The passing of Korea

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The passing of Korea  (1906)  by Homer Bezalee Hulbert
Cover and Dedication

THE

PASSING OF KOREA

BY

HOMER B. HULBERT

A.M., F.R.G.S.

Author of "The History of Korea," "Comparative Grammar of Korea and Dravidian," "A Search for the Siberian Klondike," etc.

Illustrated from Photographs

NEW YORK

Doubleday, Page & Company

1906

Copyright, 1906, by

Doubleday, Page & Company

Published, September, 1906


All rights reserved,
including that of translation into foreign languages,
including the Scandinavian

Dedicated

TO HIS MAJESTY

THE EMPEROR OF KOREA

AS A TOKEN OF HIGH ESTEEM AND A PLEDGE OF
UNWAVERING ALLEGIANCE, AT A TIME WHEN
CALUMNY HAS DONE ITS WORST AND
JUSTICE HAS SUFFERED AN ECLIPSE

AND

TO THE KOREAN PEOPLE

WHO ARE NOW WITNESSING THE PASSING OF OLD KOREA
TO GIVE PLACE TO A NEW, WHEN THE SPIRIT OF THE
NATION, QUICKENED BY THE TOUCH OF FIRE,
SHALL HAVE PROVED THAT THOUGH
"SLEEP IS THE IMAGE OF DEATH"
IT IS NOT DEATH ITSELF

PREFACE

MANY excellent books have been written about Korea, each of them approaching the subject from a slightly different angle. In the present volume I have attempted to handle the theme from a more intimate standpoint than that of the casual tourist.

Much that is contained in this present volume is matter that has come under the writer's personal observation or has been derived directly from Koreans or from Korean works. Some of this matter has already appeared in The Korea Review and elsewhere. The historical survey is a condensation from the writer's "History of Korea."

This book is a labour of love, undertaken in the days of Korea's distress, with the purpose of interesting the reading public in a country and a people that have been frequently maligned and seldom appreciated. They are overshadowed by China on the one hand in respect of numbers, and by Japan on the other in respect of wit. They are neither good merchants like the one nor good fighters like the other, and yet they are far more like Anglo-Saxons in temperament than either, and they are by far the pleasantest people in the Far East to live amongst. Their failings are such as follow in the wake of ignorance everywhere, and the bettering of their opportunities will bring swift betterment to their condition.

For aid in the compilation of this book my thanks are mainly due to a host of kindly Koreans from every class in society, from the silk-clad yangban to the fettered criminal in prison, from the men who go up the mountains to monasteries to those who go down to the sea in ships.

H. B. H.

NEW YORK, 1906.

CONTENTS
Introductory. The Problem Page
3
Chapter
I. Where and what Korea is above and below ground 10
II. The People 27
III. Government 45
IV. Legendary and Ancient History 69
V. Medieval History 78
VI. The Golden Age of Korea and the Japanese Invasion 90
VII. The Manchu Invasion and Early Christianity 103
VIII. The Opening of Korea 114
IX. The Assassination of the Queen 129
X. The Independence Club 148
XI. Russian Intrigue 169
XII. The Japan-Russia War 185
XIII. The Battle of Chemulpo 199
XIV. The Japanese in Korea 208
XV. Revenue 225
XVI. The Currency 234
XVII. Architecture and Building 241
XVIII. Transportation 252
XIX. Korean Industries 269
XX. Domestic and Foreign Trade 281
XXI. Monuments and Relics 288
XXII. Language 300
XXIII. Literature 306
XXIV. Music and Poetry 314
XXV. Art 330
XXVI. Education 335
XXVII. The Emperor of Korea 343
XXVIII. Woman's Position 349
XXIX. Folk-lore 372
XXX. Religion and Superstition 403
XXXI. Slavery 432
XXXII. Funeral procession—Geomancy 437
XXXIII. Burial Customs 445
XXXIV. Modern Improvements 456
XXXV. The Future of Korea 461
 
INDEX 467
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
 
The Emperor of Korea Frontispiece
FACING PAGE
The faithful Fuel-Carriers of Korea 18
Shoeing a Bull 20
American Bridge across the Han 28
A dancing-girl Posturing 40
Otium sine Dignitate 62
Relics of Ancient Korea 72
Three Bridges of Korea 74
Ruins of "Golden Pagoda," Ancient Silla 82
Bas-Relief on Door of Ancient Silla Pagoda 82
Astronomical Observatory of Ancient Silla 82
The Marble Pagoda in Seoul 86
A Buddhist Relic in the South 86
The Late Regent, Prince Tai-Wun 116
Buddhist Abbot 130
A Picturesque Nook in the Old Palace 132
A Palace-Woman in Full Regalia 138
Two of the Foreign Legations in Korea 150
The Japanese Legation 190
The French Legation Building 204
Martial Law 210
Views of Picturesque Korea 216
Min Yong Whan, Prince and General 222
The Korean Farmer 226
A Corner Grocery 244
How they Shovel Dirt 246
Building a Dirt Wall 248
Art and Religion 250
Water-Carriers at a Neighbourhood Well 258
The Shipyard 260
Two Industries of Korea 264
Automatic Water-Mill 266
Hulling Rice 270
Poultry Peddler 270
Boys who Gather Grass for Fuel 272
Dead Child Tied to Tree 272
Placer Gold-Mining 274
An Archery Tournament 278
An Interesting Chess Problem 282
Swinging 286
Stone Dog, Guardian of Palace against Fire 290
A Boundary Stone 294
Symbols of Korea's Religion 296
A Member of the Body-Guard of the God of War 302
Village Devil-Posts 302
Mural Decorations in Old Palace 332
Woman's Correct Street Costume 354
The Laundry 356
Imperial "funeral Baked Meats" 440
A Prince's Tomb 448
The South Gate, Seoul 450
Stone Image near Tomb 452
The American Methodist Church, Seoul 454
Residence of the American Consul-General 458
The Emperor of Korea.jpg

THE EMPEROR OF KOREA

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1949, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 60 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.