The year's at the spring/Yeats, W. B

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The year's at the spring
Yeats, W. B.: Cradle-Song

The Fiddler of Dooney

WHEN I play on my fiddle in Dooney, 
 Folk dance like a wave of the sea;
My cousin is priest in Kilvarnet,
 My brother in Moharabuiee.


I passed my brother and cousin:
 They read in their books of prayer;
I read in my book of songs
 I bought at the Sligo fair.


When we come at the end of time,
 To Peter sitting in state,
He will smile on the three old spirits,
 But call me first through the gate;


For the good are always the merry,
 Save by an evil chance,
And the merry love the fiddle,
 And the merry love to dance:

"WHEN WE COME AT THE END OF TIME, TO PETER SITTING IN STATE" 
 

And when the folk there spy me,
 They will all come up to me,
With "Here is the fiddler of Dooney!"
 And dance like a wave of the sea.


The Lake Isle of Innisfree

I WILL arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made;
Nine bean rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee,
 And live alone in the bee-loud glade.


And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,
Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;
There midnight's all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,
 And evening full of the linnet's wings.


I will arise and go now, for always, night and day,
I hear lake-water lapping with low sounds by the shore;
While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey,
 I hear it in the deep heart's core.