To Alaska for Gold

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To Alaska for Gold  (1899) 
by Edward Stratemeyer
Third volume in the Bound to Succeed series
To Alaska for Gold.djvu

TO ALASKA FOR GOLD


OR


The Fortune Hunters of the Yukon


BY

EDWARD STRATEMEYER

AUTHOR OF "UNDER DEWEY AT MANILA," "A YOUNG VOLUNTEER IN CUBA"
"FIGHTING IN CUBAN WATERS," "RICHARD DARE'S VENTURE"
"OLIVER BRIGHT'S SEARCH," ETC., ETC.


ILLUSTRATED BY A. B. SHUTE


BOSTON
LEE AND SHEPARD PUBLISHERS
1899

Copyright, 1899, by Lee and Shepard,


All Rights Reserved.


To Alaska for Gold.



Norwood Press
J. S. Cushing & Co.—Berwick & Smith
Norwood Mass. U.S.A.

To Alaska for Gold p008.jpg

"Uncle Foster! Earl! Look at This!"—Page 170.

PREFACE.


"To Alaska for Gold" forms the third volume of the "Bound to Succeed" Series. Like the preceding tales, this story is complete in itself.

The rush to the far-away territory of Alaska, when gold in large quantities was discovered upon Klondike Creek, was somewhat similar to the rush to California in years gone by. The gold fever spread to even the remotest of our hamlets, and men, young and old, poured forth, ready to endure every hardship if only the much-coveted prize might be secured. That many succeeded and that many more failed is now a matter of history, although of recent date.

In this story are related the adventures of two Maine boys who leave their home among the lumbermen, travel to California, there to join their uncle, an experienced miner, and several other men, and start on the long trip to the Klondike by way of Dyea, Chilkoot Pass, and the lakes and streams forming the headwaters of the mighty Yukon River. After many perils the gold district is reached, and here a summer and winter are passed, the former in hunting for the precious metal and the latter in a never ending struggle to sustain life until the advent of spring.

In writing the description of this new El Dorado the author has endeavored to be as accurate as possible, and has consulted, for this purpose, the leading authorities on Alaska and its resources, as well as digested the sometimes tedious, but, nevertheless, always interesting, government reports covering this subject. Regarding the personal experiences of his heroes he would add that nearly every incident cited has been taken from life, as narrated by those who joined in the frenzied rush to the new gold fields.


EDWARD STRATEMEYER.

Newark, N.J.,
April 1, 1899.

CONTENTS.


CHAPTER PAGE
I. A Letter from the West 1
II. The Boys reach a Decision 9
III. A False Identification 18
IV. A Serious Set-back 27
V. A Night in New York 36
VI. Preparations for Departure 44
VII. Buying the Outfits 52
VIII. On the Way to Juneau 61
IX. The Fate of a Stowaway 69
X. Up the Lynn Canal 77
XI. The Start from Dyea 85
XII. Earl has an Adventure 93
XIII. At the Summit of Chilkoot Pass 101
XIV. Boat-building at Lake Linderman 109
XV. On to Lake Bennett 118
XVI. An Exciting Night in Camp 127
XVII. A Hunt for Food 134
XVIII. On to the White Horse Rapids 141
XIX. Nearing the End of a Long Journey 149
XX. The Gold Fields at Last 157
XXI. A Day in Dawson City 164
XXII. Digging for Gold 172
XXIII. Good Luck and Bad 180
XXIV. An Unlooked-for Arrival 187
XXV. More Work in the Gulches 195
XXVI. Sluice Boxes and Preparations for Winter 203
XXVII. The End of the Summer Season 211
XXVIII. Snowed in 219
XXIX. Waiting and Watching for Spring 227
XXX. Last Washings for Gold 235
XXXI. Down the Yukon and Home 243

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS


"'Uncle Foster! Earl! look at this'" Frontispiece
PAGE
"With a final kick the stowaway was run off the gang-plank" 72
"The water was boiling on every side" 125
"'I would like to see the prisoner, please'" 196


This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1923.

The author died in 1930, so this work is also in the public domain in countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 80 years or less. This work may also be in the public domain in countries and areas with longer native copyright terms that apply the rule of the shorter term to foreign works.