Three Books of Occult Philosophy/Book 1/Chapter 46

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Three Books of Occult Philosophy by Henry Cornelius Agrippa, translated by John French
Book 1, Chapter 46

the vertue of the male. In like manner we see, that the crampfish being touched afar off with a long pole, doth presently stupify the hand of him that toucheth it. And if any shall touch the sea Hare with his hand or stick, doth presently run out of his wits. Also if the fish called Stella, as they say, being fastned with the blood of a Fox and a brass nail to a gate, evill medicines can do no hurt. Also it is said, that if a woman take a needle, and beray it with dung, and then wrap it up in earth, in which the carkass of a man was buryed, and shall carry it about her in a cloth which was used at the funerall, that no man shall be able to ly with her as long as she hath it about her. Now by these examples we see, how by certain alligations of certain things, as also suspensions, or by a simple contact, or the continuation of any thread, we may be able to receive some vertues thereby. It is necessary that we know the certain rule of alligation, and suspension, and the manner which the Art requires, viz. that they be done under a certain, and sutable constellation, and that they be done with wyer, or silken threads, with hair, or sinews of certain animals. And things that are to be wrapped up must be done in the leaves of hearbs, or the skins of animals, or fine cloths, and the like, according to the sutableness of things: as if you would procure the solary vertue of any thing, this being wrapped up in bay leaves, or the skin of a Lion, hang it about thy neck with a golden thread, or a silken thread of a yallow colour, whilest the Sun rules in the heaven: so thou shalt be endued with the Solary vertue of that thing. But if thou dost desire the vertue of any Saturnine thing, thou shalt in like maner take that thing whilest Saturn raignes, and wrap it up in the skin of an Ass, or in a cloth used at a funerall, especially if thou desirest it for sadness, and with a black thread hang it about thy neck. In like manner we must conceive of the rest.