a host -of the savage men of Britain, against a pleasant village, called IIavre-do~Grace, which lieth on the borders of .the Susquehanna, a noble river ; being in the state of Maryland.

10 Now there was none !o defend the place, save one man, whose s'r-nanie was O'Neil, who came from the land of Hibernia, and him they made captive.

1 1 And they came as the barbarians of the wilder- ness: fierceness was in their looks, cruelty was in their hearts.

12 To the dwelling houses they put the burning brand, and plundered the poor and needy without pity^ such wickedness was not done even among the Philis- tines.

13 The women and children cried aloud, and fell down at the feet of the chief captain of the king: but, alas ! his heart was like unto the heart of Pharaoh ; he heard them not.

14 However, it came to pass, the next day, when the pitiless Cockburn had collected his booty, and glutted his savage disposition, he departed.

15 And on the sixth day of the same month he went against other unprotected villages, which lie ojl the river Sassafras, called Frederickstown and George- town, and burnt them idso.

16 So did he return to his wickedness as a dog re- ! turneth to his v mit.

,17 Now about this time the number of the strong


WAR. 79

strips of TJritain was increased, and great multitudes of the soldiers of the king came with them to the waters of the Chesapeake.

18 And it came to pass, on the twenty-second day of the next month, that C'cckburn, the chief captain of the ships of Britain, essayed to go against a small island, nigh unto Norfolk in the state of Virginia, called in the rernacular tongue, Crany-Island.

19 And the number of the men of Britain that went against the island was about five thousand ; and they began to get upon the shore at the dawning of the day.

20 Near unto this place a few vessels of Columbia, commanded fry the gallant Casein, were hemmed in by afrtut a score of the mighty ahips of the king.

21 Now the fighting vessels under Cassin were mostly small, and were called gain boats, and they were little more than half a score in number.

22 Howbeit, but a few days before, they went against the Junon,* a strong ship of Britain," and compelled her to depart from before the mouths of the destroying en- gines.

23 But this island was defenceless ; and there came to protect it an hundred brave seamen from the gun- boats, and an hundred and fifty valiant men from the Constellation, a lighting ship of the United States.

24 And they brought the destroying engines with them, and they let them loose upon the vessels of the king, and upon the men who were landing upon th©


  • British Frigate, J anon,


80 LATE

25 And the thundering noise thereof astonished the servants of the king: for they knew there was but a handful of men upon the island.

26 Moreover, Britain in her folly had introduced a new instrument of destruction, called Congreve Rock- ets, in honour of their inventor; and these were used in great abundance.

T{ But they were harmless as turtle doves, for they killed not a man.

23 Now the men of Columbia, with their handicraft, shot the balls of iron strait as an arrow from a bow, and j&ereby did much damage to the servants of the king.

29 Inasmuch as the}' slew about two hundred of the men of Britain that day; and drove the host of thena from the island.

30 So the might} 7 army of Britain fled in haste to the strong ships of the king for safety.

31 Now on the twenty-fifth day of the same month the army of Britain went against a village called t lamp* ton, which lieth in the state of Virginia, and touk it.

32 Howbeit, the little band of Columbia, command- ed by Cr'utchflelJ, fought hard against them.

33 Nevertheless, they prevailed over him, and sl.'w seven of his men, aud wounded others, upon which he fled ; for the men of Britain were like unto a swarm of locusts.

34 But the blood of two hundred royal invaders be- came a sacrifice to the wickedness of their leaders.

35, Oh ! England ! that a veil might be cast over flhy transgressions of that day : but it cannot be.

36 Thy wickedness shall be written with a ppn '■'. iron, aud with the point of a diamond.


WAR. 8*

37 It was here, even in Hampton, that thy strength and thy majesty rose up against the poor, the sick, aufi the needy.

3S Instead of protecting the tender women, the fair- est work of God, the life of the world ; behold ! what hast thou done ?

39 See ! the shrieking matron cast herself into the waters that she may escape thy brutal violence : but all in vain j her garments are torn from her ; she becomes a prey to thy savage lust.

40 Not she alone, but her daughter, and her fair sis- ters, have fallen into thy unhallowed hands, and been de- filed !

41 Oh, Britain ! the voice of violated chastity riseth up against thee ; the mark of the beast is indelibly printed in thy forehead :

42 Even the old and weak men became victims of thy barbarity ; thy servants stripped the aged Hope, and buffeted him; with the point of their swords did they torment him.

43 Do the groans of the murdered Kirby creep into thine ears ? go thou and repent of thine evil, and do so no more : the Lord God of Hosts shall be thy judge j

44 The generous people of Columbia may possibly forgive thy crimes against them ; but the remembrance thereof shall live to the end of time ; neither shall th*y fcrget the name of Cockburn.


H


8t LATE

CHAP. XXII.

Russian mediation — Bayard and Gallatin sail for St. Petersburgh — the British compelled to abandon the siege of Fart Meigs.


T


HE lofty eagle cutteth the air with his wings, and moveth rapidly along ; the fish of the deep glide swiftly through the waters ; the timid deer bounds through the thick forests with wonderful speed :

2 But Imagination surpasseth them all ; she ridefh •n the fleet winds ; she holdeth a stream of lightning in her hand.

3 In an instant she flieth from the frozen mountains of Zembla, in the regions of the north, to the burning sands of Africa in the torrid zone.

4 Now the sons of Columbia were peace-makers ; neither did their footsteps follow after warfare.

5 And, it is written in the holy scriptures, Plessed are the peace-makers, for they shall be called the chil- dren of God.

6 So the great Sanhedrim of the people sent two of the wise men of Columbia, the one named Gallatin and the other Bayard, into a distant country :

7 Even unto the extensive country of Russia, that there they raisrht meet the wise men of Britain, and heal the wounds of the nations, and make peace with one another.


WAR. 83

8 But the people of Britain yielded not to the entrea- ties of the great Sanhedrim ; therefore the war continued to rage.

9 So it carne to pass, on the fifth day of the fifth month, in the pleasant season of the year ; when the trees put forth their leaves and the air is perfumed with the sweet scent of flowers, and the blue violets bespread the green hillocks ;

10 That Harrison, the chief eaptain, from the west the brave warrior, who had entrenched himself In the strong hold of Meigs, nigh unto the river Miami, sallied forth against the savages and the men of Britain, that hemmed him in.

11 Now there were about a thousand soldiers of the king, and a thousand savages that had besieged the fort many days j and threw therein the balls of destruction, and strove to make captive the army of Columbia.

12 Nevertheless, Harrison, and his gallant little band, fought hard against them, and drove them from before the strong hold with great slaughter.

13 Likewise, the slain of Columbia was about four score, besides the wounded.

14 Moreover, the chief captain gave great honour to Miller and all the captains and soldiers under him ; even those called militia.

15 And the names of the states of Ohio and Kentucky were raised high, by the valiant acts of their gons that dayv


84 LATE


CHAP. XXIIL

Surrender of F&rt George and Fort Erie to the Amer- icans — Gen Brown drives the British from before Sacketfs Harbour with great loss — Gens. Winder and Chahdier made prisoners at Forty-mile Creek.


N<


OW, on the twenty-seventh day of the s;yne month, being thirty days after Zebulon had gone lo sleep with his fathers,

2 Henry, whose sir-name was Dearborn, and Lew- is.* the chief captains of the army of Columbia, and C i ncey the commander f the fleet of the United States, that moved on the waters of the great lake On- tario, essayed to go against Fort George and Fort Eri£^ in the province of the king

3 For they had previously concerted their plan and matured it ; and taken on board the ships, the army of Columbia, and a number of the destroying engines.

4 And when the vessels of Chauncey came nigh unto the place, they let the engines loose upon the fort, with a roaring noise.

5 In the meantime the army landed upon the shore, and went against the servants of the kin?.


  • Gen. Morgan Lewie,


■-WAR. $$■

6, And the men of Britain were frightened at the sound of the warring instruments that reached their camp, and they fled in dismay, towards the strong hold of Queenstown.

7 And they destroyed their tents, and their store- houses, and put a match to the black dust of their maga- zines, and blew them up into the air : this they did even from Chippewa to Albino.

8 Moreover, the slain and wounded of the king were two hundred two score and ten ; of the men of Colum- bia about tlaee score were slain and maimed.

9 So the forts of George and Erie were captured by the army and navy of the United States.

10 And Henry and Isaac, whose sir-name was Channcey, spake well of all the captains and men that fought with them.

11 The gallant captains Scott and Forsyth fought .bravely ; neither were they afraid.

12 Boyd, and M'Comb, and Winder, and Chandler, and Porter, and a host of heroes, turned not aside from the heat of the battle.

13 And here the noble spirit of the youthful Perry burst forth into view; a man made to astonish the world, and shower down glory upon the arms. of Colum- bia.

14 Now it happened about the same time, that the strong ships of Britain moved towards the other end of the lake, to the east thereof, and went against a place called Sackeft's Harbor.

15 The fleet of the king was commanded by a chief captain whose name was Yeo ; and, Prevost, the .go- vernor of Canada, commanded the army.


86 LATE

16 And on the morning of the twenty-ninth day of the month, they landed more than a thousand men oh the shores of Columbia,

17 Howbeit, a certain valiant man, even Jacob, whose sir-name was Brown, commanded the host of Columbia that went against them :

18 And Jacob, albeit a man of peace,* drove the men of Britain, and compelled them to flee rapidly from the shore, and get them into their vessels.

19 So Prevost and Yeo returned to the strong hold of Kingston.

20 And the skill of Jacob, in driving away the sol- diers of the king, pleased the people, and they honoured "him greatly.

21 Not many days after these things, there was a sore battle fought, near to a place called Forty-mile "Greek.

22 And it was so that Winder an'd Chandler, two brave captains of the United States, and about four score men, were coma upon unawares in the darkness of the night, and made captive by the servants of the king.

23 After which they were conveyed to the strong hold of Montreal, which lieth in the province of Cana- da, on the river St. Lawrence .

24 The officers and soldiers of Columbia fought bravely, and there were many slain and wounded on both sides :

25 Nevertheless, the army of the United States seated nigh unto the place.


• Gen. Brown is.a Quaker,


WAR- 87


chap. xxrv.

Capture of the Chesapeake — Commodore Decatur blockaded in New-London.


.N these days the pride of Britain was sorely wound- ed : for she had been discomfited upon the waters of the great deep ; and disappointment bad sharpened her anger.

2 The people of Columbia had triumphed over her ships ; and ber mighty armies had gained no honors.

3 Notwithstanding she had made peace with the na- tions of Europe, and her whole strength was turned against the people of Columbia.

4 The prosperity of many hundred years had flatter- ed her, and she was puffed up with the vanity thereof-; yea, she had forgotten herself.

5 So it came to pass, on the first day of the sixth month, that a certain strong ship of the king, called the Shannon, appeared before the haven of Boston, which lieth to the east.

6 And she bade defiance to the vessels of Columbia} for she had prepared herself for the event.

7 Now the Chesapeake, a fighting ship of the United States, was nigh unto the place ; and she was command- ed by the brave Lawrence, who had gained much bono*' in the sight of the people ; neither was he afraicL


  • 8 • LATE

8 And he went forth to battle against the vessel of 1 ■ the king, which was commanded by Broke, a valiant .man.

9 Moreover, the mischievous engines that were in the ship of Britain were more, and the number of their men greater than those of the vessel of the United States.

10 For Broke had gotten about two hundred men, and secreted them ; so that when the hour of danger ar«  rived they might assist his men, and fall unawares upon the men of Lawrence.

1 1 Nevertheless, towards the going down of the sun s the vessels drew nigh to each other.

12 And Lawrence spake unto his officers and his mariners, saying :

13 Now shall we set our engines at the work of de- struction ; let the lire issue, out of their mouths, as it were like unto fiery dragons.

14 And although their numbers be greater than ours, .yet we may be conquerois ; for he who is little of spirit

gaineth nothing.

15 But if, peradventure, we should be ovei:,ome, . - even then shall not the sacred cause of Liberty per- ish, neither shall the people of Columbia be disheart- ened.

16 Also, your names shall be recorded as the cham- pions of freedom.

17 And the nations of the earth shall learn with as- tonishment, how dearly you prize the inheritance of your fathers.

18 Now when Lawrence had made an end of speak- .-, Lug, they sat the destroying engines to work, and rushed i o&e upon another like fierce tygers.


WAR. 89

19 The fire and smoke were abundant, and tremen- dous was the noise that rent the air and floated upon the

waters .

20 And the Chesapeake fell close upon the Shannon, swords clashed with swords, and pikes with pikes ; and dreadful was the conflict thereof.

21 But the men of Broke were more numerous than the men of Lawrence, and overpowered them, by the means of their numbers.

22 Already had the valiant Lawrence fallen ; his life- blood flowed fast ; still he cryed out to his brave compan- ions, saying unto them, Don't give up the ship; his noble spirit fled, but his name shall not perish.

23 Moreover, about this time all the officers of the ship of the United States were either slain or sorely wounded; so she was captured by the vessel of the king.

24 And Satan rose up in the hearts of the conquerors, and they shot the balls of death down into the hold of the

•vessel of the United States, even against the halt and maimed who had surrendered themselves.

25 And when the tidings thereof reached the king- dom of Great Britain, the lords, the princes, the rulers, yea, all the people were rejoiced beyond measure.

26 And they bade their roaring engines utter their voices in London, their chief cily, that had been silent many years, even those i» the great tower,* which was built by William the Bastard, more than seven hundred years ago.


  • On this occasion they fired their tower guns,ithicji

had not been done since Nelson's victory.


90 LATE

27 Their joy was unbounded, for they had overcome eNE of the strong ships of Columbia.

28 Now the slain and the wounded on board the Chesapeake, were an hundred two score and four ; and there fell of the servants of the king about two hun- dred.

29 Amongst the slain of Columbia were also Augus- tus, whose sir-name was Ludlow, and another brave officer whose name was White.

30 And when the people of Columbia heard of a truth that Lawrence was slain, they mourned for him many days.

31 His body was conveyed to a place called Halifax,, in the province of the king, where they honoured his memory, and buried him for a while.

32 But in a short time thereafter his body was taken out of the earth, with the body of Ludlow, and convey- ed to the city of New- York, for interment.

33 And the captain's name who volunteered his ser- vices in this act of patriotism, and who brought the bodies away from Halifax, was Crowningshield, of Salem, in the state of Massachusetts.

34 So Lawrence was buried in the burial-place of his fathers, in his own land : and a great multitude of people went out to behold the funeral as it passed through the city.

35 And his valiant deeds shall live forever in the re- membrance of the people.

36 About this time, on the fourth day of the month, the brave Decatur essayed to go forth with his vessel ypon the waters of the mighty deep.

Q7 And the vessels that were with him were ca!Ie4


WAR. fti

the United States, the Hornet, and the Macedonian j the latter a strong ship which he had captured from the king.

38 But it was so, that some large vessels of Britain, •arrying each of them more than seventy of the destroy- ing engines, suffered him not to go forth.

39 Moreover, they wished to retake the Macedonian, that they might retrieve the shame of the capture there- of.

40 So the ships of Britain blockaded Decatur and his ships in the haven of New-London, which lieth in the state of Connecticut, nigh unto a place called Ston - ington, and they remained there many months.


LATE


CHAP. XXV.

Capture of Col. Boerstler and Major Chapin whh their command — treatment of Prisoners — Major Qha- piris escape.


OW there was much hard fighting on the borders, for the nations were wroth against one another, and many men were slain by the sword.

2 But it is written in t tie bowk of Jeremiah the prophet, that He who is slain by the sword, is better than he who is slain by famine.

3 Nevertheless, many of the soldiers of Columbia. suffered hunger : for they had given unto them unwhole- some food, and a scanty fare,

4 Although, when the servants of the king became captives to the people of Columbia, they were kindly treated, and partook of the fat of the land.

5 Now it came to pass, in the second year of the war, on the twenty third way of the sixth month,

6 That a captain of the United States, whose sir- name was lioerstltr, was ordered to go forth from the strong hold of Fort George, to annoy the enemy.

7 And the name of the place where he essayed to go) was called Beaver- dams, being distant from the strong hold of Queenstown about seventy furlongs.


WAR. 93

S And the namber of the men of wax of Columbia who followed after him was little' more than five hun- dred.

9 But when they came nigh unto the place, early in the morning of the next day, lo ! they were encompass- ed round about by the savages and soldiers of the king.

10 Nevertheless, they fought bravely for a time ; and Dearborn, the chief captain of Fort George, sent the valiant Chrystie to help hi.n out of his snare.

11 But Boerstler and his army had already become captive to the men of Britain.

12 And they made a covenant in writing, between one another, but the men of Britain violated the cove- nant.

13 Inasmuch as they permitted the savages to rob the officers of their swords, and their apparel, yea, even the shoes from off their feet.

14 After which the men of Columbia were command- ed to go, in boats, down to the strong hold of Kingston,, in the province of the king.

15 But a certain brave captain, called Chapin,* a cunning man withal, made his escape in a boat, and ar- rived at the strong hold of Fort George ; having, .by ihe strength of his single arm, overpowered three of the strong men of Britain.

  • Major Chapin.


$ti LATE


chap, xxvi:


Capture of Fort Schlosser and BlacJc Rock Gen.

Dearborn resigns his command to Gen. Boyd, on

account of sickness the Six Nations of Indians

declare tear against Canada.


A,


-ND it- came to pass, on the fourth day of the seventh moHth, which is the birth day of Columbian Liberty and Independence,

2 In the dark and solemn hour of the night, when the deadly savage walketh abroad, and the hungry wolves howl along the forest,

3 A band of the men of Britain crossed over the water from Chippawa to a place called Fort Schlosser,

4 An<* there was a handful of the men of the United States in the place, whom they made captive, being twelve in number.

5 Likewise, they carried away the bread and the meat, and some of the strong waters; also one of the destroying engines.

6 Moreover, the engine which they brought away was* made partly of brass, partly of iron, and partly of wood.

7 And the weight of the ball that issued out of its mouth was about two bantixfed shekels, after the shekel t>i the sanctuary.


WAR, M

) On the tenth day of the same month they also pass- ed over the river Niagara, towards a place called Black Rock, and the small band at the place lied.

9 And they destroyed the strong house, and the . camp with (ire, and carried away the flour, and the salt P

and such tilings as they stood in need of.

10 If owever, while they were yet carrying them a- way, there came a band of men of the United States, from the village of Buffaloe,

1 1 And let their instruments of war loose upon them ; and smote them even unto death ; albeit, those who were not slain escaped with their plunder.

12 And they tied hastily away, leaving nine of their slain behind, and more than half a score of cap- tives. *

13 The soldiers of the king were commanded by two men , the one called Bishop and the other Warren, and the men, of Columbia were .commanded by a chief captain, named Porter.*

14 About this time the savages and the men of war of Britain assailed the guards and the out-posts near unto Fort George

15 Day after day and night after night did they an- noy them; and many were slain on both sides.

16 And Dearborn, the chief captain of the fort, and of the host of Columbia round about Niagara, became sick and unable to go out to battle.

IT So Eoyd, a brave and tried warrior, was made hief captain in his stead, until Wilkinson, the chief captain, arrived : and the gallant Fraser was appointed one of his aids.

  • Gc», P. R Porter,


  1. 6 LATE

18 Now there wore some amongst the tribes of the savages, who had been instructed in the ways gf God, and taught to walk in the path of righteousness ;

19 For the chief governor of the land of Columbia, and the great Sanhedrim of the people, had taken them under their care.

20 And sent good men amongst them to preach the gospel, and instruct them in the sublime doctrine of the Saviour of the world.

21 And they hearkened unto the preachers, and were convinced, and their natures were softened.

22 Amongst these tribes were those who were called the Six nations of New York Indians ;

23 And their eyes were opened, and they saw the evil and wickedness of Britain.

24 So their chiefs and their counsellors rose up and flfade war against the province of Canada, and fought against the hired savages of the king pf Britain.

25 But in all their acts they suffered not the spirit of barbarians to rule over them.

26 They remembered the good counsel given to them hy their aged chief.*

27 And when the red savages and the men of Britain fell into their hands, they raised neither the tomahawk nor the scalping knife.

28 Nay, they treated them kindly ; and those who were slain in battle they disturbed not ; and their human- ity exceeded the humanity of the white men of Britain.


  • Alluding to an eloquent speech, delivered about

that time, to the Six NationSyby one of their old toar*

riors.


V/AR. 97


CHAP. XXVII.

Affairs on hake Ontario, between the fie eU of Com Chauncey and Sir James Yeo.


I


N those da\-s, the great waters of the lake Ontario were troubled with the movements of the fighting ships of Columbia, as well as those of the king.

2 Now the fleet of the king, which was commaaded by Yeo, who was a skilful captain, was greater than the fleet of Columbia, which was commanded by the brave Chauncey.

3 And the}' had contrived to move to and fro upon the feosom of the lake Ontario many months,

4 And two of the small vessels, called the Julia and the Growler, being parted from the fleet, fell into the hands of Yeo.

5 Nevertheless, Chauncey followed after Yeo, and hemmed him in. for a tine.

6 But a strong west wind arose and,j.he fleets were again separated.

7 Alter thisx!hauncey captured a number of small

fighting vessels, and about three hundred soldiers of the king.

8 Now it was so, that when Yeo put his fleet in battle array, as though he would fight,

9 Then Chauncey went out against him, to meet him, and give him battle ; btU • vhe heart of Yeo failed him

and he turned aside from the ships of Columbia.

i 2


^S LATE

10 So Chauncey sailed along the borders of the lake, "from the one end to the other ; even from Niagara to Sackett's Harbour, and Yeo followed him not.

1 1 Now all the vessels of the king, and all the ves- sels of the United States, that carried the destroying en- gines, upon the lake Ontario, being numbered were about

seventeen.

12 Howsoever, they cut down the tall trees of the forest, and hewed them, and built many more strong vessels ; although they had no gophar-wood amongst

hem in these days.

13 And they made stories to them, even to the third sxory, and they put windows in them, and they pitched them within and without with pitch ; after the fashion of the. ark.

14 And, lo ! some of the ships which they built upon the lake, carried about an hundred of the engines of death.

15 And the weight of a ball which they vomited forth was about a thousand shekels.

16 Now the rest of the acts of Chauncey and Yeo, -which they did, are they not written in the book of Pal- mer, the scribe ?*

  • Historical Register, an excellent publication, in

4 vols, octavo, printed in Philadelphia, 1 816, which contains the facts and the official documents of the late ■war.


WAR. &)


CHAP. XXVIH.


Affairs on Lake Champlain — pillage ofPlattsburgh Li- the British — bombardment of Burlington — depreda- tions committed in the Chcscpeake, and along the coast.


N,


OW the fighting vessels of Britain began to appear upon the lake, called by the ancient Gauls, Champlain.

2 And the vessels of war of Columbia that were upon the waters of the lake were not yet prepared for the battle; the name of their commander was M'DonoHgh^ a stripling.

3 So, it came to pass, on the thirty and first day of the seventh month, that the vessels of the king came for- ward against Plattsburgh, whieh lieth on the borders of the lake.

4 And there were none to defend the place ; for the army of Hampton, a chief captain of the United States,

was encamped upon the opposite side of the lake, at a place called Burlington, in the state of Vermont.

5 And the number of the soldiers of the king that land- ed at Plattsburgh was more than a thousand men, and the name of their chief captain was Murray.

■o And a captain of the United States, whose name was Mocers, a man of valor, strove to gather tocher


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-the husbandmen of the place ; but they were not'^ nough.

7 So the army of the king captured the place ; and ihe men of Columhia fled before the men of Britain.

8 Moreover, the wickedness which had been commit- ted at Hampton,was noised abroad, even from the shores of Virginia to lake Champlain.

9 Accordingly, all the women and children, who were able," suddenly departed from the place, lest the same thing might, peradventure, happen unto them.

10 Neither were they deceived in judgment ; for, lo ! when the place was given up, and a covenant made, the servants of the king proved faithless.

11 They abided not by the contract : saying, Pish ! ye are but yankees, therefore will we do to you as seemeth meet unto us !

12 So they burnt the houses, and ail other things be- longing to the United States, with fire.

13 After which they fell upon the merchandise, the goods, and the chatties of ail manner of persons : Ray the persons of some of the women were abused :

14 Meanwhile they forced othcis to put the burning brand to their own dwellings; or pay them tribute.

15 They killed the cattle, and prepared them food ; and after they had eaten and drank, they overturned the tables.

16 So, when their vengeance Avas crfrr.pleted, they •departed to other places and committed like evils.

17 About the same time the vessels of the king that sailed on the lake, went against the town of IJurik»gton, •where the army of Hampton was.

J 8 But when the men of Columbia began to let the


WAiR. 101

destroying engines loose upon them, from the strong hold before the town, they fled in dismay.

19 Now while these things were passing in the north, the greedy sons of Britain were laying desolate the small villages of the south.

20 On the waters of the Chesapeake they captured the small vessels and made spoil thereof.

21 Moreover, they gat possesion of a small place called Kent Island, and robbed the poor and needy; for There was no mercy in them,

22 Yea, it was said of a truth, and talked abroad, that they came in the night time, and disturbed the small cattle, and the fowls, and took them for their own use, and crawled away like men ashamed ;

23 Thus committing a sin, by violating the eighth commandment of God, which saith, Thou shalt not STEAL.

24 Even the state of North-Carolina escaped them not ; they landed a thousand men of war at a place call- ed Ocracocke.

25 And again the work of destruction began ; they spread terror and dismay whithersoever they went.

26 They troubled the men of Columbia all along the sea coast, which is more than eight thousand furlongs, from north to south.

27 Moreover, they gat much plunder : even much oi. the good things with which the land of Colombia abounded].


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CHAP XXIX.

Major Croghau defeats the British and Indians, under Gen. Proctor, in their attack en Fort Stephenson, Lower Sandusky.


E V ERTIIELESS, it came to pass, that Harisoa, the chief captain of the north west army, had placed a captain, a young man, in the hold called Fort Stephen- son, to defend it.

2 Now the fort lieth at the western end of the great lake Erie, at a place called Sandusky.

3 A,&d, the, number x>f the soldiers that were with th£ youth in the held was about an hundred and three score, and they had only one of the destroying engines.

4 Now the name of the young man was George, anil his sir-name was Croghan.

5 So, on the first day of the eighth month, about the going down of the sun, a mighty host from Maiden ap- peared before the hold ;

6 Even a thousand savages, and about five hundred men of war of Britain ; and Proctor was the commander thereof.

7 Moreover, they brought the instruments of destruc- tion in great plenty even howitzers, which weie not sjenown in the days of the rhi'.dren of Israel.

S -hid they hsd prepared themselves for the fight?


WAR. 10$

afnd encompassed the place round about, both by land" and by water.

9 After which Proctor sent a message to the brave Croghan, by a captain whose name was Elliot, and the words thereof were in this sort :

10 Lo ! now ye can neither move to the right nor to the left, to escape, for we have hemmed you in ;

1 1 Therefore, that your Mood may not be spilt in vain, we command that ye give up the strong bold into the hands of the servants of the king, and becorae captives.

12 We have the destroying engines in abundance, and- we are a numerous host.

13 Furthermore, if ye refuse then shall the wild sa- vages be let loose upon you ; and there shall b-e none left among you to go and tell the tidings thereof,

14 But when Croghan heard the message,, lie answer- ed and said unto Elliot, (jet thee now to thy chief cap- tain, and say unto him, I refuse ; neither will I hearken unto him :

15 And if it be so, that he come against me with his whole host, even then will I not turn aside from the fierce battle ; though his numbers were as the sand on the sen shore.

iG Lo! David, of old, with a sling a'ud a stone, slew the mighty Goliah : and shall the people of Columbia be afraid, and bow before the tyrants of Europe ?

If Then Elliot returned to the army of the king : and immediately the mouths of their engines were opened against the fort.

18 And the noise thereof continued a long time : even until the next day ; but their battering prevailed not.

19 Now when Proctor saw it was of no avail, he di-


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vided his host into two bands, and appointed a captain to each band ; and they moved towards the fort and assail- ed it with great violence.

20 But the men of Croghan were prepared for them ; and they let loose their weapons of war upon them, and set their destroying engine to work, and smote the men of Britain, hip and thigh, with great slaughter.

21 And the deep ditch that surrounded the fort was strewed with their slain and their wounded.

23 So the host of Britain were dismajed and over- thrown, and fled in confusion from the fort into the for_ est ; from whence, in the dead of the night, they went in- to their vessels," and departed from the place.

23 Now the loss of the men of Britain was. about an hundred two score and ten ; and of the men of Columbia there was one slain aud seven wounded.

24 But when Proctor had rested his army he sent a skilful physician to heal the maimed which he had fled from and left behind.

25 But Hanson, the chief captain, said unto him, Al- ready have my physicians bound up their wounds, and given them bread and wine, and comforted them ; after the manner of our country.

26 For we suffer not the captives that fall into our hands to be buffeted or maltreated j neither want they for any thing.

27 So the physician of the king's army was permitted to return to his own camp.

28 Moreover, great honor and praise were bestowed upon the brave Croghan, the captain of the fort, for his valiant deeds ; and his name was spoken of with joy throughout the land of Columbia.


WAR. 105.-


CHAP. XXX.


British schooner' Dominica, of 14 Guns, captursdbtt t.';?j>rcva'ecr Decatur, of 7 guns — U. S. brig Argus captured by the Pelican — capture of the Boxer by ike U. S. brig Enterprize.


-Lit OW the war continued to rage without abatement upon the waters of the. great deep ;

2 And manifold were the evils that came upon the children of men by the means thereof*

3 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim of the people were forced to bestir themselves ; and they had con- tinued their councils day after day without ceasing.

4 And it came to pass, that there was a dreadful battle fought between a vessel of the king, and a private vessel ©f Columbia;,

5 And the name of the vessel that fought was De- catur., and the captain's name was Diron, a Gaul.

6 And it was so, that about the fourth day of the eighth month, the Decatur having sailed out of the ha- ven of Charleston, being in the state of Soulh Carolina, fell in with one of the fighting vessels of the king, called the Dominica.

7 But the destroying engines of the king's vessel were two fold greater in numbers than those of the Decatur.

K


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8 Nevertheless, they set them to work, so that they groaned beneath the fire and smoke ;

9 And in about the space of an hour the Dominica was conquered and taken captive.

10 For when the vessels came close together, the nien smote one another with their swords and weapons of war ; yea, even the balls of iron they cast at each other, with their hands, and slew one another with wonderful slaughter.

11 Inasmuch as there were slaia and maimed of the Icing thiee score souls; those of the Decatur were about a score : moreover the captain of the Dominica Was slain.

12 The fight was an unequal one; and the bravery of Diron gained him a great name, for he overcame the enemies of freedom ; although their force was greater than his.

13 After this, on the fourteenth day of the same month, there was another sore battle between a small vessel of the United States, called the Argus and the Pelican, a ship of the king.

14 Now the Pelican was somewhat stronger than the Argus, and they were stubborn and kept the destroying ©ngincs to work, with great noise about forty and five minutes.

15 And the brave captain of the \rsrus, whose name was Allen, was wounded unto death, wd the vessel of Columbia was captured by the shin o Britain, the name of the commander whereof was Maples.

16 Of the men of Columbia six were slain and seventeen wounded ; of the men ©f Britain the slaic and wounded were five.


WAR. ior

-<7 Nov/ the death of Allen was .spoken of with scr- row throughout the land of Columbia, for he had de? fended the vessel of the United States nobly ; and cap- tured some merchant ships of Britain,

IS Even the enemy regarded him for his bravery, for they buried him with honour in their own country,, not far from the place where he became captive, which vas in the waters of the king, even in St. George's, Channel.

.19 But it came to pass, on the fifth day of the next month, in the same year,

20 That a certain small vessel of Columbia, carrying the engines of destruction, commanded by a gallant man, whose name was Burrows, fell in with an- other small vessel of the king, called the Boxer and the captain thereof was a brave man, and his name was Clythe.

21 In the language of the people of the lapd, the vessel of Columbia was called the Enterprize.

22 Now when the vessels drew nigh unto each other the men shouted with loud shouting.

^3 And immediately they let the mischievous engines loose upon one another, with a noise like unto thunder.

24 But it happened, that in about the space of forty minutes, the Boxer was overcome ; but she was taken somewhat unawares : •

23 For, lo ! the pride of the men of Britain had made them foolish : and, thinking of the conquest, they nailed Britannia's red-cross to the mast of the vessel.

26 Whereupon, after they were overcome, they cried ajdud for mercy, saying,


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27 Behold ! our colors are fast ; and we canno. quickly unloose them; nevertheless, we will be prisoner:} unto you , therefore spare us.

28 So the brave mariners of Columbia spared them, and stopped the destroying engines ; for their hearts were inclined to mercy.

29 However, this was another bloody fight ; fur there fell of the men of Britain forty that were slain out- right, and seventeen were wounded.

30 And the loss of Columbia in slain and maimed was about fourteen.

31 And the commanders of both vessels were slain ; and they buried them w th honor hi the town of Port- land, which leaveth Boston to the west ; for the battle was fought hard by.

32 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim wns pleased with the thing, and gave unto the .lear^st kinsman of Borrows a medal of gold, in token of remembrance thereof.*


  • Mathew L. D'tvis, of New-York, a printer,

a patriot , and a philant ropist, on a tour in the eastern States, passing through Portland and the burial place of Burrows (which wis without a memorial,) being pointed out to him, generously delayed his journey Until, at his own expense, he had caused a monument to be erected over the grave of the valiant ; which bears the following inscription, equally creditable tv the modest merit of Mir; Davis. — to his head. and. ift ■his heart :


WaK ~k<09


CHAP. XXXL

IHie capture of ihe British Fleet on Lake Erie jhy the American Fleet, under Com. Perry.


HE Lord, in the plenitude of his wisdom and pow- er, ordaineth all things which come to pass: and the doings are for the benefit of man, and for the glory oi God.

2 For where is the evil which hath not turned to an ad- vantage, and been a warning', and swallowed up the evil that might have come ?

BENEATH THIS STONE

Moulders

THE BODY OF

W ILL I A M B U it R W S, Late Commander of the -UNITED STVTES' BRIG ENTERP.U7jE, Who was mortally wounded oathe.§th of September, • I$13, in an action, which contributed to increase the fame of American valour, by caplirrmj his BRIT. MAJESTY'S BRIG BOXER; after a severe contest of 45 minutes. <A passing" stranger has erected this monument of respect to the manes of a patriot,, wbo in the hour oi peril, , obeyed the loud summons of ;<n injured country, and who galhuitly met, fought and conquered the foeman,

k 2


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3 Now about this time the strong vessels of Columbia that moved upon the face of the blue waters of the great lake Eiie, were given in charge to Oliver, whose sir- name was Pei ry.

4 And he was a prudent man, and had prepared him- self to meet the vessels of the king, even forty days before- hand.

5 And the name, of of the captain of the fleet of Bri- tain was Barclay, a maa of great valor ; but he boasted and was vain of his fleet, for it was more powerful than the fleet of Columbia.

6 Nevertheless, it came to pass, in the one thousand eight hundred and thirteenth year, on the tenth day of the ninth month, early in the morning, about the rising of the sun,

7 The valiant Perry beheld the fleet of the king at a distance upon the lake ; so he unmoored his vessels and went out to meet them in battle array, fleet against fleet.

8 And when their white sails were spread upon the bosom of the lake, they appeared like unto a squadron of passing clouds.

9 A gentle breeze wafted the hostile vessels towards one another.

10 It was silence upon the waters; save when the •sound of musical instruments fell sweetly upon the

ear.

11 But it happened, a Utile before the midday, that the shouts of the men of war oJ Britain were heard, and

.the shouts of the men of Columbia.

12 And now the destroying ^engines began tj utter


WAR. Ill

their thunders vomiting forth fire and smoke and brim- stone in abundance.

13 And suddenly the waters were in an uproar ; and the bellowing noises sounded along the lake.

1-1 Moreover, the chief force of the ship? of the king was put against the vessel in which Perry was ;

15 And' the vessel was called the Liwrence, after a brave man, whose dying words waved upon her aloft :

16 Now, behold, a thousand balls of iron skim the surface of the waters, swift as shooting stars.

17 But when the battle waxed hot, and Perry saw that the tackling of his vessel was shot away, and his men were slain and wounded with great slaughter, and his des- troying engines became silent,

1 S He put the charge of the vessel into the hands of one of his officers, whose name was Yaraell, a trusty man j

19 Then, with the starry banner of Columbia in his band, did the gallant Perry leap into his cock-boat, while his brave mariners quickly conveyed him to another fighting vessel of the United States called the Niagara, commanded by a valiant m in, whose name was "Elliot.

20 After this again the vessels uttered heir thunders and fought hard, and the men of Columbia poured out destruction upon die servants of the king.

21 And it came to pass, that the skilful contrivance of Perrv, and the bravery of his men, at length forced the whole fleet of the king to become captive— even unto the cock boats of Columbia.

22 Fhtts again was the mighty lion humbled before .the eagle : lor six strong vessels of iiritaiu were overcome

a! one time.


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'23 And the slain and wounded of the king that day, was about an hundred thirty and five ; beside there were a^housand prisoners.

24 The loss of the United States was> twenty and se- ven that were killed, and four score and ten were wound- ed.

25 Moreover, the number of the men of Britain made captive was more than all the men of Perry's squadron.

26 Now Perry was a righteous man, and like the good Samaritan, took care of the halt and maimed, and put skilful men to bind up their wounds ; and the men . of Britain blessed him.

.27 Neither was he a man puffed up with vanity, even "in the hour of victory ;

28 For when he had conquered the fleet of Britain, lie wrote to Jones,* one of the scribes of the great San- hedrim, with modesty, saying,

29 To day it hath pleased the Lord that the people of Columbia should triumph over their enemies.

30 At the same time he wrote to Harrison, the chief captain of the host of Columbia, whose army was at the bay of Sandusky, saying, \\c have met the enemy, and tfhey are ours !

3 1 Then did the enemies of Columbia weep ; and the rgainsayer put on deep mourning.

32 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim honored Perry with <great honor ; and gave him. medals, with devices curious- ly wrought.

33 Likewise, the people gave him much silver plate, ■With gravings thereon, mentioning his deeds.

34 And the by e-stander might read his triumph;.-, his , Country's eyes.


WAR. IIS

33 His sons shall hear him spoken of with pleasure,

and his name shall be mentioned in the song oftae virgins. 36 Where, oh ! Bratain, are now thy mighty admi- rals ? where thy Nelson ? where the transcendant glory they gained for thee ?

57 Alas ! it hath expired upon the waters of Erie be- ■fore the destroyin y engir.es of Perry !

  • }F. Jones, Secretary of tJie Navy,


««S*»r« 


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CHAP. XXXII.

Capture of Maiden and Detroit — the army of Gap. Proctor -retreat towards the Moravian towns — Gen. Harrison pursues them.


IS"


OW when Perry had taken care of the captives, and the wounded, and set them upon the shore,

% He began to convey the army of Harrison from STort Meigs and round about.

3 And having gathered them together into his vessels, he brought them, and landed them nigh unto the strong hold of Maiden.

4 And it came to pass, on the twenty-third clay of the same month, in which Perry conquered the fleet of Britain,

5 That Harrison, the chief captain, began to march the host of Columbia against the strong hold of Maiden, and captured a town called Amherstburg, nigh there- unto.

6 Now Proctor was the chief captain of the savages and servants of the king.

7 And when he saw the men of Columbia approach, he destroyed the fort, the tents, and the store-houses of the king, and, with his whole host, fled swiftly towards Sandwich.


WAR. 143

8' And Harrison, and the host of Columbia, followed hard after him.

9 Now when the savages of the wilderness beheld the men of Britain flee before the warriors of Columbia, their spirits sunk, and tliey were sore amazed.*

10 Moreover, they upbraided the servants of the king, saying, Lo ! ye have deceived us, and led us from our hunting grounds, and we are anhungered.

11 For, verily, ye promised us bre id and wiue,f and silver and gold ; yea, even that we should drink of the strong waters of Jamaica, if we would go out with you and fight the battles of the king, against the men of Columbia.

11 But, behold ! now ye would run away aixl leave us to fight alone.

13 Whereupon many of their tribes cast away their tomahawks, and refused to fight under the banners of the king.

14 And when Harrison came to Sandwich, Procter and his army had departed from the place, and fled to- wards the riv^r Thames, near Moravian Town.

15 (Now the Thames emptieth its waters into the lake St. Clair, and the .Moravian Towns lie upon the river, about an hundred miles from Maiden, towards the north, in the province of Upper Canada.)

16 Moreover, as they joarnied on, the brave M'Ar- thur crossed over with his band to the strong hold of Detro't, and took it.


  • See Tecumseh's letter to Proctor.

i At t/iis time the British army were short of supplies.


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17 But the savages and the men of Britain had sfe 6 - stroyed those things which they could not carry away, and fled in haste.

18 So M'Arthur, in whom the chief captain piif mack faith, remained at Detroit in the charge thereof.

19 And it came to pass, when Harrison saw that the host of Britain fled before him. lie departed from Sand- wich and went after them ; it being on the second day of the next month.

20 Aud his whole army followed after him, in all a- bout three thousand brave men from the back-woods of • the state of Kentucky and the pleasant villages of. Ohio.

21 Now Harrison was a mighty man of valor, and vo man could make him afraid ; aud the caj tains and ofl- cers that were with him were all valiant num.

22 An:\, when some of ids captains said unto him, Lo ! i* ere is a feast to day : go thou and par-take thereof, and refresh thyself, and we will watch ;

23 He answered and s'aid unjo t- em, Nay, shall I go and riot, whilst the warriors of Columbia die on the fro- zen ground' ?

24 No, their fate shall be my fate ; and their glory shall be my glory.

25 So he wrapped himself in his cloak, and lay down in his own tent.

26 And the husbandmen of Kentucky were led on by their valiant governor, whose name was Shelby, and he was a man well stricken in yeans ; even at the age of threescore did he go out against the enemies of CV liunbia; and all the people rejoiced in him.


WAR. 127

27 And the gallant Perry staid not behind ; but freely offered his strength, and was one of the right hand men of Harrison, with whom he followed after the host of Britain.

28 Nevertheless, it happened that a band of the sa- vages strove to give hindrance to the army of Columbia;

29 But the men of Columbia let two of the destroying engines loose upon them, and they fled into the wilder- ness like wild deer.


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CHAP. XXXIIL

Battle of the Tha??ies — Gen. Harrison captures the British army under Gen Proctor — illuminations or account of it — news of it received in England.


JL


-ND it came to pass, oh the fifth day of the samp month, that Proctor, with the savages and the army of trie king, rested upon advantageous ground, on the banks of the river Thames,

2 Where he drew his army up in the order of battle^ after the fashion of these days, and prepared himself to meet the host of Columbia,

3 Now the army of Proctor was mighty ; for he had a thousand horsemen : but the number of the savages that followed after himareaot known to this time; how- beit, they were many.

4 And they were under the charge of a chief warrior*, whom they called Tecumseh, a savage whom the king Mad made a chief captain.*

5 And it came to pass, on the same day, in the latter part of the day, that the army of Harrison drew nigh unto tr.e place.


• Brig. General


WAR. i 19

6 And he called together his captains of fifties, and his squadrons, and encouraged them, and commanded them to prepare themselves for the fight.

■f And he put the host of Columbia in battle array against the host of Britain, army against army.

£ Now the sound of the trumpet, the cymbal, the bugle-horn, and the noisy drum, echoed through the deep wilderness.

■9 And the red savages appeared in the field before the men of Britain, for they had put them as a shield,, in^he front of the battle.

10 And they yelled with dreadful yellings, and sound- ed aloud the war-whoop, which was the signal of death.

11 But the army of Colombia rushed upon them with the fierceness of lions.

12 And the weapons of war were used without toet- cy ; the foxes and the beavers -crept into their holes, for the destroying engines frightened the wild beasts, so that they looked for their hiding places.

13 The gallant Johnson* fell upon them with a band of chosen horsemen, and he drove them before him like chaff before the wind, and smote their chief warrior,+ and slew him with his own hand, so that he fell to the earth.

14 And the host of Columbia assailed the men of Britain on all sides, and overcame them, and made them prisoners of war ; whereupon the engines ceased to mt?r their thunders.


  • Col. Johnson, of the Kentucky light-horse.

t Tecumsph ; toko was at that moment in the act of thfioting the colonel.


120 . LATE

15 Howbeit, Proctor escaped, on a swift running horse, with a handful of his captains that were under him.

16 Now the number of prisoners captured by the ar- fiiy of Harrison that day were about six hundred.

17 And the slain and wounded of the men of Britain were thirty and three ; and the same number of savages were slain.

18 Of the army of Columbia seven were slain and two score and tw© were wounded.

19 But the men of Kentucky and Ohio, whose sons and brothers and fathers had been inhumanly slaughter- ed at the River Raisin, slew not a single captive.

20 But they treated them as men ; thus rendering good for evil, according to the word of the Lord.

21 Moreover, they captured six of the destroying en- gines that were made of brass, and two that were made of iron ; besides many weapons of war.

22 Now three of the brass engines were those given to the men of Britain, at the capture of Detroit, the first year of the war, and were the same that had been taken from the king in the days of Washington.

23 Soon after the battle, Harrison returned with his army to Detroit, where many of the savages had assem- bled, to repent of their evils, and ask for mercy from the chief captain.

24 So Harrison made a covenant with them, and they were thankful, and gave him hostages.

25 Now there were great rejoicings in the land of "Columbia, and the hearts of the people were exceeding glad,


■WAR. 121

26 So -that when the news thereof reached them they drank wine ; and when the evening came they lighted their candles, and put them in candlesticks of silver and candlesticks of gold, and placed them in the windows of their houses.

27 And there were many thousands of them ; and the light thereof was as though the stars had fallen from heaven.

28 This did they throughout the land of Columbia, -from the district of Maine, in the east, to the state of

Georgia, in the south.

29 And, when the Prince Recent, and the chief counsellors, and the wise men of Britain, heard the ti- ding?, for a truth, that their fleet and their army were captured, they were astonished beyond measure.

30 They looked at one another like men who had lost their wiis : they were sileat, and their tongues clave to the roof of their mouths.

31 Their knees smote one against another., for the strength of Britain was shaken ; her valiant warriors had lost their honour ;* and her glory was outshone.

32 Now there was great honour and praise bestowed upon Harrison for his courage, and his valiant acts ; and the people remembered his name with pleasure.

33 Moreover, he gave great [raise to Shelby, the governor, and ferry, and Johnson, and all the brave men that were with him.


  • Doubly lost it: by water and by land; by being-

^■conquered r and by being erne/. h 2


122 LATE

34 And in the same mowth, when the object of the army was fulfilled, the husbandmen of Columbia return- ed every man to his own house.

35 8ut Harrison and Perry, and the band of war- fiorsof the great Sanhedrim, went into their vessels.

36 And they moved from Detroit, and came in the ships of Perry, to Buffaloe, nigh unto the river Niaga- ra, to meet Wilkinson, who came from the south, and was appointed chief captain of the army of the <sentre.


WAK. K§g


CHAP. XXXIV.


Wax with, the Creek Nation of Indians — massacre at Fort Mimms — Georgia and Tennessee militia, under General Jackson retaliate.


w<


OW it came to pass, while these things were going on in the north, and the repentant savages laid their murderous weapons at the feet of Harrison,

2 That the servants of the king were stirring up the spirit of Satan in the savages of the wilderness of the south ;

3 And placing the destroying engines into their hands that they might shed the blood of the people of Colum? bia.

4 Now these southern barbarians were called the Creek nation of Indians.

5 Moreover, they were a nation of savages that dwelt in the back-woods and the wilderness round about the states of Georgia, Tennessee, and the Mississippi Territory.

6 " So } about this .time, they took their weapons 'of death in their hands, and went against the strong bold «f Fcrt Mimms, which lieth on a branch of the river


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Mobile, that emptieth its waters into the great Gulf of Mexico.

7 And they captured the place ; and with the fury of demons they murdered, with the tomahawk, the men, the women, and the infants r hat were in and about the fori, sparing neither age nor sex ; and slaying the prison- ers that begged for mercy.

8 And the number of the people cf Columbia that Were massacred and burnt alive in their houses, that day, was about four hundred ; however, there were an hun- dred savages slain.

9 For it was a sore fight ; and Beasly, who command- ed the fort, fought hard against them ; howbeit, he was

■dims.

10 But it came to pass, in the same year, that the people of Columbia were revenged of the evil ;

.11 Andrew, whose sir-name was Jackson, a man of courage and valor, was chief captain in the south ;

12 And he sent out one of his brave captains, whose name was < offee, with a st.ong band ; even nine Jiu.ndred mighty hoi semen :

13 Now these were the valiant husbandmen of Geor- gia and the back-woods of Tennessee ; their horses were fleet as the roe-buck ; their weapons of war were certain death.

14 So they went forth against a town of the savages called Tallushatches, on the second day of the eleventh month.

15 And on the next day they encompassed the town roundabout; and the savages prepared themselves for

i
attle.


WAR. 125

16 About the rising of the sun they sounded their th-ums. and began their horrible yellings.

17 But ihev frightened not the hearts of the brave men of Tennessee.

18 So when Coffee had stationed his captains and his men of war about the town, in the order of battle, the whole army shouted aloud ;

19 And the instruments of destruction were let loose upon them on all sides j and they fought with all their Kaight.

'20 But the men of Columbia rushed upon them, and subdued them, and made about four score women and children captive.

21 And slew about two hundred of their warriors ^ leaving not a man to tell the tidings.

22 For, lo ! when the savages of the wilderness com- mit great evils and transgressions against .the people of Columbia,

23 The great Sanhedrim of the people send out migh- ty armies against them, that are able to overthrow them, and make their towns a desolation, and lay waste their habitations.

24 Now the loss of the army of Columbia that day, was five slain and about forty wounded.

25 And Jackson, the chief captain, gave great praise to Coffee, and all the valiant men that fought that day,

26 On the next day after the battle, the army of Co- lumbia returned to their camp, at a place called the Ten~ Islands.


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CHAP. XXXV.

"Continuation of the War with the Creeks — Gen. Jack' don's great victory over them — they sue for peace — jt. treaty is concluded with them.


±\ OTWITHSTANDING their discomfiture, the aation of the Creeks were still bent on warring against the people of Columbia.

2 And they committed many outrages upon the in- habitants of the states round about.

3 But it came to pass, on the seventh day of the same month, that a messenger came to Jackson, the chief captain, and spake unto him, saying :

,4 Lo ! even now, more than a thousand savages have pitched their tents at Talledoga, near the strong hold of Lashley, with intent to assail it.

5 Immediately Jackson took two thousand hardy men, who were called volunteers, because they had, un- solicited, offered their sei vices to their country, and led them against the savages.

6 Now. the men of war that followed after him were mostly from the state of Tennessee, and men of daunt- less courage.

7 So, early in the morning .of the next day, the army ,of Jackson drew nigh the place, in battle array.


WAR. 127'

8" And the savages came out towards the army of Co- lumbia, with shoutine and yellings : and again the en gines- of destruction were used plentifully.

9 And the leaden balls whizzed about their cars- like unto a nest of hornets.

10 But the horsemen, and the whole army of Jack- son, rushed upon the savages, and slew them with great slaughter, and overcame them.

1 1 And the number of savages slain that day was a- bout three hundred ; and a red- cross banner of the Spanish nation was found amongst them, and taken.

12 Seventeen of the men of Columbia, were slain and about four score wounded.

13 So, when the battle was over, Jackson returned to his own camp.

14 After these things had come to pass, on the twelfth day of the month, a certain captain, whose sir-Dame was White, was sent against another place called the Hillabee-Towns.

15 And, on the eighteenth day of the same month, he took the towns, and destroyed them, and slew three score of the savages, and made about two hundred two score and ten prisoners.

lG About eleven days afterwards, a valiant captain, whose name was Floyd, with his brave men, went a- gainst the towns of Autossee and Tallisee, which lie on the banks of the river Tallapoosie.

17 And Floyd went against them with boldness and triumphed over them and killed about two hundred of them, and burned their towns with fire, and slew the king of Autossee, and the king of Tallisee, who were the kings of two tribes.


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1 8 Moreover, on the thirteenth day of the next month, Claiborne, a governor, and a man of valor, went against the savages that dwelt on the river Alabama.

19 And he marched with his army through the wilder- ness more than an hundred miles, to a town built opon a place called by the savages the Holy-Ground, where three of the Indian prophets dwelt.

20 Now there were lying prophets among the savages, even as there were in the days of old, among the children of Israel ; and they prophesied according to their own wishes ;

21 And those of shallow understanding believed them, and were led into a snare, whereby their whole tribe was nigh being destroyed.

22 And Wetherford, the chief warrior of the Creek nation, was there also with his band.

23 And he fought hard against Claiborne; but he was" overthrown, and fled, and the town was burnt, e- ven two hundred houses.

24 Notwithstanding all these tribulations, the depre- dations of the savages of the south were not stayed.

25 So Jackson, the chief captain, v/ent out against them with his army, and atta eked them at their strong hold, on the waters of the Tallapcosie, where they were entrenched, with more than a thousand warriors.

26 Now this was on the twenty and seventh dav of the third month, in the one th ousand eight hundred and fourteenth year of the christian era.

27 And Jackson set his destroying engines to work, and fought de sperately against them, for about the space



Ma j? GErr? AinDiairyr Jacxso^t



Jin graver? fir Jfunt't //rfvi' r/Y/,r Hi


WAR, 129,

of five hours ; when he overcame them, so that only, about a score escaped.

28 Seven hundred and fifty of the savage warriors were found slain in battle; and two hundred two score and ten women and children became captives to the army of Columbia.

29 Manahoee, their chief prophet, ^vas smitten in the mouth, and slain, and two other false prophets were slain with him.

SO Moreover, about the first day of the sixth month, a brave man, whose name was Pearson, with the hus- bandmen of the states of North and South Carolina,, went against them along the borders of the Alabama, and captured about six hundred of them.

Si Thus did the men cf Columbia triumph over them, and conquer them, even to. the seventh time.

32 And so the judgment of the Lord fell upon them- for their unrighteousness, and for their wicked and mur- derous deed's.

33 After which they repented of their evil, having, through their own folly, lost many thousand warriors.

34 And their chief warriors gave up their instru= ments of destruction, and laid them at the feet of Jackson, the chief captain.

35 Even Wetberford, the chief warrior, gave him* self up to Jackson, saying, I fought tvith my might ; but I have brought evil upon my nation ; and thou hast^ slain my warriors ; and I myself am overcome

36 Now the savages are easily inflamed and roused ta works of sin and death ; and of their weakness the ser- vants of the king are not ashamed to take advas^

M


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tage j even to the ruin of the poor and ignorant bar- barians.

37 So the warriors and the whole nation of the Creeks, being tired of a destructive war, entreated the men of Columbia for peace, saying unto Jackson,

38 Lo ! now are our eyes opened to our own profit j now will we make peace with you.

39 And if ye will no more suffer the fire, and the sword, and the destroying engines to spread desolation amongst us,

40 Then will we make a covenant with you, and give you for an inheritance a great part of the land which our fathers inherited before us.

41 And the length and the breadth thereof shall be about as large as the whole island of Britain, whose men of war have led us into this snare.

42 For although the king, who calleth himself our fa- ther, across the great waters, did put the instruments of death into our hands, and give us the black dust in abun- dance; nevertheless, he deceived us ; and in the hour of danger his servants left us to take care of ourselves.

43 So Jackson made a covenant with them ; and it was signed by the chiefs of their nation.

44 And after it had been examined by the wise men and the great Sanhedrim of the people, it was ratified and signed with the hand-writing of James, the chief governor of Uie land of Columbia.


WAR, lh


CHAP. XXXVf.

Plan of attack on Montreal defeated.


HE frailty of man speaketh volumes ; one man ac- cuseth another ; but where is he who is perfect ?

2 Man deviseth mighty plans in his own mind, but he accomplished them net.

3 He is wise in his own conceit, but his wisdotfl faileth him : he seeth folly in others, but perceiveth not his own ; he is as a reed shaken with the wind.

4 Now the country of Columbia was assailed on every side by the enemies of freedom.

5 And in the hope that the war might speedily cease, and an end be made of the shedding of blood, the great Sanhedrim of the people wished to push their armies into the heart of the provinces of the king, even te Montreal.

6 So they pitched upon certain chief captains, who were well skilled in the arts of warfare : and Wilkinson and Hampton were the names of the captains ;

7 And Brown, and Boyd, and Covington, and Swift, and Coles, and Purdy, and Ripley, and Swartwout, and Fraser, and many others, were valiant captains un- der them.

8 Not many days after Harrison returned from bis triumph over Proctor's army ; a»d in the same year,


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it came to pess, that Wilkinson conveyed his army frees Fort George and the country of Niagara, to Sackett ? «  Harbor, at the east end of lake Ontario; leaving Har- rison and M'Clure behind, at the strong hold of Fort George.

9 From Sackett's Harbor Wilkinson moved to a place called Grenadier Island ; and in the first week of the eleventh month he arrived at Ogdensburgh, in order to go against the strong hold of Montreal.

10 Now the army of Hampton rested nigh unto lake Champlain; and about the same time he moved towards the borders of the king.

11 And Wilkinson sent a messenger to him, and ea-

' treated him to come and meet him, and join the two aar- mies at the village of St. Regis.

12 The same night Wilkinson with his army crossed the great river St. Lawrence, near by the strong hold of Frescot, which lieth in the dominions of the king.

13 And he moved down with about six thousand men towards the hold of Montreal, until he came to a place called Crystler's Farms, nigh unto Williamsburgh.

14 Now, at this place, on the eleventh day of the eleventh month, a strong band of the men of war of Britain, from Kingston and round about, fell upon his army in the rear, and annoyed them greatly.

1 5 At length, on the same day, a part of the army of Columbia turned about, and fought against them and drove them back ; however it was a sore light.

16 Wilkinson, the chief captain, who went before the host of Columbia, had been sick many days, asd vms unable to go forth against them himself.


WAR. 133

17' So he sent some of his brave captains, even Boyd, and Swartwout, and Covington; and the en- gines of destruction were set to work with great noise and fury ; and the valiant Covington was wounded unto death.

18 Moreover, the loss of the men of Columbia that day was an hundred slain, and two hundred two score and ten wounded, and the loss of the king was about an hundred four score and one.

19 After this battle the army of Wilkinson moved along the St. Lawrence until they came to Barnheart's^ near Cornwall, wheve they met the valiant Brown.

20 Now this place lieth on the north side of the river, and on the other side lieth St. Regis, where Wilkinson, the chief captain, expected to be joined by the army of Hampton, from Champlain.

21 But in this he was disappointed ; for, lo ! Hamp- t »n sent one of his captains, whose name was Atkinson, to Wilkinson, with the tidings that he had declined to meet him, and was returning to his camp on the lake.

22 Now when the army of Wilkinson beard those things, they were discouraged; and all the plans that had been devised by Armstrong,* the chief captain, and scribe of the great Sanhedrim, were of no avail.

23 So the array of Wilkinson crossed the river again and came into the land of Columbia, at French Mills, near St. Regis; where they went into winter quar- ters.


  • Gen. Armstrong, Secretary at War,

m 2


434 LATE

24 And the men of Columbia, even the great Sanhe- drim, were disappointed in their expectations.

• 25 Moreover, Hampton received much blame in the thing ; and he was even taxed with the crime of drink ing too freely of the strong waters.

26 But the imaginary evils which the children of men commit are oftentimes graven in brass, whilst their actuaS good deeds are written in sand.

27 Neither shall it be forgotten here, that, when the shivering soldiers of Columbia were suffering with cold in the north,

28 The lovely and patriotic daughters of Columbia, blest with tenderness, remembered them, and sent them coverings for their hands and their feet :

29 Even from the fleece of their fathers' flocks, they wrought them with their own hands, and distributed them with a good heart.

30 And, for their kindness and humanity, the poor soldier blessed them, and their virtues were extolled by the men of Columbia throughout the land« 


• WAR, IBS


CHAP. XXXVIT.

Newark burnt — Fort George evacuated — Niagara frontier laid waste — Buffaloe burnt.


"AN the meantime, however, the strong vessels of Chauncey went out and brought Harrison, aud the romnant of his army, from Fort George to Sackett'i? Harbor, to protect the place.

2 But they left M'Clure behind, with the men under him ; being for the most part husbandmen, called militia, and volunteers.

3 And they were eager to be led on to the battle ; but the term for which their services were engaged hav- ing expired, they returned every man to his own house,

4 Se M'Clure, the chief captain of the fort, called a council of his officers, and they agreed to depart to the strong hold of Niagara.

5 And they took their destroying engines and the fclack dust, and the bread and meat of the army, and carried them across the river.

6 Likewise they put a lighted match to the black dust in the fort, and it was rent asunder with a great ■apise, as it were of thunder and an earthquake.


130 LATE

7 Moreover, they burnt the town of Newark, before they departed, which happened on the tenth day of the twelfth month.

8 Howbeit, they gave the inhabitants time to save themselves, before they put the burning torch to their dwellings ; nevertheless, it was an evil thing, and pleased not the people of Columbia.

9 1 he men of Columbia were not cruel, and thoy put none of the inhabitants of the town to the sword.

10 After this, it came to pass, on the nineteenth day of the same month, early in the morning, before the dawning of the day, about fifteen hundred of the savages and soldiers of the king crossed the river, and went a- gainst Niagara.

1 1 And they fell unawares upon the men of Columbia, while they were yet asleep in their tents ; and overcame them, and took the fort, and put the garrison to the sword ; even the women and children suffered under the savage tomahawk.

12 Now the people of Columbia, who were massacred that day, were about two hundred two score and ten.

13 But the captain of the hold, whose name was Leonard, was charged with the evil ; for he had left the fort, and neglected that duty which should ever be the pride of a soldier.

14 Nevertheless, when they had committed all this horrid slaughter, the barbarians were not fully glutted with murder ;

15 So they went against the little villages of Lewis- town, Manchester, Youngstown, and Tuscarora, and burnt them with fire, and slew the poor and helpless that dwelt round about the place.


WAR. 137

1$ After whieh, at the close of the year, they went against the beautiful village of Buftaloe, and burnt it -also j and made it a ruin and a desolation.


133 .LATE


CHAP. XXXVIII.


Cruise of the V. S. frigate Essex, D. Porter com- mandex — Jier defence and capture, at Valparaiso.


OW whilst the great lakes and rivers were bound in fetters of ice, and the arms of Columbia slumbered in the winter camps of the north ;

2 And whilst the conquering sword of Jackson spread ruin and desolation among the misguided savages of the south ;

3 Lo ! new scenes of warfare appeared upon the wa- ters of the great deep.

4 In the first year of the war David, whose sir- name was Porter, sailed from the shores of Columbia towards the south, that he might capture the vessels cf the men of Britain.

5 And the ship which he commanded was one of the strong vessels of Columbia, called the Essex.

6 Now David was a valiant man, and he had con- trived a plan to annoy the commerce of Britain in the waters of the great Pacific Ocean.

7 So, in process of time, he passed around the fur- thermost part of the land of Columbia, which is called Cape Horn, and lieth far to the south ; near the country of Patagonia, which is inhabited b}' the barbarians, and sailed towards the haven of Valparaiso.


WAR. 139

From whence, leaving Chili t© the south, he mov- ed along the coast of Peru, till he came to Lima, where it never rains :

9 A country where gold and silver are found in abundance, and where there is one continual summer, and the trees blossom throughout the year.

10 Again, he prepared his vessels, and sailed from Lima towards the north, until he fell upon the islands of Gallapagos ; called the enchanted islands.

11 Now these islands lie upon the west side of the great continent of Columbia, under a meridian sun, be- neath the girdle of the world.

12 Hereabouts he captured a multitude of the mer- chant ships of Britain, laden with rich merchandize, and silver as.d gold.

13 And he fixed-a score of the destroying engines into one of the ships he had taken ; and made her a fighting vessel, and called her Name "Essex Junior, and a man, whose name was Downs, he made captain thereof.

14 And he fell upon the fishermen of Britain, and captured those who went out to cau.Ii the mighty whales, which afford oil to give us light in the night time, and bones to shade our daughters from the scorch- ing sun of the noon-day. ,

15 Moreover, David went to an island where dwelt wild savages, and established himself, so that he could go out and return, whensoever he chose.

16 And when he departed from the island, which he called after the chief governor of the land of Columbia


140 LATE

in those days,* he left some of his men, with the weapons of war to defend the place.

17 Now David was a grievous thorn in the side of- Britain, and he almost destroyed her whole commerce

in the South Seas :

18 Inasmuch as he put the wise men of the king to

idieir wits end ; for they were unable to out-sail him and take him captive.

19 So they sent their strong ships- in search of him, bv two's, over the whole face of the waters of the Southern Ocean ; and the expense thereof would have made more than two feasts for the Prince Begent, wh& governed England in the name of his father.

20 However, it came to pass, that David returned again in his ship to the haven of Valparaiso ; and the vessel, called the Essex Junior, accompanied him.

21 Now Downs, who commanded her, had been t© the place before, and conducted die prizes of David there, and brought him the tidings that he was likely to be en- snared upon the waters.

22 So, whilst David was there, on the twenty-eighth day of the third month, in the eighteen hundred and fourteenth year of the Christian era,

23 He looked around, and behold ! he saw two of the strong ships of Britain approaching, for the purpose of hemming him in ; the one called the Phoebe, and the other the Cherub,

24 But his heart sank not within him, for he knew n@ cowardice ; but, with the wisdom of a brave maa,

- ■■ ' ■ ,i'

  • Madison Island.


WAR. 141

lie strove to escape, as the vessels were too powerful for him.

23 But the winds were adverse, and blew hard, and prevented thetacklings of his ship from taking effect :

26 Nevertheless, David said unto the captains of the king, Come singly, and not like cowards, upon me ; then shall ye receive the thunders of the freemen of Columbia abundantly ;

27 And her fame shall not suffer, although in the con- test ye may destroy my vessel upon the face of the wa- ters.

28 But Hillyar. the captain of the king's ship called the Phoebe, was afraid lest he should be overcome.

29 Now, when David found he was unable to make good his escape, he drew nigh the land, that he might be protected by the great law of nations ; for it was a place friendly to both parties.

30 But in this he was deceived; for the authorities of Spain trembled at the nod of the servants of Britain, in whom there was no faith.

31 So both vessels came upon him, like ravenous wolves, in the very haven of Valparaiso ; thus trans- gressjuo the law of nations, and committing an outrage which hath ftvv examples under the sun.

32 And th°y set their engines to work upon the Es= sex with all their might.

33 Nevertheless, David fought against them with desperation, for there was no hope left for him to es cape ; neither did he expect mercy.

34 \m\ he held cm for more than the space of two hours, when he became overpowered ; having his ship a sinking wreck, covered with blcod, and on fire ; witl*

N


jfe- LATE

about an hundred and fifty of his men slain and maim ed:

35 So, after David had fought hard, he became cap- tive to the ships of the king ; who had also some of then* men slain, and some wounded.

36 Moreover, Hillyar gave him praise and called him a man of courage ; for he fought against two strong •ships of Britain.

37 And David made a covenant with Hillyar, in which the Essex Junior was given unto him and his men, that they might return in her again to their own country.

38 And it came to pass, in the seventh month of the same year of the feattle, David arrived in the city of New- York ; having bejen absent about two years.

39 Now when the people of Columbia beheld the valiant Porter, they were rejoiced with exceeding great

oy ; inasmuch as they unharnessed the horses from be- fore his chariot, and drew him through the city.

40 And they made a sumptuous feast for him, and invited a multitude of guests j and spent the day in gla-d- siess and mirth.


WAR. liS


CHAP. XXXIX.

' zplure of the TJ. S. sloop of war Frolic, b$ the Bri- tish frigate Orpheus — capture of the British sloop of war L" Epervicr,bp the Peacock. Cant. Warring- ton — capture of the Reindeer, by the Wasp, Capt* Blukely — the Avon captured and sunk — U. S. ves* sels Syren and Rattlesnake captured — Admiral Cochrane declares the whole American coast ia e. state of blockade.


N« 


OW it happened on the twenty-first day of the fourth month of the eighteen hundred and fourteenth year, that one of the strong ships of the king, called the Orpheus ;

2 Being upon the waters of the great deep, fell in with a small vessel of the United States, called the Frolic, and made capture thereof.

3 However, in the same month, not many days after- wards, a fighting vessel of Columbia, called tire Peacock," commanded by the brave Warrington, met one of th© vessels of the king.

4 Now they were about equal in force ; and the name of the vessel of Britain was called L'Epervier and the captain's name was Wales.

5 And they sat the engines of destruction to work, $nd fought with great fury for the space of forty minutes- 1


144 LATE

G When the mariners of Columbia overcame the servants of the king, and the vessel of Britain struck her red-cross to the ship of Warrington.

7 And there were slain and wounded of the servants of the king about twenty and three; but there were none slain of the people of Columbia.

8 Moreover, Warrington gat about an hundred and twenty thousand pieces of silver, that were in the vessel.

9 And he received great praise throughout the land for this gallant exploit.

10 And the great Sanhedrim thanked him and gave him a medal of gold.

11 Likewise, the people of Savannah, a chief town in the state of Georgia, being a thousand miles to the south of New-York, honored him greatly.

1- For he had brought both vessels into their port; and 1 ere were much rejoicings ; and a rich feast was prepared for him by the people.

13 Moreover, it came to pass, on the twenty-eighth day of the sixth month, that one of the fighting s hips of Columbia, called the Wasp, met a Vessel of the ug, upon the ocean, called the I-'eindeer; after one oi the swift running animals of Columbia,

14 Now the W 7 asp was commanded by a man of courage, whose name was Blakely.

15 And a dreadful battle began; and the mischievous balls of destruction showered around with tremendous noise.

16 Nevertheless, Blakely ran down upon the Rein- deer, and in about twenty minutes he captured her.

17 But her captain was slain, and she was as it


WAR. 143

were a wreck upon the waters; so Blakely destroyed her.

18 The loss of the king, in killed and wounded that day, was about seventy and five ; and five of the men of Columbia were slain, and about a score maim- ed.

19 And the friends of the great Sanhedrim were pleased with the valiant acts of Blakely.

20 Moreover, on the twenty-seventh day of the eighth month;, the Wasp captured another ship of the king, called the Avon, and sunk her to the bottom of the great deep.

21 And the slain and wounded of the Avon, was two score and two.

22 Ilowbeit, about the same time, the Syren and the Rattlesnake* fell into the hands of the king.

23 About this time, the whole land of Columbia was ordered to be hemmed in by Cochrane, a servant of ■the king, and a chief captain of the navy of Britain.

24 But all their blockades were of no avail j for the men of Columbia escaped and outwitted them.


U. S. schooner and brig } about 14 guns each.


K 2


14C LATE


CHAP. XL.


Breaking up of the cantonment at French Mills — affair at La-Cole-Mill— Major Appling captures two hundred British seamen — Gen. Brown captures Fort Erie — battle of Chippawa plains.


OW it came to pass, in the second month of the same year in which David gat home to the United States,

2 That the armies of the north began to be in motion, and departed from the place called French Mills, where they were encamped.

3 And a part thereof moved towards Plattsburgh, on lake Champlain ; and was commanded by a brave man, whose name was Macomb, and Wilkinson, the chief captain, followed after them.

4 But the other part of the host, commanded by Jacob, whose sir-name was Brown, went to Sackett's Harbor; and from thence against the strong hold of Niagara.

5 And it was so, that when Wilkinson heard that Jacob had gone against Niagara; he marshalled out his force, and went against a place in the province of the king, called La-Cole-Mill, to take it.

6 Nevertheless, he failed, and lost man}' men; after which the command of the army was given, to a chief captain, whose name was Izard.


WAR. 147

  • ? In the meanwhile many of the evils of warfare

were committed on and about the waters of Ontario and the great lake Erie.

8 And a gallant captain, whose name was Appling.* took about two hundred of the mariners of the royal navy of Britain, at a place called Sandy-Creek, by the waters of lake Ontario : being in the same month that the strong hold of Oswego was taken by the men of Britain.

9 Now on the third day of the seventh month, it came to pass, that Jacob, the chief captain of the host of Columbia, on the borders of the river Niagara,

10 Having- prepared his men beforehand, crossed the river and captured fort Erie, and an hundred thirty and seven of the soldiers of the king, and some of the destroying engines ;

1 1 And the next day being the anniversary of the "independence of Columbia, after having left some of the men of war to defend the place,

12 He moved with his host towards the plains of Chippawa, where they rested for the night.

13 On the next day Jacob ^assembled his captains of fifties, and his captains of hundreds, and spake unto them, saying,

14 Lo ! the army of the king are mighty men of valor, and their numbers are great, even those who fought in Spain, under the banners of Welling-


  • Major Appling*


I4S LATE

ton,* the chief warrior of Britain ; and Riall, the chief captain of the host, is a man of great experi- ence :

15 Nevertheless, be not disheartened; but let us be- ware that we be not ensnared.

16 So he prepared his army to go against the host •of Britain, in battle array ; and the soldiers of Colum- bia shouted for the battle.

17 Now the army of Britain rested upon the plains of Chipnawa, and were ready to meet the army of Co- lumbia ; they shouted aloud, and inflamed their blood with the strong waters of Jamaica.

18 And they put fire to the black dust of the de- stroying engines; and a great noise issued from the mouths thereof.

19 Moreover, they vomited fire and smoke and brimstone incessantly, and with the movements of the armies the dust of the earth arose and overshadowed the field of slaughter.

20 And the heavy balls of iron whistled about-them in abundance.

21 However, the skill of Jacob, and his brave cap- tains, became manifest, and they drove the host of Bri- tain before them,

22 And compelled them to flee to their strong en- trenchments at Fort George and Fort Niagara.

23 And the field of battle was covered with the slain and the maimed ; even eight hundred men.

24 And the slain and wounded of the servants of the Heine' were about five hundred.


  • Lord Wellington,


WAR. t-49

23 So Jacob and his army gat great praise, ana a the warriors of Columbia that fought that day :

26 Amongst whom were the volunteers of the states of New- York and Pennsylvania, who were led on by the gallant Porter.*

27 And Ripley was there, and the brave Scott, who went out and fought in the heat of the battle.


Gens. Forier, Ripley, and Scott


LATE

CHAR XLL ' Battle of BrkJ^ewater.


OW about this time there was peace among the strong powers of Europe ; and the strength of Britain was free to be employed against the people of Colum- bia.

2 So she increased her navy on the shores of Co iumbia, and strengthened her armies in Canada; and .sent skilful men to conduct them and to fight her bat- tles :

3 And, in her spite, she emptied out the vials of hey vengeance upon the United States.

4 Notwithstanding, it came to pass, on the twenty fifth day of the same month,

5 That another bloody battle was fought hard by, at a place called Bridgewater, from whence ye might be- hold the stupendous water-falls of Niagara.

G There the army of Britain cams out against Jacob, with a host of five thousand chosen men,

7 Now the numbers of the host of Columbia were less than the host of the king, who were commanded by two chief captains, the one named Drummond,* and ihe other Riall ;

  • Gen. Drummond.


WAR. 151

8> Nevertheless, Jacob went out against them and gave them battle : and the army of Columbia shouted aloud 5 and the baitle waxed hot beyond measure.

9 And it lasted for the space of seven* hours ; even until the midnight.

10 The huge engines of destruction roared as the loud thunder, and the blaze thereof was like unto flash- es of lightning.

1 1 But it came to pass, that the army of Columbia drove the invincibles of Wellington from the field.

12 The valiant Miller, with his band, rushed upon the soldiers of the king, with the sharp points of his weapons of war, that faintly glittered in the light of the moon, and overcame them.*

13 Moreover, Drummond, the chief captain of the king, was wounded, and in danger of being made cap- tive ; and Riall, the chief captain, was taken and fell into the hands of the brave Jessup.f

14 And Jacob, the chief captain of the host of Co- lumbia, was sorely wounded ; and the brave Scott was wounded also.

15 However, this was a dreadful battle, fought ar- my against army, and blood and slaughter covered the green fields.

16 The loss of the king, was about a thousand and two hundred fighting men, who came to lose in the land of Columbia the honor they won in Europe.

  • Miller's brilliant charge on the enemy,

t Major Je$sup, of the 25th Reg,


Ii2 LATE

17 The loss of the men of Columbia was also very great ; being an hundred three score and ten slain, and more than five hundred maimed.

18 Now, as Jacob, the chief captain of the host of Columbia, was wounded, the charge was given to the valiant Ripley, and the army returned to the strong hold of Fort Erie.

19 And Jacob and his brave men gained great praise throughout the land of Columbia.


WAR. 253


CHAP. XLII.

Assault on Fort Erie, by the British, under Gen. Drummond — Gen. Brown resumes his command — sallies out of Fort Erie against the British camp — M* Arthur's expedition into Canada.


1 ja_ND it came to pass, on the fourth day of thf. next month, being the same day that the gallant Mor- gan, with two hundred and two score men, drove a thousand soldiers of the king from before Black Rock,

2 That a chief captain of Columbia whose name was Gaines,* anived from Sackett's Harbor at Fort Erie; and took the command thereof.

3 And it was so, that on the following day the army of the king approached towards the fort, and encamped themselves.

4 Moreover, they threw up breast-works and pre- pared their battering-rams, with intent to destroy the place, and make captives of the men of Columbia.

5 And on the fifteenth day of the month, after they hud prepared themselves, they rushed forth with all their might against the strong hold of Columbia.

6 And as their deeds were evil, they began in the dead of the night, when the bowlings of the wild wolf


  • Gen. Gaines.

O


154 LATE

are heard from afar, and the steady roar of distant wa- ter-falls, catches the ear of the drowsy centinel.

7 Lo ! it was a night dark and gloomy ; and the very clouds of heaven wept for the folly of man.*

8 Quickly did the weapons of murder disturb and trouble the general silence.

9 Their thunders roared around the battlements ; and the sudden blaze, from the engines, was as a thou- sand flashes of lightning.

1 But the men of Columbia were not asleep ; for they met them at the onset : thrice the men of Bi i- tain came; and thrice were they driven back.

11 About this time, a man of Columbia, who was sorely wounded, begged of an officer of the king that his life might be spared ;

12 But the captain, whose name was Drummond,t to whom he spake, refused him quarters; and, taking an oath, he swore, and cursed the men of Columbia, saying, Even as I slay thee, so shall it be with ye all.

13 Thus violating the commandment of God. which sayeth, Thou shalt do no murder.

14 But the hand of the Lord was stretched cut against him ; for while he was yet speaking, in the wickedness of his heart, he was smitten dead to the earth.

15 Now, although the men of Britain did some injury to the fort, they were quickly compelled to de- part.

  • It teas r rainy night.

v Col. Di'Utiimt>nd.


WAR. 155

lu And the slain aad wounded of the king that sight, were about seven hundred, besides two hundred captives.

17 The loss of the United States was about an hundred men.

18 Now it came to pass, on the seventeenth day of the next month, when Jacob was recovered of his v ounds, a;vJ had resumed his command, he sallied out of Fort Erie with his men, and went against the camp of the servants of the king.

19 And by his bravery and skill, and that of the valiant captains under him, he took and destroyed their strong holds, and slew many of them, so that their loss was about a thousand fighting men.

20 And the slain and wounded of Jacob's army were two hundred ninety and nine.

21 Now tiie valiant deeds of Jacob, and his brave men, are they not written in all the books of the chroni- cles of the land of Columbia of that day ?

22 After this, on the twenty-first day of the same month, the chief captain, and the host of Britain, being tired of the noise of the destroying engines of the men of Columbia, went away from the place and rested at Queenstown.i

23 About this time Izard, the chief captain, arriv- ed at Fort Erie, from Plattsburgh, and, as he was the oldest captain, he t jok the charge of the army of the north.

24 Daring these circumstances, it happened that the brave M' Arthur, who had remained at the strong hold of Detroit, to defend it,


156 KATE

25 Moved his army towards Burlington Heights, and went more than un hundred miles into the province cf Canada.

26 And the men of Columbia that went with him were valiant men. from the states of Kentucky and Ohio ,; in number about eight hundred.

27 Victory perched upon their arms, and they slew some of the servants of the king, and made many prisoners, and returned again with the loss of one man.

28 In the meanwhile, the army of Izard crossed the river and returned from Erie to the borders of Columbia, in the latter part of the year, and went into their winter «»mps at Buffalo.


WAR. 157


CHAP. XLIII.


Attack on Stonington, by the British ships of war which art defeated and driven of.


•N these days the strong powers of Britain strove hard to quench the fire of Columbian Liberty,

2 But it was lighted up by the hand of heaven, and not to be extinguished.

o Now it came to pass, on the ninth day of the eighth month of the same year,

4 That the niighty ships of Britain came and opened their thundering engines upon the little town of Ston- ingtoa, which lieth in the slate of Connecticut, in the east.

5 But the inhabitants of the place were bold and valiant men, and they scorned to make a covenant with the servants of the king.

G Although Hardy,* the chief captain of the king's ships had threatened to destroy the place ; saying, Re- move from the town your women and your children, who are innocent and fight not.

7 Thus shewing more righteousness than any of the


  • Coto T T>-hf, a cavtam undei Lord Nelson, at

the battle nf Trafalgar.


153 LATE

kingV'captains : albeit, he gave them only the space oi one hour to depart :

S So the men of Columbia let the destroying engines loose upon the vessels, and shot the yankee balls amongst them plentifully, and compelled them to depart :

9 Notwithstanding, they had but two of the destroy- ing engines in the place.

10 However, on the eleventh day of the same month, they were again forced to put them in motion.

1 1 For, in the meantime, Hardy had sent a messen- ger to the inhabitants, saying,

12 If ye will not prove wicked, and will refrain from sending your evil torpedoes amongst our vessels, then will we spare your town.

13 Now Hardy was mightily afraid of these torpe- does, (the history whereof is written in the fiftieth book of these chronicles) and he trembled at the sound of the name thereof.

14 Nevertheless, the people of Stonington refused his request.

15 So the ships of Britain came again and they brought another strong ship of the king to help them to take the place.

lG But once more the valiant sons of Connecticut made them fly for safety : and they came not again.

17 And the gallant conduct of the people of Ston- ington gained them much praise, even from the great Sanhedrim of the people.

18 Thus would the men of Columbia have done, in. many other places, but for the false words and wicked- ness of traitorous men.


WAR. 159


CflAP. XLIV.


Affairs in the Chesapeake — British army move up

the Patuxent — land and march towards the city

of Washington — prepare themselves for battle at Bladensburgh.


N,


OW the mighty fleet of Britain, that troubled the waters of the great Bay of Chesapeake, commanded by Cockburn the wicked, continued their depredations.

2 The number of their lighting ships were increas- ed, and the soldiers of the king had come thither in multitudes from the island of Britain.

3 For the war which she had waged against the mighty ruler of France,* was at an end ; and all their men of war were idle ; so they sent them against the men of Columbia, who slew them with terrible slaugh- ter.

4 Now the numbers of the servants and soldiers of the king, in and about the Chesapeake, were little fewer than ten thousand.

5 And they moved up the great river, which is called the Potowmac, and the river Patuxent, which lieth to the east thereof.

6 So, as they passed along, they did much damage^


  • Buonaparte.


16: LA'


CHAP. XLV<

Oajteurz of Wa&Mngton — Sucking of Alexandria— death of Sir Peter Parker.


N.


X ™ OW, when Ross, the chief captain, had done speaking, they sent forth their fire brands, and sat their destroying engines to work, and cast balls of destruc- tion and death.

2 Nevertheless, the men of Columbia were not dis- mayed, but poured out their thunders upon them in abundance.

3 And Joshua, sir-named Barney, who commanded the vessels of Columbia near the place, with bis brave men, went out upon the land, and fought against them with desperation.

4 Tor he had ordered his little fleet to be burnt with fwc } that the men of Britain might not profit thereby, and it blew up in the air with a loud noise.

5 Now Joshua was in the heat of the battle ; and his destroying engines slew the men of Britain on all sides : however, he was wounded and made captive.

6 llu! the servants of the king treated Joshua well, and honoured him for his bravery.

7 Now James, the chief governor, and the courisel- |pis, and the strikes of the great Sanhedrim, went out


war. i m

to see the battle, and to contrive for the safety of the city.

S And Munroe,* the chief scribe of the great Sanhedrim, was there ; and Armstrong,! and many other friends of the land of Columbia.

9 Nevertheless, the wisdom of all their plans failed them ; and they were sorely grieved to behold the hus- bandmen and the army of Winder, the chief captain, flee before the host of Britain.

10 But they were misled in their calculations ; and they were now unable to prevent the evil.

IX Neither did the men of war they counted upon arrive in time to catch the army of the king.

12 Therefore, the host of Columbia fled, and went beyond the city, and passing through Georgetown, rested at a place called Montgomery Court-house.

13 And the slain and maimed of the king, were about four hundred : those of the men of Columbia about two score.

14 Now it was about the going down of the snn, when the host of the king polluted the Citadel of Free- dom, and with their unhallowed footsteps violated the Temple of Liberty.

15 And Cockburn and Ross Jed the savage band of Britain into the midst of the city.

lo And the men of Columbia gnashed their teeth. ^ i

/si the

  • Hon, James Munroe, then Sccry of StatHi

t Gen Armstrong.


  • <: LA-


CHAP. XLV*

Capture of WasJiiiigton — Sacking of Alexandria — death of Sir Peter Parker.


OW, when Ross, the chief captain, had done speaking, they sent forth their fire brands, and sat their destroying engines to work, and cast balls of destruc- tion and death.

2 Nevertheless, the men of Columbia were not dis- mayed, but poured out their thunders upon them in abundance.

3 And Joshua, sir-named Barney, who commanded the vessels of Columbia near the place, with his brave men, went out upon the land, and fought against them with desperation.

4 For he had ordered Ids little fleet to be burnt with fire, that the men of Britain might not profit thereby, and it blew up in the air with a loud noise.

5 Now Joshua was in the heat of the battle ; and his destroying engines slew the men of Britain on ah sides : however, lie was wounded and made captive.

6 B'ul the servants of the king treated Joshua well, and honoured him for his bravery.

f Now James, the chief governor, and the courisel- lois, and the scribes of the great Sanhedrim, went out


WAR. ; &

to see the battle, and to contrive lor the safety of the city.

8 And Mimroe,* the chief scribe of the great Sanhedrim, was there ; and Armstrong,! and many other friends of the land of Columbia.

9 Nevertheless, the wisdom of all their plans failed them ; and they were sorely grieved to behold the.hus- bandmen and the army of Winder, the chief captain, flee before the host of Britain.

10 But they were misled in their calculations ; and they were now unable to prevent the evil.

H Neither did the men of war they counted upon arrive in time to catch the army of the king.

12 Therefore, the host of Columbia fled, and went beyond the city, and passing through Georgetown, rested at a place called Montgomery Court-house.

13 And the sjain and maimed of the king, were about four hundred : those of the men of Columbia about two score.

14 Now it was abGut the going down of the son, when the host of the king polluted the Citadel of Free- dom, and with their unhallowed footsteps violated the Temple of Liberty.

15 And Cockburn and Ross led the savage baud of Britain into the midst of the city.

Io An J the men of Columbia gnashed their teeth, n &~

ysf the


  • II m. James Munroe. then Sec'ry of State)

t Gen Armstrong.


1.&) LATE

bit their lips with vexation; for the thing 'might have been prevented.*

1 7 Nevertheless, it proved a blessing ; for it united the people of Columbia as one man, against the tyrants of the earth.

1 8 Now the place that had been pitched upon to build the chief city, was- in a fine country, and a beau- tiful spot, in the District of Columbia.

19 But the inhabitants round about the City of Washington were few; for they had, as it were, just > ;gan to build it.

20 There was much ground laid out for the city, bui the buildings therein were not many ; neither was it foitified.


  • Wliatever may be individual sentiment, it has been,

and still is the opinion of the best informed, that there teas sufficient time to have had the place entrenched and fortified, if necessary, with an hundred pieces of cannon; end at least to have kept the enemy at bay, until a sufficient force were assembled to have cut off his retreat. But to expect raw militia to meet and re- pulse, in an open plain, solid columns of regular troops, superior in numbers as well as discipline, must be preposterous. Who is to blame in the business we pre- ume not to say ; but hope a recurrence of the evil yiy be provided against in future. Had the s<tme en- i/ and industry been exercised at the city of If'ash- L on, that were displayed by the patriotic citizens of rnb-York) in erecting fortifications for the dffence of cir capital, we might have been spared the >nortifi~ [ition that followed the capture of the scat (f govem- ent.


WAR: 165

21 Sir when the servants of the king came to the place, they looked around, in surprise, and cried out' with astonishment, saying,

22 Lo ! the city hath fled with the people, for there arc but an handful of houses in the place.

23 However, the next day they began the work of destruction, like unto the barbarians of ancient times ; for their wickedness followed after them as the shadow followeth after the substance.

24 And they destroyed the beautiful edifices with fire, even the palace of the great Sanhedrim.

25 Now Cockburn was loath that his wicked deeds should! be handed down to future generations ; so he- went and destroyed, with his own hands, the chie* printing-office* of the city, and scattered the type*. abroad ;

26 Because, as he alledged, the printer had, in timea past, uttered many hard things against him.

27 Thus did he, even Cockburn, like an ignorant savaje, stamp Ins own name with infamy, and make it become a reproach amongst all mankind.

28 Science and learning blushed at the champions of England, who had been represented as the bulwark of religion; but who were, in reality, the supporters of idolatry ; the staff of Juggernaut, the false god of In- dia.

29 Now the art of printing was not known among the ancients ; for it was invented in these latter days ^ even in the fourteen hundred and fortieth year of the Christian era.


Office of the National Intelligencer,


jfS6 ' I»AT£

30 It was the helpmate of Freedom, and when die Tight which it spread burst forth upon the world, it be-> gan to open the eyes of man, and to destroy the poison- ous weeds that choaked the growth of Liberty.

31 Moreover, to complete the vandalism of Cock-< burn and Ross, they fell upon the printed books of the great Sanhedrim.

- 3*2 Even those that had been gathered together for instruction ; the toil of many years ; containing the learning and wisdom of ages.

33 And they consumed them with fire ; thus striving - "*> torn man back to the ages of ignorance and dark- ness;

34 Now, Thomas, whose sir-name wa3 Jefferson, who had been a scribe in the days of Washington, and a chief governor in the land of Columbia, in times - past-; araanvwhom the people esteemed for his vir- tue ;

35 Wherr he heard of their wickedness ; how, sa-~ SFage-like, they had burnt the books, which had been written by the wise men of the earth, and preserved &om the beginning to that day ;

36 In the goodness of his heart, he wrote unto the- great Sanhedrim, when they were assembled together, saying :

37 Since, like the barbarians of old, whose ignoj rasee might plead for them, the servants of the king- dom of Great Britain have laid waste your chief city, and made it a desolation,

36 And have trampled upon science, mutilated the monuments of art and industry, destroyed the archives of your natron^ and burnt your books- with fire ;


-WAR. 157

-39 For yotrr benefit, and for tie benefit of my coun- try, I will give unto you my whole Library, which £

Jiave selected with care, from my youth upwards ; and whatever in your judgment shall be the value thereof,

-that win I accept.*

40 I am well stricken in, years, and must shortly sleep with my fathers ; but the last wish of my heart

. shall be the welfare op my country.

41 Now Thomas was a Philosopher, and a man of great learning, and he had abundance of books of all

-nations, and in all languages, even ten thousand vo- lumes.

42 So die great Sanhedrim accepted the offer o^ Thomas, and they retain the books to this day.

43 Now it came to pass, in the evening of the same day, on which the vandals of Britain set fire to

' the city, that the army of the king fled from the place ; for the air of Liberty is poison to the followers of ty- rants.

44 Moreover, the}' left some of their slain and , wounded behind, for they were afraid of being caugk„

in a snare by the husbandmen of Columbia.

45 So they went down to the river and gat into their vessels from whence they came.

46 In the meantime, the inhabitants of Alexandria, •a town which lieth to the south of the chief city, on the

-river Potowmac, in the state of Virginia,


  • Mr. Jefferson left it to Congress to pioJce him tehf

compensation they thought proper for his Library-


108 LATE

47 Being smitten with fear, sent to Cock'burn and Ross, entreating that they might be spared, if, pen-.I-

'■ venture, they made a covenant in good faith with them, and surrendered themselves.

48 And the chief captains of Britain agreed to the capitulation of the town, and to vouchsafe its protec- tion.

49 But the people suffered for their foolish confi- dence ; and no one pitied them ; for it was of their

' own seeking.

50 So it happened, after they had trusted to the faith of the servants of the king; Gordon, a captain of the ships in the river Potowmac, came up against

Mill cm before the town 5

51 And took their merchant ships ; and compelled the people to open their store-houses, and put into the

».V*3Jcls their flour, even sixteen thousand barrels, and their wine: and their cotton, and a thousand hogsheads of the sweet-scented plant.

52 So the robbers of the king took them away, sack- ed the town, and laughed at the people thereof, for trusting to the faith of British honour.

i 53 However, as they passed along down the rivtr, -.vuh their ill-gotten treasure, lo ! the ships of Britain were assailed, and nigh being destroyed :

54 For Rogers, and Perry, and Porter, three va- liant captains of the navy of Columbia, gave them hindrance and annoyed them greatly:

55 Perry and Porter raised fortifications upon the borders «f the river, ..and put therein the destroying


WAR. 169

engines, which , when the vessels came nigh by, they let loose upon them abundantly, and wounded them in their tackling, and slew numbers of their men.

56 Moreover, the balls which the engines vomited forth, were red and hot from the. mouth of the fiery furnace.

57 Meanwhile, Rogers sent his fire-ships among them to destroy them as they fled; nevertheless they escaped.

58 Now about this time, being the thirtieth day of -the same month, Peter, whose sir-name was Parker,

who commanded a strong ship of the king, was com- mitting many depredations along the shores of the Ches- apeake ;

59 So Peter essayed to go, in the night-time, sgainst some of the husbandmen of Columbia, commanded by .the gallant Reid,* about the borders of the state of Ma- ryland ;

60 And when he had landed his men of war, he went out after the husbandmen, and the plunder ; but they were upon the watch, and fell upon him, and killed and maimed about two score, and were nigh mak- ing captives of them all ; and Peter was amongst the slain.

61 Now when the news of thetaking of the chief city of Columbia, and the sacking of Alexandria was


  • Cff? Reid, of the militia.

J 2


170 LATE

received in Britain, at first the people rejoiced, saying, 'Now, forsooth, have we conquered these cunning Yan- kees!

62 But afterwards they became ashamed, and hid their faces ; for they had heard the judgment of the -^surrounding nations, by whom their vandalism was condemned.*


• A number of well written articles were publish sd } not only in the papers of France and Germany ', ibut even in England, in which this scandalous imita- tion of the conduct of the Goths and Sandals was very severely reprehended.


WAR. m


CHAP. XLV1.

^-British wider Gen. Prevost, go against PlattsfatrgK — Com. Macdonough captures the British squadron on Lake Champlain


Jl\ EVERTHELESS, if difficulties and disasters befel the people of Columbia in the south, lo! there was a wreath of laurels weaving for them in the north.

2 Behold ! a mighty army of the king had assem- bled together at the village of Champlain, between Plattsburgb and Montreal ; nigh unto the place where Forsyth the warrior, the second Sumter,* was slain ;

3 For the Prince Regent had commanded his ser- vants to go forth into the heart of the land of Coium-


  • Sumter, a brave officer in the American Revolu-

tion, similar in character to Forsyth.

The folloioing lines were suggested to the mind of the writer, by viewing Hip spot where the remains, of the gallant Forsyth lie interred. On the 28th of June, 1814, this enterprising officer made an incursion into Canada as far is Odiestown, where an affair took place with a detachment of the enemy from the Port of La Cole. After killing seventeen of their number ; Forsyth recieved a wound- in the neckofwhichf ke disd


172 LATE

bja, and separate the states of the east from the rest of the country.

4 -So it came to pass, about the fifth day of the ninth month, that the host of Britain appeared before the village of Pittsburgh ; which lieth about three hundred miles from New- York, towards the north.

5 Now Prevost, the governor of Canada, was the eommander of the army ; and the number of his men of war tvas about fifteen thousand.

6 And they began to prepare their battering rams, their bombs, and their rockets, and all kinds of instru- ments of destruction ; and they entrenched themselves round about.

7 Now the strong hold of Plattsburgh was hard by ; and the barve Macomb was the chief captain of


in a few days after, and was buried, tviih military ho^ ,%ors, at Chumplain.

Stop, traveller, stay — view well the ground

Where Forsyth fought and bled ; Mark well the spot, for yonder mound. Contains the valiant dead.

No cold neglect could check his zeal,

His Country was his pride, And fighting for that Country's weal,

The hero nobly died !

No tomb-stone marks the dreary spot.

Where sleeps the wirrioi- brave ; His fame, his actions, quite forgot, A.nd buried in his "rave.


•WAR. 173

tluvhold ; and "the number 'of his men was about fifteen -hundred ; being in the proportion of one Yankee to. ten invincibles.

8 Howsoever, the valiant 'husband noted of the states of Vermont and ISew-York, called- militia, commanded by Mooers, a man of great courage, assembled together, to assist in the defence of the place, on the borders of the river Saranac, which emptieth its waters into lake Champlain.

9 In the meantime, Downie, the chief captain of the fleet of Britain upon the lake, had prepared himself to assist Prevost on a certain day appointed,

10 When he was to come out against the fleet of . Columbia, which was commanded by the gallant Mac-

donotigh.

11 Accordingly, it came to pass, on the appointed day, being the eleventh of the ninth month, in the «ne thousand eight hundred and fourteenth year of . the Christian -era, (

12 And three hundred and sixty-five days after 011- • ver had captured the king's fleet on the waters of Erie,

13 That the strong vessels of Britain appeared, with their sails spread, moving upon the bosom of lake Champlain, coming against the fleet of Columbia.

14 Now it was in the morning, about the ninth hour, when Macdonough beheld the fleet of Britain sailing boldly towards him.

15 And it was so, that the vessels of Columbia were safely moored in the bay of Pittsburgh, where they waited the approach of the enemy; who were the strongest in numbers, and in their engines of djatb.


ft JA -LATE

16 However, when they were about a furlong off. 'they cast their anchors, and set themselves in battle ar- ray, squadron against squadron.

17 Now the sound of the battle-drum was heard along the lake, and the brave mariners shouted aloud ior the fight.

18 Then began their destreying engines to utter their voices, and it was like unto the voice of mighty thun- ders.

19 And the same hour, the armies on the shore.be- . ganthe dreadful battle with their roaring engines.

20 So that on the land and on the waters the fire and smoke were abundant, and the noise thereof was tre- mendous beyond measure.

21 And the battle waxed hot, and the vessels of Downie fought bravely against the vessels of Macdon- ough :

22 Nevertheless, the Lord of hosts favored the men of Columbia, and they overcame the servants of the king.

23 For in about the space of three hours, the vja- liant Macdonough and his brave men, captured the whole fleet of Britain, save a ievf gun-boats, that made good their escape.

24 Now the killed and wounded of the king's fleet, were an hundred ninety and four ; and Downie, the chief captain, was amongst the slain.

25 Moreover, the number of the captives of, the men of Britain was about four hundred.

26 Now Macdonough was a good man, neither was he fill of boasting and vaiu-glory : he arrogated .to


WAR. 175

himself no praise en account of his success, but ascribed the victory to the pleasure of the Almighty.

27 And as it is written, in the word of the Lord,

Do UNTO ALL MEN AS YE WOULD? THEY SHOULD DO-

unto you, so he took care of the prisoners, and em- ployed skilful physicians to bind up the wounds of tfr& maimed.

28 Then were the children of Columbia exceedingly rejoiced ; yea, their hearts were made glad ; and they praised Macdonough for his noble deeds.

29 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim honored him ; and a piece of land, which overlooketh the kike, was. given unto him, for an inheritance^

30 That, in his old age, and when he was well stricken in years, he might remember with joy the strength of his youth, and smile upon the spot, where fleet to fleet, he triumphed . over the enemies of free- ' dom ;

3 1 And where his children's children might point-. and say, Tt was there the guardian angel of Co- lumbia permitted our father to humble the pride e$ Britain.


m LATE'


CHAP. XLVIT.


I


Mttik of Plattstiurgh — defeat of Sir George Fne- vost,


Jc^rOW while Macdonough was capturing the royai' fleet of Britain, upon the lake, the gallant Macomb scattered destruction amidst the army of Prevost. ) 2 Ami the battle raged with great violence, and the men of Britain strove hard to pass over the river called Saranac ;

3 But the men of war of Columbia, who were upon the opposite side of the water, opposed them, and slew ihem with gredt slaughter.

4 And the brave Grosvenor, and Hamilton, an ! Riky, and the gallant Cronk, drove them back fiom crossing the bridges.

5 Likewise, many were slain in the river, so that the waters of the Saranac were dyed with the blood of the servants of the king.

6 But Macomb kept the engines at work ; and Brookj, and tiichards, and Smith, who were in the forts, displayed much valor, and caused the engines to vomit fire and smoke, and balls of heavy metal.

7 Howsoever, when Prevost saw that the king's fleet was captured, he began to be disheartened, and his* whole army was amazed.


WAR. 177

& Notwithstanding this, they continued to cast their balls, and their rockets, and their bomb-shells, and their sharpnells, with all their might.

9 Now these sharpnells were unknown even to the- children of Columbia, for they were lately invented by the wise men of Britain.

10 But the people of Columbia trusted in the. strength of their arms, more than in the strength ci- these shells, so they used them not.

11 Nevertheless, the army of the king fought hard^ with their battering-rams, against the strong hold of Co- lumbia, until the setting of the sun, when their noises were silenced by the brave band of Columbia.

12 So the same night, Prevost, and the invincibles of the king, fled towards the strong hold of Montreal ; leaving their sick and wounded behind to the mercy of the men of Columbia; destroying their provisions, which in their haste they could not carry away.

13 And the men of Columbia followed them a little way, and slew some, and made many captives.

14 Thus were the men of war of Britain conquered in the north, army against army, fleet against fleet, and squadron against squadron.

15 And the killed and wounded of the army of the king that day, were about a thousand men ; and about three hundred who were tired of their bondage, left the service of the king,* and joined the banners of the great banned rim.

16 Now Macomb received much praise for his bra°

  • Deserters.

Q


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very ; and his name shall be remembered by ages yet an-' bora.

17 Moreover, he spake well of all the officers and ra6n who" fought with him.

18 And Mooers, who commanded the brave husband- men of New- York and Vermont, and Strong, the valiant chief captain of the men called volunteers, had great honor for their noble deeds.

19 Likewise, Appling, and Wool, and Leonard and Sproul, distinguished themselves among the brave.

20 But when the news of the capture of the fleet, and the defeat of their mighty army, reached the lords of Britain, they put their fingers in their ears, that they might not hear it.

21 Neither would they believe it ; but when they found it wets so of a truth, they were enraged out of measure.

22 And their wise men and their counsellors said, Lo! we have only been trifling with these Yankees ; now let us send forth a mighty fleet and an army to over- whelm them.


WAH, W9


CHAP. XLVIII.

Attack on Bultimorc, by the British army, wrier Gen, Rons, and thefieet under Admirals Cochrane an$ .Cockburn.


N<


OW when Ross and Coekburn returned from their burning and pillaging, and all the barbarities they com- mitted at Washington, the chief city, and the neighbor- hood thereof;

2 Emboldened by the success of the,ir unrighteous xleeds, they gathered together their army and their navy, and essayed to go against the city of Baltimore, which lieth in the state of Maryland ;

3 That they might commit the like wickedness, in which they .had taken so much pleasure at Hamptoij, Jlavre-de-grace, and Washington.

4 But they had a mightier place than Washington to go against ; for Baltimore is a great city, containing therein about fifty thousand souls, and the people had ep.r trenched it round about, and made it a strong place.

5 So U came to pass, the next day after Macdonough had captured the fleet of Britain, on lake Champlain, being the twelfth day of the ninth month,

-6 That their vessels and transports came to a piace called North Pojat, which lieth at the mouth of the river


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Petapsco, about an hundred furlongs from the city, and began to put their men of war upon the shore.

7 And the number of their chosen fighting men, who were landed, were about eight thousand.

8 And when they were all moved out of the boats^ Ross, the chief captain, conducted them on towards the city.

9 As they moved along their instruments of war glit- tered in the beams of the sun ; and the waving of their squadrons was like unto the troubled waters of the

ocean.

10 However, when they came to a place called

Bear Creek, lo ! the army of Columbia met them in bat? tie array.

11 For, when the gallant young men of Baltimore heard the rumor, that;the soldiers of Britain were com- ing upon them ;

12 With 'the spirit of freemen, they grasped their weapons of war in their hands, and went out to meet 'hem without fear ; resolved to conquer or to die.*

13 For well they knew, that life would be a burthen to them, when their habitations were consumed with fire ■; their parents slaughtered j and the innocence of their wives and sisters violated.

14 Now the name of the chief captain of the army of Columbia was Samuel, whose sir-name was Smith :t a valiant man, who had fought in the days of Washington^ and gained much honor,

1 ■ ■ ■■ *t

  • Although it may be said the British were net nan*

quered ; yet they were defeated.

Qev, Smith.


War, m

15 Moreover, Samuel was a man well stricken in years, and he had many brave captains under him 3 eVen Strieker, and Stansbury, aud Winder were with trim.

16" New it was somewhat after the mid-day when the engines of destruction began their roaring noises :

U And the fire and smoke were vomited forth out of their mouths, so that the light of the sun was hid- den by the moans of the black clouds 'that filled the air,

1 8 And their rockets, and all their instruments of death, which the sons of men have employed their un- derstandings to invent, were used abundantly.

19 Now the battle waxed hot, and the gallant Striek- er, and his brave men, fought hard : and it was a dread= ful fight,

20 Inasmuch as the slain and wounded of the king that day, were about four hundred ; and the loss of the men of Columbia was two hundred.

21 Moreover, Ross, the chief captain of the host e«£ "Britain, was amongst the slain ; a boy, who had accom- panied his father to battle, had taken dreadful aim at Ross, with his riile, and killed him :

22 And the people of Columbia grieved only .be- cause it was not Cockburn the wicked, who had fallen 5 for ft man, whose name was O'Boyle, had offered five hundred pieces of silver for each of his ears.

23 Nevertheless, the men ef Columbia were not powerful enough to overcome the servants of the king.; so they drew back into their entrenchments, and strong holds, that were upon the high places round about the city.

Q 2


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24 And Rogers, aud Findley, and Harris, and Stiles were among the captains of the strong holds ; and were all faithful men.

25 But it came to pass, the next day, when the men of Britain saw that the men of Columbia were well prepared for battle, Hhat they were afraid to go against the strong holds.

26 So in the middle of the night, which was dark and rainy, they depai ted from the place, and returned to their vessels, that they might escape the evil that was preparing for them.

27 Moreover, they took the dead body of Ross, their chief captain, with them, and cast it into a vessel, filled with the strong waters of Jamaica ;

28 That the instrument of their wickedness might be preserved, and conveyed to the king, their master, and be buried in his own country.

29 Now it came to pass, in the meantime, that Cochrane, and Cockburn the wicked, the ^hief captain, of the mariners of the king, sailed up the river Petap- sco, towards the strong hold of Fort M'Henry, to as- sail it

30 Now the strong hold of M'Henry Iieth about fif- teen furlongs from the city ; and.the name of the chief captain thereof was Armistead, aman of courage : al- beit, he was sick,

31 And when the strong vessels of the king drew irigh unto the fort, they cast their rockets and their

v bomb-shells into it plentifully ^ and strove Jiard to drive the men of Columbia away-


WAR. 13S

32 But the gallant Armistead let the destroying en- gines loose up«n them without mercy ; and they cast out their thunders, winged with death, among the ser- vants of the king. -

33 The loud groans of their wounded floated upon the waters, with an awful horror that shocked the @*r of humanity.

34 And it -was so, that when Cockburn found he -could not prevail against the strong hold, he also depart- ed from the river, neither came they against the place any more.*


  • One cf the gallant defenders of Fort M' "Henry-

has celebrated this circumstance in deathless verse, His voetry is so exquisite, and his descriptions so pa- thetic, that we cannot resist the pleasure of presenting his stanzas to cur readers.

The Star-Spangled Banner.

■ ■O ! say, can you see, by the dawn's early light,

What so proudly we hail'd.at the twilight's last gleaming, "Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the peri- lous fight, O'er the ramparts we watch'd were. so gallantly streaming ? And the rocket's red glare > the bombs bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there ; O! say, does that star spangled banner yet wav§, O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave"?


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35 Now when the men of Columbia heard that Ross, the chief captain of the king, was slain, and the host of Britain was compelled to flee from before the city, they were exceedingly rejoiced.


On the shore dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe'5 naughty host in dread sdence re- poses^ What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep. As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses ? Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam, In mil glory reflected now shines on the stream.

? Tis the star-spangled banner, O ! long may it wave ©'er the land of thf free and the home of the brave. And where is that ban'] wlio so vauntin^ly swore

That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion, A home and a country, should leave us no more !

Their blood has wash'd out their foul footsteps' pol- lution. No refuge could save the hireling and slave, From the terror of flight or the gloom of tiie grave, And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth

wave, O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave. ©.! thus be it ever when freemen shall stand,

Between their lov'd home, and the war's desolation. Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the Heaven rescu'd land, Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation ! Then coaquer we must, when our cause it is just, And this be our motto — " In God is our trust ;•"' And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall

wave O'er the land of the free, and thelioaie of the brave


-WAR. 185

36 And the brave defenders of Baltimore had great praise and honor given them throughout the land.

37 And the names of those who fell in the contest? are they not written on the monument which the grati- tude of the people of BaUimwe erected to the memory Of its defenders ?


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CHAP. XLIX.

Destruction of the privateer Gen. Armstrong, Sam- uel C.Read, captain-~Scorpion and Tigress cap- tured — U. S. frigate Adams burnt — Castine—' Fort Boyer attached — destruction of the pirates at Barrataria, by Com. Patterson — Gen Jackson captures Bensacola, and returns to New Orleans,


N<


OW the loud and frightful noise of war sounded mpon the bosom of the great deep ; and the shores of Columbia knew no peace.

2 The dreadful clangor of arms rung upon the land, and echoed from the mountains ; and the groans of suffer- ing victims floated in the air of heaven.

3 But the Lord favored the people of Columbia, and their armies and their navy gained strength, and prosperity was showered upon them : the voice of war became familiar to those who where strangers to it in times past,

4 Now on the twenty-sixth day of the ninth month, be- ing in the thirty and ninth year of American Indepen- dence,

5~ It came to pass, that a certain private armed ves- -sel of the people of Columbia, called the General Armstrong, commanded by Samuel,, whose sir-jiamf -was Read,


WAR. 187

6 Had cast her anchors in the haven of Fayal, an island in the sea, which lieth towards the rising sun, dbout two thousand miles from the land of Columbia ;

7 A place where, two score and ten years ago, there Was a mighty earthquake ; and where poisonous reptiles' never dwell.

8 And it was about the dusk of the evening when Samuel saw a number of the strong vessels of Britain- hemming him in : so he drew nigh to the shore for safety, for the place was friendly to both powers.

9 Nevertheless, the boats from the vessels of the king went against Samuel to take his vessel ; but with his weapons of war he drove them off and slew numbers of them, so that they were glad to escape to- their strong ships.

10 However, they quickly returned with a greater Humber of boats, and about four hundred men ; and Sa- muel saw them, and prepared to meet them.

1 1 The silver beams of the moan danced upon the gently rolling waves of the ocean, and the sound of the oar again broke the sweet silence of night.

12 But, when they came nigh the vessel of Samuel, the men of Columbia poured out destruction upon them with a plentiful hand 5

13 Inasmuch as they were again compelled to de- part to their strong vessels with dreadful loss.

14 However, about the dawning of the day, one of the strong vessels, called the Carnation, came against the vessel of Columbia, and let her destroying engines loose with great fury.

15 Now Lloyd, who commanded the Plantagenet


I8B* t-ATE

Was the chief captain of the king, in the place ; and h£- violated tlie law of nations.

16 So. when Samuel saw that the whole fleet of- Britain were bent on destroying h;3- vessel, in defiance of the plighted honor of nations, he ordered her to be sunk.

IT -After which he and his brave mariners deserted ner, and went upon the shore; and the servants of the sing came- and burnt her with fire in the neutral port of tfayal.

18 Nevertheless, they, received the reward of their unrighteousness, for much damage was done to their vessels, and' their slain and wounded were two hundred two score and ten.

.19 Of the people of Columbia two only were slain and seven maimed ! !

20 And the valiant deeds of Samuel gained him a name amongst the brave men of Columbia.

21 Now, in the same month, the Scorpion and the figress, two fighting vessels of Columbia, on lake Hu- ron, were captured by the men of Britain*

22 Likewise, about this time, there were numerous other evils that befel the sons of Columbia;

23 Inasmuch as a brave captain, whose sir-name was Morris, was obliged to consume his ship with fire, lest she should fall into the hands of the enemy ; and she was called the Adams.*

24 Now this was at a place called Castine, which was forcibly occupied by the strong ships of Britain,


U. S-. frigate Adami.


WAR. 189

aad lieth to the east, in the District of Maine : more- over, it became a watering place for the servants of the king.

25 But when James, the chief governor, and the great Sanhedrim, knew thereof, they sent word to the governor, and offered him soldiers to drive them from tfte borders of Columbia ;

26 But, lo ! the governor, even Caleb the Strong, refused bis aid, for he was afraid of the wrath of the kiug of Britain.*

27 (Now Caleb, in the Hebrew tongue, signifieth a dog ; but, verily, this dog was faithless.)

28 Moreover, it came to pass, about the same time } that the strong hold of Fort Boyer, being at a plaee called Mobile-point, was attacked by the strong ships of Britain.

29 Now Mobile had lately been the head quarters and the resting-place of the army of Jackson the brave ;

30 But the enemies of Columbia had become tumul- tuous at a place called by the Spaniards, Pensacola, whither he had departed to quell them ;

3 1 So that the fort was defended by only a handful of men, commanded by the gallant Lawrence.

32 And the names of the vessels of the king, tha£ assailed the fort, were the Hermes, the Charon, and the Sophie, besides other fighting vessels j which open- ed their fires upon the strong hold.

33 Nevertheless, Lawrence was not dismayed, al-


  • See tke letter of Sec Monroe, and Strong's answer.


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though Woodbine,*' the white savage,- came in his' rear, with one of the destroying engines and a howitzer, an instrument of Satan, and about two hundred savages.

34 So when Lawrence let his engines of death loose upon them, and had showered the whizzing balls amongst them, for about the space of three hours, they fled.

35 And the slaughter on board the ships was dread- M ; and about three hundred of the men of Britain were slain, and the Hermes was blown out of the wa- ter into the air With an awful noise.

36 The loss of the people of Columbia that day ? was four slam and five maimed.

37 About this time a band of sea-robbers and pi- rates, who had established themselves upon the island <af Barrataria, were committing great wickedness and iepredations j and were ready to assist the men of Britain.

38 But a valiant man, called Daniel, sir-named Patterson, went against them with his small fighting vessels,! and scattered them abroad, and took their vessels, and destroyed their petty establishment of sea- j'obbery.

39 Now it came to pass, when Jackson heard thai; Tensacola, the capital of West-Florida, had become a resting-place for the enemies of Columbia ; and that the men of Britain occupied the place,- and had built ihem a strong hold therein :


  • The eekhrated Capt. Woodbine, of the British nav^

t Gun-beats,


WAR. 19 i.

40 From whence they sent forth the weapons of war, and the black dust among the savages, to destroy the people of Columbia ; and that the servants of the king of Spain were afraid to prevent the wickedness thereof ;

41 Behold ! he, even Jackson, went out against the place with a band of five thousand fighting men, the brave sons of Tennessee and other parts of Columbia.

42 And it was early in the morning of the seventh day of the eleventh month, when the host of Columbia appeared before the walls of Pensacola.

43 And immediately Jackson sat the engines of de> struction to work j and the smoke thereof obscured the

44 Now when the governor Of the place JhearJ the noise of the engines of death and the clashing of arms^ he was smitten with fear ;

45 Insomuch that Jackson, the chief captain, wh» with his army had encompassed the place, quickly compelled him to surrender the town, and beg for mer- cy j which was granted unto him and his people, evea the Spaniards.

46 Now when the men of Britain saw this, they put the match to the black dust in their strong hold, and it rent the air with a tremendous noise.

47 After which they fled from the land into their strong ships, that were in the haven of Pensacola.

48 And Jackson, having accomplished his purpose, .returned with his army, in triumph, to the city of Ney,>

£Means, on the second day of the twelfth czoutk


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CHAP. L.

Steam-boats — Fulton — torpedoes — attempt to blow up the Plantagenet — kidnapping Joshua Penny.


N<


OW, it happened that, in the land of Columbia, there arose up wise and learned men, whose cunning kad contrived and invented many useful things.

2 Among these there appeared one whose ingenuity was PTrceedinriy great^ inasmuch as it astonished all the inhabitants of the earth :

3 Now the name of this man was Robert, sir-named Fulton ; but the cold hand of death fell upon him, and he slept with his fathers, on the twenty and third day of the second month of the eighteen hundred and fifteenth year of the Christian era.

4 However, the things which he brought into practice in his life time will be recorded, and his name spoken of by generations yet unborn.

5 Although, like other men of genius, in these days, he was spoken of but slightly at first ; for the people said, Lo ! the man is beside himself ! and they laughed at him ; nevertheless, he exceeded their expectations.

6 For it came to pass, that (assisted by Livingston, a man of wealth, and a lover of arts and learning) lie was enabled to construct certain curious vessels, called ,p the vernacular tongue, steam-boats.


•WAR. igt

% Now these steam-boats were cunningly contrived and had abundance of curious workmanship therein, such as surpassed the comprehension of all the wise men of the east, from the beginning to this day.

8 Jflowbeit, they were fashioned somewhat like unto the first* vessel that floated upon the waters, which was the ark of Noah, the ninth descendant from Adam ;

9 And that they might heat the water which produ- ced the steam, there was a fiery furnace placed in the midst of the vessels, and the sniokeissued from the tops thereof,

10 Moreover, they had, as it were, wheels within wheels : and they moved fast upon the waters even against the wind and the tide.

3 i And they first began to move upon the great jrjver Hudson, passing to and fro, from New- York t© Albany, in the north, conveying the people hither an^ thither in safety.

12 But when the scoffers, : -the enemies of Fulton, and the gainsayers, saw that the boats .moved pleasantly upon the river, they began to be ashamed of their own ignorance and stupidity, and were fain te get into the boats themselves ; after which, .instead jof laughing, they gaped at the inventor with astonishment.

13 And it came to pass, that the great Sanhedrim were pleased with the thing, inasmuch as they directed a fighting vessel, cf Columbia to be. built after this man- ner.

14 So a vessel was "built to carry the destroying en- gines, even a steam frigate, and they called the name ^thereof Fulton the First :

.Lj And certain skilful men were appointed comismr R 2


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Siemens to construct this new and dreadful engine of de- struction,

16 And Samuel, a philosopher, sir-named Mitchel, a citizen of New- York, was one of the commissioners ; also, Rutgers, and Morris, and W> olcot, and Dearborn, were other commissioners ; and they all gave their ser- vices freely for the good of their country.

17 Now she was equipped with thirty of the engines of destruction ; and the weight of a ball that they vom- ited forth was about a thousand shekels.

18 And, when the movement of the frigate was seen on the river, she was as a strong floating battery upon the waters, terrible as death.

19 And the length thereof was aboufan hundred cu- bits, and the breadth thereof thirty cubits :

20 Moreover, as they had no gophar-wood, they built the vessel partly of the locust-tree, and partly of the majestic oak that flourishes in the extensive forests of Columbia.

21 But it came to pass, when the wise men and the people of Britain heard of this steam frigate, they were seized with astonishment and fright ; inasmuch as it be- came a monster in their imaginations.

22 And they spake concerning it, saying, Lo ! the length of this wonder of the world, which hath been in- vented by these cunning Yankees, is about two hundred cubits, and the breadth thereof an hundred thirty and five cubits :

23 The number of her destroying engines is very great ; and the weight of a ball which she vomiteth forth, is about a thousand five hundred two score and ten shekels :


WAR. 195

24 Moreover, said they, she iS prepared to cast forth scalding water in showers upon the servants of the king, which will deform their countenances and spoil their beauty : ,

25 Likewise, they have prepared her with two-edged swords, which, by means of the steam of the vessel, issue like lightning out of her sides.

26 And now, also, the cunning and witchcraft of these Yankees, these sons of Belial, these children of Beelzebub, have invented another instrument of de- struction, more subtile than all the rest :

27 Yea, these are mighty evil things, and they are called torpedoes, which may be said to signify sleeping devils ; which come, as a thief in the night, to destroy the servants of the king ; and were contrived by that arch fiend, whose name was Fulton.

28 Now these wonderful torpedoes were made partly of brass and partly of iron, and were cunningly con.- trived with curious works, like unto a clock ; a»d as it were a large balL

29 And, after they were prepared, and a great quantity of the black dust put therein, they were let down into the water, nigh unto the strong ships, with intent to destroy them ;

30 And it was so, that when they struck against the bottom of the ship, the black dust in the torpedo would catch fire, and burst forth with tremendous roar, casting the vessel out of the waters and bursting her in twain.

31 New these torpedoes were brought into practice during the war, although the war ceased before they did


106 .LATE

that destruction to the enemies of Columbia, for which they were intended.

32 However, a certain man of courage and enter .^riize, whose name was Mix, prepared one of the torpedoes, and put it into the waters of the deep, at a place called Lyn-Haven Bay, at the mouth of the ■great baj v of Chesapeake, nigh unto the town of Nor- folk, in the state of Virginia ;

S3 And it moyed towards a strong ship of Britain, -called the Pkantagenet, after one of the former princes of England ; bm an accident happened a little before it reached the vessel, and burst it asunder in the waters with a tremendous noise ;

3.4 And spouted the water up into the air, as doth the mighty whale, and the sound thereof was, as it ^were the voice of thunder ;

35 And the servants of -the king were frightened horribly by the means thereof j after which they trem~ bled at this name torpedo ! — and were obliged to guard their vessels in the night, and put a double watch upon

-them ;

36 Moreover, they, condemned thi3.modeof warfare, •saying : Verily, this is a foul fashion of fighting ; inas- much as by yop.r cunning ye Yankees take the advan- tage of us ; and the thing is new unto us.

37 But they had wilfully forgotten, that in the life time of Fulton, they had offered him forty thousand pieces of gold, if he would bring these :, torpedoes iuio practice in their own country, that they might use them against the Gauls,* with whom they warred coutinu-

  • This was about the time of the .Boulogne flotiUfi*


WAR. 197

ally for more than twenty years : Howbeit they proved faithless to Fulton, and so he did it not for them.

38 Moreover, it came to pass, that a certain man, a pilot, even Joshua, sir-named Penny, became a victim of their spite, because he attempted to go against them with the torpedoes to drive them out of the waters of Columbia.

39 Now Joshua lived at a place called East Hamp- ton, being at the east end of Long Island, near Gard- ner's Island, opposite New London.

40 And the men of Britain came to his house in the night, and stole him away, even out of his bed, and caf- ried him on board a vessel of the king ; called the Fa- milies", from whence he was conveyed to Halifax, in the province of Nova Scotia.

4 Now while Joshua remained in the dungeons ef the king he was treated with the inhospitality of barba- rians ; moreover, they strove to lead him astray : but he proved faithful to his God and to his country ; for he had known the wickedness of Britain in times past.*

43 However, they kept him in bondage many months, after which they suffered him to go to his own country.

43 For the chief governor of the land of Columbia, and the great Sanhedrim, in their wisdem, had ordered


  • Joshua Penny had been, previous to the tear, im-

pressed in the British service, and hip* in it a number of years.


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two of the servants of the king to be 4aken and held as hostages for his safe return ; and, but for this thing, they would have hanged him^ even as a man hangeth a do*.


WAR. 199'


CHAP. LI.


Affairs in and about New-York, the first commercial city in America — icorking on the fortifications of Brooklyn and Haerlem — capture of the British- tender Eagle, by the Yankee smack.


N.


OW, as good sometimes eometk* out of evil, so the people of New-York, a great city, which lieth at the mouth of the river Hudson, nigh the sea coast, and containeth more than an hundred thousand souls,

2 When they beheld the wickedness that was com- mitted by the servants of the king, to the south an d round about, began to bestir themselves, and prepare for the dangers with which they were likely to be en- compassed :

3 Scr it came to pass, that the husbandmen from the surrounding country gathered together, and pitched- their tents hard by the city.

4 And the number that came to the defence of the place was about thirty thousand valiant men ; moreover there were about five thousand husbandmen from the state of New Jersey,*

  • The exertions of Daniel D. Thompkins, governor

of the state of N. York, at this time, mil long be re-- mewbered by fte people.


200 LATE

5 Now these men were called Jersey Blues, and they were encamped partly at Paules Hook, and part- ly at a place called the Narrows, which Beth to the south of the city about an hundred furlongs, where the destroying engines were placed in multitudes.

6 And when the term of the engagement of these men of Jersey expired, they grieved only that their time was spent for nought ; for they were ready and well prepared to meet the servants of the king.

7 Nevertheless, it was so that the freemen who came to the defence of the city, built strong holds and forts, and raised up fortifications in abundance, inasmuch as the whole place was as it were one camp.

8 Moreover, on the tenth day of the eighth month, in the eighteen hundred and fourteenth year, the inhabi- tants assembled together in the midst of the city, even in a place called the Park, where the Federal Hall, a superb edifice, rears its majestic front ; within the walls of which the wise men, the expounders of the law, preside, and deliberate for the benefit of the people.

9 Now it was about the twelfth hour of the day when the people began to gather themselves together j and, from the porch of the hall, the aged Willet,* with the star-spangled banner of Columbia waving over his silvery head, addressed the surrounding multitude.

10 And the people shouted with a loud voice, for the words of his mouth were pleasant to the sons of Liberty, and were in this wise :


Col Willet, of New-York.


WAR* 20£

11 Lo ! three score and fourteen years have brought- with them their bodily infirmities ; but were my strength as unimpaired as my Ibye for my country, and that soul which still animates me, ye would not have found nje in the forum, but in the midst of the battle, fight- ing against the enemies of freedom.

12 Thus did he encourage the people to prepare themselves for the protection of the city.

13 And certain wise men were appointed by the- people to bring these things into operation.*

14 So the people began to fortify themselves andT entrench the high.places round about the city.

15 And when they went out in its defence, to build their strong holds and to raise up their battlements \ lo ! the steam-boats of Fulton conveyed them thither, about a thousand at a time, even towards the heights of Brooklyn in the east, and the heights of Haerlem in tho north.

1 6 The young and the old, the rich and the poory went out together ; and took with them their bread and their wine ; and, cast up the earth for the defence of the place, freely, and without cost to the state.t

17 And whea they went into- the boats to cross over the river, there was loud shouting hi the b6ats and oa the shore.


  • Committee of safety, composed of the Aldermen

of the city, and their assistants.

f The services rendered on this occasion* by that re* spectable class of citizens, the firemen op new- yo£k ? were particularly conspicuous.

S


202 LATE

18 Moreover, as they passed along up the Hudson^ towards the heights of Haerlem, the fair daughters of Columbia, with hearts glowing with patriotism, waved their lily hands in token of applause.

19 Likewise, bands of men came from the neigh- bourhood round about ; even from Newark, and Pat- terson, and Paules Hook, which lie in the state of New- Jersey.

20 They had also captains appointed over their bands ; and Abraham and David were two among the captains.*

21 Now Abraham, with his band, came a great way, even from the town of Patterson, where the wonderful waterfalls pour headlong over the rocky mountains, re- flecting in the sun a thousand brilliant rainbows.

22 Thus for an hundred days did the people of New- York prepare themselves for danger, and cast up en- trenchments for many furlengs round about the city j so that the people of Britain were afraid to go against it.f


  • Major Godwin and Major Hunt.

t So great was the enthusiasm of the people in con~ tributing their personal services to the erection of for- tifications on the heights of Haerlem and Brooklyn, that scarcely could an individual be found in the po- pulous city of Nac-York, from hoary age to tender youth, capable: of using a mattock or a spade, who did not volunteer his services in this work of patriotism. Ev:n the Ladies were conspicuous in aiding and chet >?r<g the labours of their Fathers, their Husbands, {heir brothers, and their Children. Amongst others, the numerous societies of Freemasons joined in a body, find headed by their Grand-Master y* who was also

•#- Hwi'Pe y/M Cimiop, noiv £o*eraorot UiesTaieoi Kew.Yorfc


WAR. 203

23 Nevertheless the strong ships of war of Britain Jnoved upon the waters of the ocean around the place in numbers, but they were afraid to approach the city ; for when they came nigh, the men of Columbia let the destroying engines loose upon them, even those that


Mayor of the city, proceeded to Brooklyn, and assist- ed very spiritedly in its defence. On this occasion an elderly gentleman, one of the order, who had two sons (his only children) in the service of his country r , one of them highly distinguished during the war for his wounds and his bravery, sung the following stanzas, in his own character of Mason and Father, ichilst the Lodges were at refreshment :

1.

Hail, Children of light ! whom the Charities send. Where the bloodhounds of Britain are shortly ex- pected ; Who, your country, your wives, your firesides to defend, On the summit of Brooklyn have ramparts erected : Firm and true to the trade, Continue y our aid, Till the top-stone with shouting triumphant is laid : The free and accepted will never despair, Led on by their worthy Grand Master and Mayor,

II.

For me, whose dismissal must shortly arrive,

To Heav'n I prefer this my fervent, petition :

  • S May I never America's freedom survive,

u Nor behold her disgrac'd by a shameful submission : " And, though righteously steel'd, " If at last she must yield, " May my sons do their duty, and die in the field 'P But the free and accepted will never despair, Led on by their worthy Grand Master and Mayor.


104 LATE

vomited forth whizzing balls, like shooting stars 3 red from the fiery furnace.

24 Notwithstanding, the haughty captains of the ships of Britain would send in their boats to rob the market-men and the fishermen : howbeit, they were sometimes entrapped.

25 For it came to pass, upon a certain day, that the Poictiers, a mighty ship of the king, lying at a place called Sandy-Hook, sent out one of her tenders, even the Eagle, in search of this kind of plunder :

26 Whereupon, a fishing boat of Columbia, called the Yankee, under the direction of a chief captaia called Lewis,* prepared herself with a number of men to entrap the Eagle.

27 So they took a fatted calf, a bleating lamb, and a noisy goose, B,nd placed them upon the deck of the boat ; and when the servants of the king came nigh the Yankee, thinking they were about to be treated handsomely with the good things of the land of Co- lumbia, their hearts were rejoiced ;

•28 And they commanded the vessel called the Yan- kee to follow after them, towards the ship of the king, their master ; but at this moment the men of Columbia arose up from their hiding-places in the hold of the boat, and shot into the vessel of Britain.

29 At the sound of which they were so astonished, that they forgot to pat the match to the black dust of


  • Commodore Lewis, commander of the flotilla in

the .harbor of New. York — Sailing-master Percival gallantly spnducted this expedition.


WAR. 205

tlie huge howitzer, a destructive engine made of brass, which they had prepared to destroy the men of Colum- bia.

30 So they were confused, and surrendered the Ea^ gle up to the Yankee.

31 And as they came up to the city, before the Bat- tery, which is a beautiful place to the south thereof, the thousands who were assembled there, to celebrate the Columbian Jubilee,* rent the air with loud shouts of joy, whilst the roaring engines echoed to the skies.

32 Thus was the lamb preserved, and the proud and cunning men of Britain outwitted with a fatted calf an" a Yankee goose.


  • American Independence.


Eos =•? SAife


CHAP. LI1.

Affairs on the ocean — privateer Prince of Neufc'hd- tel — Marquis' of Tweedale defeated in Upper Cana- da — Capture of the President— loss of the Sylph — Capture of the Cyane and the Levant by the Con' stitution — capture of the St. Lawrence — capture of the Penguin by the Hornet, captain Biddle*


&


•TILL there was no peace, and the evils of war continued on the face of the deep, and the waters thereof were encrimsoned with the blood of man.

2 And it came to pass, on the eleventh day of the tenth month, in the eighteen hundred and fourteenth year, that there was a sore battle fought between five barges from the Endymion, a strong ship of the king, and a privateer, called the Prince-of Neufchatel, com- manded by the valiant Ordonneaux, a man of Gaul.

3 Moreover, the number of the men of Britain were threefold greater than the people of Columbia ; and the fight happened near unto a place called Nan- tucket, in the east, journeying towards Boston.

4 Now they sat their engines to work with dreadful violence ; but in about the third part of an hour the barf es of the king's ship were overcome ; and more tbaa tfiree score aad ten of the men *>f Britain ware


war. m

s?:in and maimed : the loss in the privateer wis 'zlr slain, and about a score wounded.

5 Now this battle happened in the sirae month i-r. which more than a thousand men of the warriors of Britain, commanded by the Marquis of Tweedale, were defeated at Black Creek, in Upper Canada, and driven • to their strong holds by the men of "Columbia, tinder the gallant Bissel.*

6 Ten days after which the steam frigate, Fultok the First, was launched forth into the waters at New- 'York,

7 And it came to pass, on the fifteenth day of th* first month of the next year, that one of the tall ships of Columbia fell into the hands cf the servants of the king ;

8 And she was called the President, after the title of the chief magistrate of the land of Columbia ; more- over, she was commanded by the gallant Decatur,

9 Who, but for an accident that befel his ship the day 'before,! whilst he was moving out of the harbor ef

New-York, would have outsailed the fleet of Britain, and escaped, as did the brave trad persevering Hull, of the Constitution, in the first year of the war s |

10 Nevertheless, it was so, that Decatur was, as it were, surrounded by the ships of the king, even five


  • Gen. Bissel.

t She was injured by grounding off Sandy Hook, % Commodore Hull, in this affair, gained much ap- plause, for his manoeuvres in escaping from the Brittik fleeU


T m LATE

of them ; so one of the vessels, called the Endymion fell upon him, and Decatur fought hard against her, and would have taken her ;

1 1 But the rest of the strong ships came down upoh him, and opened their thundering engines, and com- pelled him to surrender his ship to the fleet of Britain.

12 However, it was a bloody fight ; and there fell of the men of Columbia that day twenty and four that were slain outright, and about two score and ten were maimed, after having kept the destroying engines to work about the space of three hours : howbeit, Decatur lost no honor thereby.

13 Two days after this, a strong vessel of the king, called the Sylph, was cast away, in a dreadful storm, at a place called Southampton, being on Long-Island ? where more than ah hundred men of Britain perished, in the dead of the night ; and the vessel parted asunder and was lost.

14 Moreover, there were six of the men of Britain who survived their brethren, and were preserved on pieces of the wreck, until the next day, when the neighbouring people took them into their houses' and nourished them ;

15 And, when they were sufficiently recovered, that misfortune might not bear to;; heavy upon them, they were clad, and silver given to them, and they were sent to their own country, at the expense of the people of Columbia.

16 (Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy, saith the scripture.)

1-7 Now it came to pass, in these days, whilst the flee? of Britain captured the vessels of Columbia, wherv


WAR. -20$

they caught them singly upon the ocean, that the single ships of Columbia began to capture the ships of Britain by pairs :

18 Inasmuch as it happened on the twentieth day ©f the second month of the same year, that a certain strong vessel called the Constitution, commanded by the brave Stewart, fell in with two of the strong ships of the king, and compelled them both, in the space of forty minutes, to strike the red cross of Britain to the stars of Columbia.

19 And the slain and wounded of the king's ships were seventy and seven; of the men of Columbia three were slain and twelve maimed : and the names of the vessels of Britain were the Cyane and the Le- vant ; but the Levant was retaken in a neutral port,* by two strong ships- oi the king.f

20 Now the valiant Stewart and his brave men gat great praise for their deeds, even the great Sanhedrim of the people honored them, and gave them twenty thousand pieces of silver.

21 In the same-month the-gaHant Boyle, command- ing the privateer Chasseur, captured the St. Lawrence, a fighting vessel of the king, in the fourth part of an hour.

22 And the killed and wounded of the St. Law- rence were thirty and eight j and the Chasseur had five slain and eight maimed.

23 Moreover, it came to pass, on the twenty-third

■ day of the next month, that another fighting vessel of

  • Pcrio Prava. | Acasfa and Ncwc&sge,


210 LATE

the king, called the Penguin, was taken by the Hornet, a strong vessel of Columbia, commanded by a man of valor, whose sir-name was Biddle.

24 However, the battle was a bloody one, and the vessels kept their engines of destruction fiercely in motion, for about the space of half an hour before the flag of Britain was lowered to the stripes of Colum- bia.

25 And the slaughter was great ; for there fell of the men of Britain two score and one : but the slain of Columbia was only one, and the maimed were eleven.

2@ And Biddle was honored greatly for his cou- rage :

27 But this was the last sea-fight of importance, be° ing near the close of the war.

28 Now about this time the navy of Columbia had increased more than fourfold, and the fame thereof had extended to all nations.

29 For, though Columbia was young, even as it were in the gristle of her youth j yet she now began to resume the appearance* and display the vigor of. manhood.


WAR. 2U


CHAP. LIII.

British fleet arrives near New-Orleans — the Ameru can flotilla captured- — attacks by the British upon the army of Gen. Jackson.


N<


OW, when the lords and the counsellors, and the wise men of Britain, heard of all the tribulations that befelthemin the land of Columbia, they were troubled in their minds.

2 And as they had made what they called a demon- stration at Baltimore, they bethought themselves of ma- king another demonstration in the south.

3 (Now the true signification, in the vernacular tongue, of the word demonstration, had always been familiar to the children of Columbia; but the new in- terpretation, although it wounded the pride of Britain, tickled the sons of Columbia ; for, as the world must think to this day, so tiiey could only construe it, an oc= ular demonstration of British folly.)

4 So it came to pass, that they gathered together their army and their navy, even two score and ten fighting vessels, carrying therein about twenty thousand men of war; and the name of the chief captain of the navy was Cochrane ; and the chief captains of the army were P&kenham, Gibbs, and Keane.


m LATE.

5 And they essayed to go against the city of -Nem^ Orleans, which lieth to the south, on the. borders of the great river Mississippi, in the state of Louisiana, which. was covenanted in good faith, to the United States in die days when Jefferson presided- as chief governor of the land of Columbia.

6 But It came to pass, that Jackson, when he had returned from the capture of Pensacola, where he cork- ed up the bottles of iniquity that were ready to be einp- ried out upon the men of Columbia,

7 Had arrived with his army at New-Orleans, he began to fortify the place, for he heard it noised abroad that the king was bent upon taking the city.

8 About this time, Jackson communed with Clai- borne the governor, touching the matter ; and as his men of war were but few, the valiant husbandmen ofr Louisiana, Tennessee, Kentucky, and the Mississippi Territory, were informed of the evil, and accordingly they flocked in multitudes to the banners of Jackson.

9 Now, as Jackson and Claiborne had counted upon the arrival of the stroHg ships of Britain, so it happened, hi the latter part of the eighteen hundred and fourteenth year, that they made their appearance, even in the twelfth month of the year.

10 And it was so, that when they had come as nigh as they could unto the city with their heavy ships, some of which carried an hundred of the destroying engiwes, they cast anchor : %

11 And lo, after having passed a certain dangerous place called Pass Christian, they prepared their boats, fpnlamiag more than a thousand men, and sent them


WAR, 21S

in great numbers against the boats of Columbia that were upon the waters of the lakes about the city.*

12 Now these small vessels of Columbia were com- manded by Thomas, a brave man, whose sir-name was Jones, and he gave them hindrance.

13 Nevertheless, in the space of about two hours ? tho boats of Columbia were captured by the vessels of Britain, one after another, until they were all taken : however, the mariners, of Columbia fought well, and, gained great praise ; and the loss of the king was; about three hundred.

14 Now the capture of the gun-boats of the United States upon these waters encouraged the servants of the king, so they began to land their mighty army upon the shores of Columbia in great multitudes from their boats :

1 5 And they pitched their tents, and cast up fortifi- cations, and prepared to assail the strong hold of Jack- son, the chief captain.

lf> And, that the host of Britain might be discom- fited at the onset, Jackson went out with his army against them; but the men of war of the king were twofold greater than the men of Columbia, so Jackson v, unable to drive them away.

J However, lie fought bravely against them, and si- '- numbers of them ; albeit, the slain and maimed ef Columbia were about two hundied; so Jackson, drew back to his entrenchments, and strengthened him- self there.


  • Lakes Borgne and PoncJiartrcin,

T


$M LATE

18 Now this happened on the twenty and third day of the twefth month, in the eighteen hundred and four- teenth year-

19 And it Game to pass, on the twenty-seventh day of the same month, that a fighting vessel of the United States, called the Caroline, commanded by Daniel, was set fire to, and blown up, by the heated balls of the king's fiery furnaGe.

20* On the next day, the whole host of Britain gather- ed themselves- together, and with their might went against the strong hold of Jackson.

2! But Jackson let the destroying engines loose upon the servants of Britain, and compelled them to return to their encampments with great loss, even an hundred and two score.-

22 Nevertheless,, on the first day of the first month of the eighteen hundred and fifteenth year, the men of war of Britain came again, and strove to dislodge the army of Jackson ; but again they were deceived, and lost about an hundred men.

23 At this time there arrived to the aid of Jackson about two thousand five hundred valiant men, from the Backs-woods of Kentucky^

24 Disappointed in their expectations, and failing in their attempts to discomfit the army of Columbia, the captains and the host of Britain arrayed themselves ire their might to go against the hold of Jackson with their whole force.

25 And the morning of the eighth day of the month W«s pitched upon, by the men of Britain, for conquering the host of Columbia, and settling themselvgs in the fcindol liberty.


WAR. 215

26 Ho they prepared themselves with their iascines, 5.nd their scaling ladders, and their bombs, and thefc rockets, and all the weapons of destruction that the in- genuity of Britain could invent.

27 After \viiie~h 'Pakenham, the chief captain of the host of the king, spake to the officers and the men of war that were under him, saying,

28 Be ye prepared ; for, lo ! to-morrow, at the dawn- ing of the day, our mighty squadrons shall rush upon these "Yankees, and destroy them.

29 Here will we establish ourselves upon the borders df Columbia ; and ye shall be officers, tythemen, and tax-gatherers, under the king, your master :

<0 Moreover, a day and a night shall ye plunder and •riot : and your watch-word shall be, BEAUTY ANP fcOQTY:!


?lt LATE


CHAP. LIV

Grand Battle of New-Orleans.


.L% 0\V Pakenham, the chief captain of the host of Britain, made an end of addressing the officers and the soldiers of the king :

2 And it came to pass, in the one thousand eight hundred aud fifteenth year of the Christain era, in the first month of the year, and on the eighth day of the month,

3 Being on the Sabbath day, (which, as it is written in the scriptures, Thou shalt remember and keep

HOLY,)

4 That the mighty army of the king, which had moved out of the strong ships of Britain, came, in their strength, to make conquest of the territory of Colum- bia, which iieth to the south ;

5 And to place therein a princely ruler, and all man- ner of officers, the servants of the king, even unto a tax- gatherer.

6 So, early in the morning, they appeared before the camp of the men of Columbia, even the strong hold which Jackson, the chief captain, had fortified.

7 Their polished steels, of fine workmanship, glit- tered in the sun, and the movement of their squadrons was as the waving of a wheat-field, when the south wicd passeth gently over it.


WAR. 217

8 The fierceness of their coming was as the coming • of a thousand untamed lions, which move majestically ®ver the sandy deserts of Arabia.

9 And the army rested upon the the plains of Mac Frardies, nigh unto the cypress swamp, being distant from the city about forty and eight furl >ngs.

10 And it was about the rising of the sun, when the battering-rams of the king began to utter their noises; and the sound thereof was terrible as -the roaring of lions, or the voice of many thunders.

11 Moreover, they cast forth bombs, and Congreve rockets, weapons of destruction, which were not known, in the days of Jehoshaphat.

12 Nevertheless, the soul of Jackson failed him not, neither was he disHia\'ed, for he was entrenched round about ; and when he raised his hand, beheld every man's heart therein.

13 And Jackson spake, and , said unto his captains df fifties, and his captains of hundreds, Fear not ; we defend our lives and our liberty, and in that tiling tiie Lord will not forsake us :

1 4 Therefore, let every man be upon his watch ; and let the destroying engines now ■- titter forth their thunders In abundance :

15 And ye tunning back-woodsmen, who have known duly to hunt the squirrel, the wolf, and the deer, now pour forth yourstrength upon the mighty non, that we may not be overcome.

16 And as the black dust cast upon a burning cdal instantly mounteth into a flame, so was the spirit of the husbandmen of the backwoods of Columbia.

17 Now the brave men from Tennessee &ijq K.ec-

.T %




518 LATE

tucky set their shining rifles to work, and the destroy- ing engines began to vomit their thunders upon the ser- vants oT the king.

18 Twice did the host of Britain, in solid columns,

  • xome against the entrenchments of Jackson, and twice

%e drove them back.

19 Moreover, Daniel the brave, who had raised up defences upon the banks of the river, likewise let his -engines loose Upon them, and shot into the camp of the king.

20 And the men of Britain strove to scale the ram- parts, and get into the strong hold of Jackson ; but the husbandmen drove them back with great slaughter.

21 The fire and the smoke, and the deafaing noise ^that sounded along the battlements, were tremendous

for more than the space of two hours, when the dread- "M roarings ceased, for the warriors of the king fled in >confusion.

22 But when the sulphureous vapors arose, behold 'the battle-ground was covered with the slain and the

wounded officers and soldiers of the kingdom of Great .Britain !

23 Humanity shuddered at the awful scene, whilst the green fields blushed.

24 Seven hundred of the servants of the king were ^Tslain; and their whole loss that day was two thousand

six hundred valiant men, who had fought under Wel- lington, the champion of England.

25 And Pakenham, the chief captain of the host •«f Britain, the brother-in-law of Wellington, was -amongst the slain ; and they served his body as they •*'fead served the bodj of Boss, their chief captain at


wm. 2i'9

the Baltimore demonstration, prc-serving it, in like man- lier, with the strong waters of Jajnaica.

26 Moreover, one of their chief captains, whose sir- name was Gibbs, was also slain, and K'eane was sorely ^wounded : so that the charge of the host of Britain that remained from the slaughter, fell to a certain man whose name was Lambert.

27 The loss of the army of Jackson was only se- ven slain and seven maimed, a circumstance unparallel- ed in the annals of history : howbeit, there were about two score slain and wounded upon the other side of the river.

28 Now the whole loss of the king's army, from the time they came against the country of Louisiana until their departure, was about five thousand.

29 After this they were discouraged, for there was but a faint hope left for them; so they departed, and went into the strong ships of the king, with their chief captain in high spirits.

30 It is written in the book of Solomon, that a fool laugheth at his own folly : now the men of Britain <were not inclined to laugh, for they were sorely griev= ed ; and, but for the fear of the laughter of others^ would have wept outright.

31 And Jackson, the chief captain of the host of Columbia, gave great praise to the gallant Coffee, and Carrol, and Daniel, whose sirname was Patterson^ and all the valiant men who fought on that glorious day.,

32 Moreover, Jackson was honored with great ho- Hour by the people throughout the land of Columbia J even the great Sanhedrim were pleased with him, and

-exalted his name.


220 -LATE

33 And the inhabitants of New-Orleans were great- ly rejoiced, and carried him through the streets of the city above the rest ; and the virgins of Co lumbia strew- ed his path with roses.

34.Fory.Io! he had defended them from the vio- lence of savages, who came in search of beauty and booiy .'

35 And when the wounded, of the host of Britain, were brought into the city, the fair daughters of Coluin- .bia took their fine linen and bound up the wounds of the poor fainting officers and soldiers of the king, and .sat bread and wine before them, to clteer their drooping spirits.

36 Now again were the servants of the king disap- pointed ; for, as they were sent upon an evil, as well as & foolish errand, they expected nut mercy.

37 And when they saw the goodness that was shower- ed upon them, they said, Surely ye are angels sent down /ram heaven to heal the wounds inflicted by the folly of

nations !

38 And should we ag.dn be' led on to battle against your country, with propositions to violate your happi- ness, our swords, as by magic, shall be stayed, and drop

harmless at the feet of virtuje and beauty !


'WAR. 221


CHAP. LV. Peace.


JL^I OW after the fleet of Britain had departed from New-Orleans in dismay, they committed many other depredations of a petty nature.

2 In the mean time, Cockburn, the wicked, was busi- ly employed in what his heart delighted ; inasmuch as he carried the men of Britain against the borders of South Carolina and Georgia, and continued his system of robbery.

3 And here, with the strong ships of Britain, he cap- tured a town called St. Marys-, in the state of Georgia and, among other evils, he stole away the sable sons of Ethiopia.

4 And conveyed them to the island of Bermuda, of which the king had made him chief governor, and cold them, after promising them liberty and free- dom.

■5 However, it came to pass about this time, thai the news of peace being made between the nations arrl-» ved in the land of Columbia.

6 For it had happened that the great Sanhedrim in their wisdom, had sent out Henry, sirnamed On v. and


222 LATE

ISussel, two wise men, called, in the vernacular tongue, commissioners, to join themselves with Bayard and Gallatin, who were sent before them, to try and make ^eace :

7 For the voice of the people of Columbia had spo- ken peace from the beginning ; they wished war might cease, and that the breach between the nations might be

4iealed.

8 In the mean time the king sent some of his wise wen to meet the wise men of Columbia, at a place called Ghent, a town a great way off, in the country of Flanders ;

9 For it came to pass, that the generous mediation offered by the emperor of Russia was refused by the council of Britain, who had not yielded to the voice of accommodation.

10 So, when the ministers of the two nations were met, they communed a long time with one another, touching the matter ;

11 But the ministers oT Britain raised up difficul- ties, and demanded certain foolish terms, which, in the Latin tongue, were written sine qua non, and which being translated into the Yankee tongue, might be said to mean neck or nothing.

12 Nevertheless, in process of time, the wise men Of Britain waved their demands, and agreed to the sine qua non given them by the commissioners of Co- hambia.

13 So a treaty of peace was made and signed by the

-CjQjmnhsioner.3 of both parties, on the twenty and

fourth day of the twelfth month, of the one thousand

  • ei£ut hundred and fourteenth year of the -christian era;


WAR. 233

14 And the treaty was sent to England, and con- firmed by the Prince Regent, on the twenty-eigth day of the same month ; for he was tired of the war, and saw no hopes of conquering the sons of liberty.

15 After which it was sent from Britain, across the the mighty deep, about three thousand miles, to receive the sanction of the free people of Columbia.

16 And the great Sanhedrim of the people examined the treaty, and it was accepted and confirmed by them on the seventeenth day of the second month, in the eighteen hundred and fifteenth year.

17 After which it was ratified and signed with the hand-writing of James, the chief governor of the land of Columbia, and published to the world.

18 Thus was a stop put to the shedding of human blood ; and the noise of the destroying engines sunk down into silence, and every man returned to his owa home in peace.

19 Now when it was known for a certainty that peace was ma'de between the nations, the people throughout the land were rejoiced beyond measure.

20 And when the news thereof was spread abroad, the temples of the Lord were opened, and the peopfe of Columbia praised God for his goodness ; yea, they thanked him that he had strengthened their arms, and delivered them from the paw of the lion.

21 Thus did the children of Columbia praise the Lord in the strength of their youth, and in the days of their prosperity ; not waiting till the cold and palsied hand of age had made them feeble, and robbed their prayers of half their virtue.

22 Henceforth may the nations of the earth learn


22'4 . LATH

wisdom : then shall peace become triumphant, and the people of Columbia be at rest ;

23 And, as it is written, their swords may be beaten into ploughshares, and their spears turned into pruning- hooks.

24 But> nevertheless, if this war like all other wars ? brought evil upon the sons of men, it demonstrated to the world, that the people of Columbia were able to defend themselves, single-handed, against one of the. strongest powers of Europe.

25 And the mighty kings and potentates of the earth shall learn, from this example of Republican patriotism, that the people are the only tt legitimate sovereigns" of the landof Columbia.

26 Now the gladness of the hearts of the people of Columbia at the sound of peace, was extravagant , inasmuch a£ ( it caused them to let loose their destroying engines, that were now become harmless, and set in rac> tion their loud pealing bells, that sounded along the splendid arch of heaven.

27 Moreover, they made great fires and illumina- tions in the night time, and light was spread over the face of the land ;

28 And the beauty thereof was as if, from the blue and spangled vault of heaven, it had showered diamonds :

29 And all the nations of the earth beheld the glory of. Columbia.

SND OF THE HISTORY OF THE LATE WAR,


WAR. 2§5


ALGERINE WAR,

American squadron sails from New-York— -arrives an the Mediterranean, and captures the Algerir.e vessels — treaty of peace with the Dey — affairs at Tunis and Tripoli — Decatur^s return to America,


T

  • ? OW it came to pass, that while the war raged be-"

tween the people of Columbia and the kingdom of Great

Britain, other evils rose up in the east,

2 For the people who inhabited the coast ofBarbary, even the Ugennes. c omi tted great depredations upon the commerce/of Columbia j

3 Inasmuch as they captured their merchant vessels, and held the men of Columbia who wrought therein in cruel bondage.

4 Now these Algerines, who were barbarians, dwelt upon the borders of the great se \ called tiie Mediterra- nean, in the way journeying tc . aids the Garden of F~ den, the cradle of" the world; i pen paradise, where stood the tree of good and evil, and wnere the great iver 1 • : p i ates emptieth its waters into ihe Gulph <;; Ptrsia, v ',;:ii 1 th b '-;i six thousand six hi dr< ci and sixty-six niilei to liie east of Washington, the chief city oi the land of Columbia.

U


224. LATE

5 Moreover, the waters of this great sea washed the shores of ancient Palestine, the holy land, the place of our forefathers, and the country of Egypt, where the children of Israel were held in bondage forty years.

G Nevertheless, the manifold evils which these barbarians committed, by the instigation of Satan with- in them, or by being led astray by the enemies of Co- lumbia, raised the voice of the great Sanhedrim against them.

7 For they had violated the treaty which the people of Columbia had made with them in good faith, and set

^ji at nought.

8 Now it had curiously happened, that through fear or folly all the nations of the earth had always accustomed themselves to pay tribute to these barba- rians ;

9 8ut the people of Columbia were the first to break the charm, with their brave captains and their destroy- ing engines, many years ago.*

10 Howbeit, they were now again compelled to go against them, and strive to bring them to a sense of just- ice, if not by persuasion, by communications from the mouths of their destroying engines.

11 So it came to pass, on the third day of the third month, in the one thousand eight hundred and fifteenth year of the Christian era,


  • Alluding to the war against the Barbary powers^

about 1804.


War. 07

12 That the great Sanhedrim of the people sent forth a decree, making war upon the people of Algiers, who were ruled by a man whom they tailed the Dey.

13 After which, the fleet of Columbia, which had been increased by the folly of Britain, was prepared to go against them ; and the gallant Decatur was made chief captain thereof.

14 The number of the strong vessels was about half a score, and the names of the mightiest amongst them were called the Guerriere, the Macedonian, and the Constellation.

15 Now the name of the first of these tall ships was after a strong ship of the king of Britain, which was taken by the brave Hull, and burnt upon the wa- ters ; and the Macedonian was also taken from Britain by Stephen, sir- named Decatur:

16 And when they came into the waters of Europe, the men of Britain* gnashed their teeth with vexation, neither would they hehoid them, but they turned their backs, for their pride was wounded, whilst the surround- ing nations beheld the fleet with astonishment.

17 Now it was on the eighteenth day of the fifth month, in the same year, in the after part of the day, that the fleet of Columbia spread their wings to the western breeze, and sailed from the haven of New- York j « 

IS And, with Decatur, the chief captajn, in the Guerriere, they bade farewell to the land of Columbia ;


  • 4t Gibraltar, #c.


223 LATE

find the shouts of tlie people made toe welkin ring, and their blessings followed aftej then?

19 And it came to pass, when Decatur, -vith the fleet of Columbia, arrived in the waters of the Mediterranean sea, being thirty days after he left the land of Columbia,

20 That he fell in with one of the strongest fighting ships of these barbarians, called the Misoda, and he fol- lowed after her, and in less than the space of half an hour, after letting his destroying engines loose upon her, he took her captive, with five hundred men that were in her.

21 And thirty of the barbarians were slain, among whom was their chief captain, whom they called Rais Hammida ; besides many were wounded, and about four hundred prisoners were taken j but Decatur had not a man killed.

22 Moreover, on the second day afterwards, the fleet of Columbia captured another fighting vessel of the ■Marines:

~3 An,c] the bhh that'Vere found on board, being numbered, were tWei i\ and three, and the prisoners were four score : howbeit, thtre were none of the people of Columbia even maimed. Thus was the navy of Columbia triumphant in the east, as it had been in the west.

24 Now these things happened nigh unto a place called Carthagena, on Ihe borders of Spnha ; and when the Spaniards beheld the skill and prowess of the pece- pie of Columbia, they were amazed :

25 Immediately after this, Decatur departed, and went with his fleet to the port of \lgiers, the chief city of the barbarians, lyin^on the borders of Africa.

26 But when their ruler beheld the star-spanrrled ban- ners of Columbia, he trembled as the aspen-leaf j for


WAR. 22^

lie had heard that his strong vessels were taken by the ships of Columbia, and his admiral slain, and he was ready to bow down.

27 And Decatur demanded the men of Columbia without ransom, who were held in bondage ; and ten thousand pieces of silver, for the evils they had commit- ted against the people of Columbia : and the Dey had three hours to answer him yea, or Days,

28 However, he quickly agreed to the propositions of Decatur : and he paid the money, and signed the trea- ty which Decatur had prepared for him, and delivered up all the men of Columbia whom he held as slaves.

29 And the treaty was confirmed at Washington the chief city, and signed by James the chief governor, on the twenty and sixth day of the twelfth month, in the same year : and Detatur generously made a present of the step Misoda to the Dey,

30 Now it came to pass, after Decatur had settled the peace with the Dey of Algiers, according to his wish- es, that he sailed against another town of the barbarians, called Tunis,

31 For the governor of this place, who is ca4ed the Bev, had permitted great evils to be committed agaiesi trie people of Columbia, by theships of Britain, during the late war ; inasmuch as they let them conrp into their waters, and ta'<e away the vessels of Columbia that were prizes.

-?2 So, forthese depredations, the gallant Decatur de- fiianded forty thousand pieces of silver, which, aA' r & short c ebe;ation, the Bey was fain to ;. r raiit. lest, perad- vennre the city might, from the force of the destroying tfxfgfc&s, begin to tumble about his ear§. V2


230 LATE

33 From the port of Tunis, Decalur departed and went to a place called Tripoli, which lieth to the south thereof, where the brave Eaton* fought, and erected the banners of Columbia upon the walls of Derne.

34 Now the chief governor of the Tripolitans, whom, they called the Bashaw, had suffered like evils to be done by the British in his dominions which had been permitted by the Bey of Tunis.

35 So likewise, for these evils Decatur demanded thirty thousand pieces of silver, but at first the Ba- shaw refused to pay it.

36 However, when he saw the strong ships of Co- lumbia were about to destroy the town, he paid the money, save a little, which he was unable to get, and for which Decatur compelled him to release ten captives of other nations, whom he held in "bondage.

37 Thus did Decatur, and his brave men in the same year, compel the powers of Barbary to respect the banners of Columbia.

38 Now, having accomplished the object of his ex- pedition, he returned, encircled with glory, to the land of Columbia :

39 And all the people were rejoiced with great joy, and they made feasts for him, and extolled his name.

40 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim of the people honored him for his gallant exploits, and gave unto him and his brave officers and mariners, an hundred thou- sand pieces of silver.


  • Gen. Eaton, a hero of the American war with

Tripoli^ some years ago.


WAR. 231


CONCLUSION.


Commodore Bainbridge — Lord 'ExmouiJi's Expcai Hon against Algiers.


-N the mean time, it had come to pass, that lest the flfet of Decatur should not be sufficient, the £feat San- hedrim sent out after him another strong fleet, com- manded bv the valiant Bainbridg-e.

2 But, lo ! when his fiVet arrived therp, the peacie had b^en made, and an end out to the war by the fleet of Decatur : so, after sailing; round about the coast, Bainbridge returned home again with the fleet of Co- lumbia.

3 Now it came to pass, after Decatur had returned in triuinoh to the land of Columbia, that the lords and the counsellors of Britain became jealous of the fame of Columbia, which she had gained in the east, in re- leasing her people from slavery, as well as those of other nations.

4 Moreover, the barbarians committed depredations against the people of Britain, neither did they regard their royal cross, as they did the stars of Columbia.

5 So the king fitted out a mighty fleet to go against them j and the name of the chief captain thereof was


232 LATE

Pellew, to whom the king of Britain had given a new name, and called him lord Exmouth.

6 Accordingly, as their movements were slow, in the fourth month of the one thousand eight hundred and sixteenth year of the Christian era, the mighty fleet of Britain weighed anchor, and shortly arrived before the city of Algiers, as the fleet of Columbia had done many months before them.

7 And it was so, that the chief captain of Britain, n the name (>( the king his master, demanded of the Bey, the men of Britain, whom he held as slaves, and also those of other nations.

8 But the Dey rerused, saying, Ye shall pay unto me five hundred pieces of silver for every slave ; then will I release them, and they shall be free.

9 And Exmouth, the lord of Britain, jielded to the propositions of the barbarians, and accordingly gavfe unto them the money, eveh more than twenty horses could draw ;

10 for the number of Christian slaves which Ex- mouth bought of the barbarians, was about five hun- dred.

i I Therefore the fleet of Britain succeeded not, as did the fleet of Decatur.*


  • Lord Exmouth has sinrr. in a second expedition,

succeeded in releasing all ' 'hristian captives confined in Algiers, a?id in obtaining the ransom money , to a very considerable amount) which the Dey had pre* piously received from England and Najjks.


WAR. 233

12 Thus, in this thing, did the lords of Britain strive to snatch the laurel from the brow of Colum- bia ;

13 Hut her valiant sons had entwined the wreath of glory ; and the scribes of this day shall record it, in ever-living characters, on the pyramid of fame.


frlNlSv


BIBLE SOCIETIES AND SUNDAY SCHOOLS.


It was our intention to have expatiated largely on the subjectof Bible Societies — of their importance, and unprecedented extension throughout Europe and America : but the limits of this publication prevent us from entering far on this subject, luminous as it is ; how- ever, in time, another opportunity may offer : at present, the names of the officiating persons in America, by be- ing inserted, may serve to show the respectability of this valuable establishment, which posterity will ad- mire.

OFFICERS OF THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY.

PRESIDENT,

Hon. EliAs Boudinot, l. l. d., of New-Jersey VICE-PRESIDENTS, Hon. John Jay, Esq. of New- York. Matthew Clarkson, Esq. of New- York. Daniel D. Tompkins, Vice-President of the United

States. Hon. De Witt Clinton, Governor of the State of

New- York. Hon. Smith Thompson, Chief Justice of the State of

New- York.

juun. JOffS Langdon, of New-Hampshire.

Hon. Caleb Strong, of Massachusetts.

Hon. John Cotton Smith, of Connecticut.

Hon. Andrew Kirkpatrick, Chief Justice of the State

of New- Jersey. Hon. William Tilghman, Chief Justice of the State of

Pennsylvania. Hon. Daniel Murray, of Maryland. Joseph Nourse, Esq, Register of the Treasury of the

United States. Hon. John Quincy Adams, Secretary of State of the

United States. Francis S. Key, Esq. District of Columbia- Hon. Bushrod Washington, of Virginia, Judge of

Supreme Court U, S.


Hon. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, of Charles- ton, S. C. His Excellency Thomas Worthington, of Ohio. John Boltom, Esq. of Georgia. Felix Grundy, Esq. of Tennessee. SECRETARIES. Rev. John Mason, D. D. Secretary for Foreign Cor- respondence. Rev. John B. Romeyn, D. D. Secretary for Domestic Correspondence.

Richard Varick, Esq. Treasurer. Mr. John Pintard, Recording Secretary and Account- ant.

Mr. John E. Caldwell, Agent.


An account of the number of Bible Societies in the United States.


New-Hampshire,


1 1


Virginia,


15


Massachusetts,


14]


North Carolina,


2


Vermont,


o


South Carolina,


4


Connecticut,


•9


Georgia,


3


New- York,


66


Ohio,


11


New- Jersey,


16


Kentucky,


3


Pennsylvania,


12


Tennessee,


2


Delaware,


2


Lounaua,


1/


Maryland,


o


Michigan,


1


District of Columbia,


1


Missouii,


1


Total number, 168. The number of these auxiliary societies are rapidly increasing throughout the world, and their good effects may easily be anticipated. These, and the establish- ment of Sunday Schools in different parts of the Uni- ted States, has had the most salutary effects, and eve- ry good man will no doubt give encouragement to that rich source, which opens a ii eld to virtue, and plants .the ever living seeds of a glorious immortality.

Where wisdom dwells, there virtue reigns.


DANIEL, D. SMITH, BOOKSELLER $ STATIONER,

NO. 190, GREENWICH-STREET,

lleUJsjjfqrjr,

Has constantly for sale Who'esalc fy Retail on the

most reasonable terms a general asssortraent of !?6oks and Stationary (particularly School Books) air.ong which are the following,) viz :


Bibles & Testaments Spelling books, all kinds Psalms & Hymns Hartford Selection of

Hymns Methodist Hymn books Bap list do Common Prayer books Walkers Dictionary Johnsons do &c. Aiosworths Latin & Eng. "•■ ugents Fr.& Eng. do Dufiefs do do Bayers do do Dufiefs Nature Displayed pWrins Fr. & En. grammar Perrins Exercises Elements of conver-


Greek Grammar

Latin do

Clarks Introduction

Mairs do

Huddimaq's Rudiments

JEutropie

Jacksons book keeping

and others Ink Powder black & red


Guthries Universal Ge^g. Cummings do & Atlas Goldsmith's do & do

— History of

Rome Greece & Eng. Weems Washington Am. Orators & Precep; Columbian Orators Dialogues for Schools Monitors, CliilJs lustruc. Juvenile Expositors Murray s English Reader Grammar & Introduction Murrays Key Exercises

Sequel

Expositors and Preceptors Dil worths Assistant

Gibbons do

Key to do

Dabojls Arithmetic

Federal Calculator

American Selections

Art of Reading

Childress books

Primers

Blank books of all kinds

Paper of all kinds

Sand boxes &c. &c. &c.